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TheBlackProject

Silk Road, online black market for drugs, shut down by FBI with founde

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arsenal_fan

 

How do you know? What about the fact the site was involved in criminal conspiracies like framing an investigative reporter for heroin dealing, two attempted murders and likely by proxy the funding of violent organised crime?

 

The site wasn't responsible, a site can't go out and call hits on folks. Its management on the other hand can, it was the owner that allegedly went of the deep-end. If the site was run properly we wouldn't be reading this story.

 

 

You use to be able to order hitmen on that site until late last year, same with child pornography.

 

 

Anyway, there are two other simlar websites like this out so all the Silk Road users will just go there.

Edited by arsenal_fan

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sivispacem

I'm not so sure about people transitioning to other, similar sites accessible via Tor. This plus the compromising of the Tor implementation a few months ago to corner a guy responsible for running child porn servers goes to show that the system is fundamentally imperfect, and that therefore it provides neither complete anonymity nor complete privacy. Take the example of Bitcoin- if Bitcoin were to collapse, I doubt it would be replaced with other cryprocurrency.

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arsenal_fan

I'm only going by from what I've read on their forums and some of my friends Sivis, a lot of the sellers are moving onto the other websites and so are the buyers. According to this article anyway, Ulbricht was caught because of his early mistakes using the normal web and not because the FBI cracked the deep web.

 

"Indeed, according to its complaint, the FBI eventually found Ulbricht by scouring the “surface web” for hints of Ulbricht’s identity—as opposed to the deep web, which is not indexed by search engines. Ulbricht slipped up early in the process when he first began to promote Silk Road on a surface-web site forum dedicated to illegal drugs using the handle “Altoid.” Months later, according to the complaint, Ulbricht appeared on another forum under the same handle asking for information about Bitcoin and asking other readers to email him. He then listed his personal email address. These slip ups, among others, eventually allowed the FBI to close in on Ulbricht identity and the location of Silk Road’s servers."

Anyway, regarding bitcoins, I'm sure people won't put it in their drug account on the website from now on as I've hear people lost money and now they can't access the website, they can't get it back. So I can see dealers and buyers just transfering it from their account to another to stop that risk from happening again.
Edited by arsenal_fan

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sivispacem

Oh, I'm aware of how he was caught, but the fact he apparently had dealings with several undercover police officers and federal agents in his time running the Silk Road demonstrates that these organisations are relatively easy for law enforcement to penetrate. The same has been true of various freelancers and security experts with connections to law enforcement, like the aforementioned Brian Krebs. He and other security researchers have had an active presence inside numerous criminal forums- in fact, in his blog he frequently reveals the findings of his interaction with DDoSers, carders, people involved in the Silk Road, botnets, financial fraud, identity theft, phishing and all sorts of other criminal pastimes. Some of these communities are much harder to infiltrate than the sites accessible by Tor, solely based on the fact they're invitation-only.

 

I've got every confidence that large numbers of small-time sellers are going to be moving on to other sites, as will buyers, but this fundamentally demonstrates the near-impossibility of separating virtual from real if you're going to do something that involves a physical medium. No matter how competent the big-time sellers are in regard to their security, there are still going to be weak points, and if these were enough to catch out the ringleader of probably the largest illicit goods marketplace in the US, then I think it's reasonable to assume that many people are going to start questioning just how secure operating in a sphere which is coming under more and more scrutiny from law enforcement actually is. The Tor implementation has been compromised once already, effectively causing users to be identifiable. The same will happen again sooner or later, and in fact probably already has- we just don't know about it yet.

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Mr.Mister

Another victim to the game it seems.

 

I have bought weed and shrooms several times online, quick and discreet service. I am surprised about the murder allegations, if I was the Silk Road head honcho I would be pretty paranoid about dabbling into other areas of illegal business. As we all know, nothing will change, another guy will run a similar business, get caught, police get paid. The cycle of life.

 

America is really ramping up on cyber security, should be interesting to see what the future of the Internet will be like.

Edited by Mr.Mister

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Captain VXR

I know one guy that used to buy Afghan hash on silk road. Never done so myself, Still, there's a sunken city on the deep web to buy drugs from.

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King Kapone

This guy sounds freaking fascinating. Man operates internet drug ring, hires assassins, and calls himself Dread Pirate Roberts. His story needs to become a book, now.

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MindCorrupt

No one is claiming he's guilty of murder. He's been indicted for soliciting and paying for an assassination from and undercover agent which is about as damning an indictment I can think of. There's nothing to contradict what's being said by the police, federal agencies, external observers in the know ect ect so I really don't think it's reasonable to allege a character assassination without some evidence to support that allegation. I mean if you want to present an argument about how all the charges are bogus and the indictment bunk then be my guest..

Sorry, I was under the impression that the charge was the same as murder even if you paid someone else to do it (is it not?) and from the information I had read was a apparent quote from a message from DPR complaining about the price of the contract, saying he had paid half as much last time for a "clean hit". I must have been behind on my reading or misread as the info I was going on was the incident between DPR and FriendlyChemist where he allegedly referred to an earlier hit (which I now know to be a sting)

 

I just find it all a bit strange, he's obviously an intelligent man and going from running the website from the shadows to allegedly being the middle man for cocaine deals and eventually going as at as attempting to have someone murdered just seem like massive leaps. For someone who seemed so paranoid about security he seemed to have taken the bait from the undercover agents pretty easily without any red flags going up.

 

Anyways, I'll hold my judgement until it all comes out in court. No doubt there will be a media circus around this one.

 

Hope this post makes some kind of sense, should stop browsing the net so late at night.

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sivispacem

Intelligence has little to do with it. He did some really, really stupid things that linked his online identity to his offline one. Like ordering fake IDs from his own website using his own driving license picture and having them delivered to his home address. And making server-side changes on the bulletproof hosting site that ran the Silk Road from an unsecured internet cafe over the road from the hotel he was staying at.

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Finn 7 five 11

Intelligence has little to do with it. He did some really, really stupid things that linked his online identity to his offline one. Like ordering fake IDs from his own website using his own driving license picture and having them delivered to his home address. And making server-side changes on the bulletproof hosting site that ran the Silk Road from an unsecured internet cafe over the road from the hotel he was staying at.

If anything he got complacent and felt untouchable. That's what seems to people in power.

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sivispacem

 

Intelligence has little to do with it. He did some really, really stupid things that linked his online identity to his offline one. Like ordering fake IDs from his own website using his own driving license picture and having them delivered to his home address. And making server-side changes on the bulletproof hosting site that ran the Silk Road from an unsecured internet cafe over the road from the hotel he was staying at.

If anything he got complacent and felt untouchable. That's what seems to people in power.

 

 

It'll be interesting to see in the process of the case exactly how long he was directly interacting with federal and local law enforcement agent for.

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lucid121

Tor is no longer a safe place. Time to move to I2p.

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sivispacem

I2P is only as safe as the peered connection you make. Nothing to stop people spoofing identities

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K^2

I2P is only as safe as the peered connection you make. Nothing to stop people spoofing identities

The network is statistically safe at the moment. Naturally, if you are under suspicion and ISP cooperates, anyone can create a swarm of peers to infiltrate your connection. But otherwise, it's a large enough network with enough traffic on it to be relatively secure. Partly because nobody payed much attention to it until recently. Hopefully, it stays this way. If I2P goes down, we are going to be completely without a reliable anon network, and I consider such a network to be critical in ability of population to keep government in check. Yeah, there's a lot of morally questionable stuff going on there, but it's also being used to bypass gov't censorship in places like China. And even in US having a back channel can only be a good thing.

 

Anyways, if I2P goes down, we'll have to switch to some really paranoid methods. Distributed encrypted traffic, encrypted virtual machines, maybe steganography on legit traffic instead of plain obfuscation.

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