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i7 2600 Or 2600K


Kanja

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I'm Confused I Wanna Buy i7 But I'm bit confused what i should buy. Core i7 2600 is Cheaper than 2600k And i can easily afford. But is there any Performance issue between these 2? Please help me in decision. I'm Confused.

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Same performance between those two. Only thing is overclocking, if you want to overclock then you should get the K version. If no then the 2600 version. Altough, if you want to save money then buy a i5 2500 or 2500K cause thats pretty much all you need. Ofc when you do need all the hyperthreading stufff i7 offers then go ahead.

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I Actually want to play heavy games on it. Do you think i5 2500k/2500 can handle games like Bf3 Easily? Difference Is between i5 and i7 (2MB Cache, Hyper threading) Does these really matter on games?

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Not really, the difference between performance of those two is really zilch.

As Bruce said, if you want to overclock get one of the K versions.

 

The only thing that the 2600(k) is better at, is that it has multi-threading.

But, there are few programs that use more than 4 cores, so the 2500(k) is just as fast, and quite a bit cheaper wink.gif

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If you can afford the 2600K, go for it, since it will be more future proof than a 2500K. Additionally, in case you're not aware, you're going to need to buy a new motherboard, RAM, and GPU if you upgrade.

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If you can afford the 2600K, go for it, since it will be more future proof than a 2500K. Additionally, in case you're not aware, you're going to need to buy a new motherboard, RAM, and GPU if you upgrade.

lol yes ofc i know that. I'm Getting 550 watts PSU, 4GB DDr3 Ram and A Motherboard that can handle Core i7

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Not really, the difference between performance of those two is really zilch.

As Bruce said, if you want to overclock get one of the K versions.

 

The only thing that the 2600(k) is better at, is that it has multi-threading.

But, there are few programs that use more than 4 cores, so the 2500(k) is just as fast, and quite a bit cheaper wink.gif

Actually they both have multi-threading.

The actual difference is the overclocking capabilities.

The K can overclock a lot and easily.

The non-K can overclock but only a very little bit.

You could get the K version to 5GHz for example, but you might only be able to get the non-K to say 4Hgz if you're lucky.

Other than the OCing, they are both the exact same CPU in every way.

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I doubt there are plentiful programs using 4 cores or more, That's been contradicted in a reputable press article

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2600K all the way. My 2600K @ 4.3 runs everything I throw at it smooth as butter along with my 560 Ti SLi. Having 12GB of 1600MHz RAM helps as well. Unless you don't plan on overclocking then go 2600K. Overclocking a plain 2600 is just asking for trouble as raising the BCLK on Sandy Bridge results in "overclocking" your PCIe lanes which is not only pointless but can potentially cause major instability. Then there's also the fact it will be overclocking the RAM as well. Much easier to just get the K version and bump up the CPU multi. The days of raising FSB/BCLK are over. Sandy Bridge-E has introduced a Reference Clock Ratio (RCR) multiplier as an alternative to raising the BCLK, which does not affect PCIe/SATA/etc. frequencies, however still affects RAM frequencies, so you must watch your RAM multiplier.

 

tl;dr: Overclocking? 2600K. Not overclocking? 2600.

Edited by SyphonPayne
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Exkabewbikadid

I Have a [email protected] cooled with a cheap, but effective Cooler Master Hyper 212. Temps under full load only reach ~60°C. Point being is that if you want to overclock and get a good bit of extra performance out of the cpu, then the unlocked K chips are worth the extra cost.

 

Alternatively as already mentioned, you could go with the 2500K. It won't lag behind a 2600K in games (most games are highly dependent on the gpu and not very cpu intensive anyhow), but when it comes to video encoding and other stuff the 2600K will be faster.

oQywcQM.jpg

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Memory controller is in the CPU die with the new gen chips

http://www.bit-tech.net/hardware/cpus/2011...idge-e-review/1

 

As old timers know, the North Bridge and South Bridge are used on both Intel and AMD boards past, and other chipsets like VIA and SiS

 

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Northbridge_(computing)

 

Edited by Slamman
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Guys I Have another option which seems very useful to me.

 

as Xcommunicated said. I Should go for i5 2500k if i want to play games. If i do this then i save almost $100 and these can be spent on Gpu, as i have the most sh*tty GPu 9500gt. lolz. Is there any problems if i do this? I Mean any kind of difficulties In playing games Or Other stuff.

 

also can some one please explain what's hyper threading? Cos every one is saying Core i7 2600k has 2mb Cache with Hyper threading. Does hyper threading Effects gameplay?

 

Thanks

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Actually they both have multi-threading.

They do?

On the Intel.com site I read that the i7 has Hyperthreading and the i5 didn't, or did I read wrong?

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friendly luggage

It's all about balancing your build. You don't want to spend just £100 on an i3 and then spend £600 on a GTX 590. In games the difference between an second gen i5 and i7 at the moment is questionable. While playing GTA IV with iCEnhancer and settings on high (sliders at 40) my CPU usage is only around 40%. The only thing whats restricting my FPS is my graphics card (GTX 560 Ti). What ever you choose just make sure you have a decent PSU so in the future when you upgrade your GPU you'll have more room to choose wink.gif

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I thought to link this as well, before I lose the web page, hopefully enlightening

 

http://www.overclockers.com/intel-i7-2600k...y-bridge-review

 

Kanja, read all my prior replies, I always mentioned HTT, which is Hyper Threading Technology. It's Intel's dual thread support in each core since the mid 2000s. Introduced for Pentium 4, it allows those writing applications to use multi-threads within a single core. The effect is akin to dual core from a single core, but it's not the same as having actual DUAL CORES in your CPU. It can allow a game like GTA IV to run on a single core however! haha

 

The other comment is about your 9500GT nVidia, I probably got the same card, as I hadn't familiarized myself with it's gaming prowess, and I kept going for what I thought were good mid-line budget cards. Prior to that I bought the 9250 ATI I believe, anyway, that card was certainly geared for non-gaming as well.

Edited by Slamman
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Actually they both have multi-threading.

They do?

On the Intel.com site I read that the i7 has Hyperthreading and the i5 didn't, or did I read wrong?

I thought you were saying the i7-2600 didn't have multi-threading and that only the K-version did.

One of us got confused some where. My bad if it was me

 

 

@Kanja

Hyper/multi-threading is just a way of saying the CPU acts like it has 1 more core than it really does. So the older single core CPUs that had this feature would act like a dual-core in a way.

As for the i5-2500 vs i7-2600. Yes you can get more or less the same gaming performance from the 2500 as the 2600, depends on the game. If you look at the benchmarks there difference is minimal in the grand scheme of things. My suggestion; if you're primary use for the system is gaming and hardly anything else, then save some money and get the i5. If you don't plan to overclock then get the non-K version, which will also save you a bit more money.

If you plan to do things like gaming but also video editing, 3D model working, photo editing, transcoding files, things like that that will really chew on the CPU then get the i7.

Edited by Wolf68k
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HTT did precede Pentium -D and Core Duo, which I pointed out, allowing even Office apps to run multi-tasks more efficiently

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HTT did precede Pentium -D and Core Duo, which I pointed out, allowing even Office apps to run multi-tasks more efficiently

What purpose does this serve to contribute to the topic? Wolf's aside was just that, an aside. If you don't have anything intelligent, sensible or on-topic to contribute to the thread, please just leave before one of the staff bans you.

Edited by sivispacem

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FYIs are helpful, since he's saying what I'm saying, but without the "part about the"....

You peeps need to get a hold of yourselves. All information relating to the CPU that is an attribute is helpful, And getting to know more about what it is. HTT is HyperThread Technology Intel pioneered. Not to be confused with Hyper Transport in the AMD series CPUs, which does strive for the same result. I'm passing along what I've read, I find it informative and that's why it's presented. You don't need to know how an engine works to drive your car, but some people might like to know just the same.

 

A link in that regard;

 

https://kb.wisc.edu/showroom/page.php?id=4927

 

 

User warned for off topic posts.

Edited by Xcommunicated
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AMD's Hyper Transport is not a similar feature to Intel's Hyper Thread.

@OP

Core i7 2600K if you can afford it.

Core i7 2600 for encoding, and other apps that are multithread

Core i5 2500K for games

All other Sandy Bridge down to Core i3 if you are on a tight budget.

Core i3 are faster than certain AMD quads in terms of gaming.

Edited by Stinky12
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You peeps need to get a hold of yourselves. All information relating to the CPU that is an attribute is helpful

No it's not. In what way is spouting some facts related to early Pentium D and Core Duo processors helpful in assisting someone to choose between a i7 2600 and a 2600K?

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It's a basis of understanding the tech, Here's AMD's site for Hyper Transport, if you think about it, also HTT, but Intel is the one that is true in my example, it came out in the mid 2000s and offered the first semi-Dual core CPU solution for home computing, then came Pentium D and Centrino Duo, Dual Core, first generation processors

 

http://www.amd.com/us/products/technologie...technology.aspx

 

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Exkabewbikadid

 

It's a basis of understanding the tech, Here's AMD's site for Hyper Transport, if you think about it, also HTT, but Intel is the one that is true in my example, it came out in the mid 2000s and offered the first semi-Dual core CPU solution for home computing, then came Pentium D and Centrino Duo, Dual Core, first generation processors

 

http://www.amd.com/us/products/technologie...technology.aspx

Again, HyperTransport is not synonymous with Hyper Threading. AMD doesn't have an equivalent to Intel's HTT i.e. AMD processors only have single-threaded cores. AMD used HyperTransport as a replacement for the Front Side Bus. And none of this has anything to do with the topic at hand.

 

All that needs to be said and has already been said is that Hyper Threading is only useful provided you are using applications that are heavily multi-threaded e.g. 8+ threads and can take advantage of two threads per core. So

 

i5 2500/K - 4 cores and 4 threads

i7 2600/K - 4 cores and 8 threads

 

oQywcQM.jpg

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The point is the end result is much the same, I read the information I relate, in other words, I'm inclined to believe press based on competent magazines that deal with computers day in and day out as part of their job and career, I'd mentioned NOT TO BE CONFUSED WITH in that they are using the same abbreviations, but clearly AMD and Intel don't even share the same sockets anymore, they are however, both CPUs entrusted with the same function in a computer.

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OkThanks For clearing my mind about Ht. I'm going with this.

 

intel Core i7 2600 (As i'm not Overclock freak, Limited Budget) sad.gif

4GB (2X2GB) DDR3 Ram

And This Motherboard http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx...l%20motherboard

I Have 350 Watta PSU(Can it handle i7 2600 with 9500gt) otherwise I'm going to get 550 watts

and Getting all These in $450

 

 

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The graphics card is pretty much the same as mine, My two best PSUs are under 500 watts, but under 400 is on the weak side for modern setups. One thing however, the shrink in core sizes allows better energy efficiency, so that should mean you don't have a power-hungry beast, in theory

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Just exactly how much can you spend? Is $450 your budget?

What parts do you need?

CPU, motherboard, anything else?

 

With a budget like that, you will have to opt for AMD

 

AMD Phenom II X4 960T Zosma 3.0GHz $109.99

http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx...N82E16819103995

ASUS M5A97 AM3+ AMD 970 SATA 6Gb/s USB 3.0 $94.99

http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx...N82E16813131767

HIS H679F1GD Radeon HD 6790 1GB $129.99

http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx...N82E16814161377

CORSAIR Builder Series CX600 V2 $69.99

http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx...N82E16817139028

All this comes out to a subtotal of $404.96

 

According to your sig, you have already have DDR3 ram so you can use that or get faster ones.

 

optional:

G.SKILL Ripjaws X Series 8GB (2 x 4GB) 240-Pin DDR3 SDRAM DDR3 1600 $29.99

http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx...N82E16820231428

subtotal $434.95

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However, you can tell from his avatar, he's a fan of the Core2 series Intels! haha As you can tell from my signature, I'm more inclined to Intel myself, but have more then one AMD system, I have three rather good ones, Athlon 64 and older vintage, not the newest Phenoms, but I wouldn't be totally adverse to them, most people are a bit clock speed, power hungry and feel confident in Intel's new CPUs and progress. When I mentioned the 2011 socket and SB-Es before, it was based on an article charting where Intel could go with unlocking 8 cores of the Sandy Bridge in the next year and a half, it's an investment that might be too soon to make at present.

 

I've got an nForce4 where I used ATI graphics, you have a nice dual PCIe on that board, which is where I plan to upgrade on my own systems, get a SLi or Crossfire platform, since my 8600 is SLi compatible, would you run a nVidia SLI on your AMD board without issue?

Edited by Slamman
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