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Law Enforcement Against Prohibition


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Sure, I know this belongs in the existing D&D topic or OFS thread, but I thought maybe this is a bit different, and maybe needs it's own discussion. The reason I think that is because those threads are generally for people who are already involved in smoking marijuana, and this post isn't really about that.

 

You don't have to be a marijuana smoker to know that the war on drugs in the US is causing more innocent deaths than preventing anyone from doing drugs. Not to mention the amount of wasted tax dollars. More and more 'regular', socially upstanding people are calling for the end of the prohibition, and an end to the war on drugs.

 

I saw this bumper sticker yesterday.

Law Enforcement Against Prohibition

 

On June 23, 2011 the “Ending Federal Prohibition of Marijuana Act of 2011″ was introduced in Congress. If passed, this bill would remove marijuana from federal scheduling and enable states to pass their own laws, regulations and taxes regarding marijuana.Please write to your representatives now and urge them to support this historic legislation!

 

 

 

 

 

I hovered over 'post new topic' for a bit on this one moto_whistle.gif

 

 

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Moonshield

This is great news, and with strict regulation, a great way to stimulate our economy. If this passes, it'll be no doubt that California would be one of the first to enact their own legalization bill.

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It's weird because I've always felt that Canada was trying to model our judicial system after that of the United States, especially when it came to mandatory (minimum) sentencing guidelines. One of the things that really stuck out was that our current government has introduced legislation (which will pass since it's a majority government) that would stipulate possession of very little marijuana (I forget the exact quantity) would require a two-year sentence (whether it is two-years-less-a-day or two-years-and-a-day would mean the difference between a provincial jail and a federal penitentiary) automatically. Our prisons are already overcrowded and there are better people to be in jail/prison instead of someone who decided to toke up. Keep the rapists and murderers in prison; the pot smokers aren't really harming anyone.

 

I guess my point of us modeling after the United States is that I read recently that California is thinking of releasing inmates who were convicted of minor drug offenses because of severe overcrowding in the state's correctional facilities, so it seems like you guys are starting to ease up a bit, whereas we've decided to take an unnecessary hardline approach.

 

Then again, the government's justification for all this is there's a rise in unreported crimes. Go figure.

 

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Not too involved in American politics, but this seems to me like one of those populist/sensationalist things brought up before an election to create a buzz around a candidate. Could win some of the independents, I guess.

 

EDIT: spelling etc




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I hear ya Icarus.

 

A lot of cities and municipalities have decriminalized marijuana here recently, using the jail crowding and cost of prosecution as the reason. It just happened here in Philadelphia within the past year or two. Now in this city if you are caught with under 30grams it is just a summary offense. You pay a fine and nothing goes on your record.

 

I think it is the structure of our government here that makes it wacky. It is so granular, yet still somewhat micromanaged. I work in the government on the 3rd level down and get to see some of the weirdness firsthand.

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This is good news, for one reason that I always think of aswell. Like when I pick up from my dealer I always end up thinking afterwards and once when I was high, that there are all these American soldiers, British soldiers, Mexican Drug gangs killing each other and innocent people getting caught up in the cross firings and I'm here buying marijuana fueling their pockets and the Grey economy with some of those things I mentioned above orbiting that 1/8 of marijuana.

 

If these laws are ever passed, this would mean a great deal.

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Is there any place I can find the actual wording to this bill?

I want to read it.

 

So a straight up answer to what I think. I believe we should legalize cannabis, in all it's forms.

I also believe we need to use a decriminalization stance similar to Portugal. Portugal decriminalized the use of ALL drugs, guess what things have gotten BETTER.

 

If you need me to, I can provide sources, or just go look yourself.

 

I also want to say many teens say it is easier to buy cannabis than beer.

 

So just remember that, regulation equals less student use.

Edited by Xboxless

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gtafreakgamer

 

Is there any place I can find the actual wording to this bill?

I want to read it.

 

So a straight up answer to what I think. I believe we should legalize cannabis, in all it's forms.

I also believe we need to use a decriminalization stance similar to Portugal. Portugal decriminalized the use of ALL drugs, guess what things have gotten BETTER.

 

If you need me to, I can provide sources, or just go look yourself.

 

I also want to say many teens say it is easier to buy cannabis than beer.

 

So just remember that, regulation equals less student use.

Here is the link to the bill.

 

It was introduced by Rep. Barney Frank (D), Rep. Ron Paul ® and a few others. Thats interesting because Ron Paul is currently running for president. If this bill goes nowhere then hopefully he can be elected president and do something about it in office. There have been far too many innocent people die in the name of the War on Drugs.

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Finn 7 five 11

I think if its legalized in the U.S.A it won't be long before Australia follows.

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A great step forward socially and possibly economically.

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gtafreakgamer

I think economically it could be really good. It would end the black market for marijuana and also allow for new companies to sell it. These companies could open up new jobs which would be great. That said though, I support legalization not to tax it or to help out the economy but to legalize freedom. People should be able to choose what to put into their own bodies so this would be a big step towards that.

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If it becomes legalized then the pharmaceutical companies will want to buy it all out. Atleast that's what I think. It's already a pretty popular cash crop, but what if you need a permit to grow?

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If it becomes legalized then the pharmaceutical companies will want to buy it all out. Atleast that's what I think. It's already a pretty popular cash crop, but what if you need a permit to grow?

Why would it be a problem if the pharmaceutical companies bought all of it so long as they' didn't also monopolize the pool of growers producing it? All that would mean is that already established companies will be selling medicine to people with good quality control, all the while independent growers are also getting paid. You probably would ( and should ) need a permit to grow large quantities needed for this kind of commercialized production, but I think most states would probably legalize smaller sized grows for personal use.

 

Overall though I don't know why most Americans are really resistant to this legislation... Well, actually I do, because they aren't the least bit aware of the fact that this would do nothing at all to actually hinder the "War on Drugs" in terms of its effectiveness--or lack thereof. Realistically speaking, all it would do is take the federal governments hand out of the pot and leave it up to the states, most of which already have their own legislation regarding the laws. I suppose the argument could be that without federal funding or a DEA presence they wouldn't be able to as effectively fight it, and once again it would then spiral into an argument discussing whether spending all this money is even worth funding such a large and ineffective force, which will once again bring on the, "Oh, so we should just give up?" idea and all that so I don't really know that we're really going to convince law makers that removing the federal jurisdiction over it is a good thing, and I don't think it's even going to occur to the majority of the general public why removing that federal jurisdiction would largely do nothing but free up resources that are currently being squandered on something the states themselves could be handling.

 

I think LEAP is a nice organization to see coming to light, but I'm not sure they or Ron Paul are going to accomplish something so soon. However, it does show something good, which is that law enforcement themselves are getting sick of risking their lives and the lives of other people over something like this. The only problem is the DEA is in direct opposition to them, and that's not a battle I think they are even close to winning at this point.

 

One of the key things about the War on Drugs that I think isn't addressed enough is the DEA. Oh sure, wasting all the money, the resources, filling jails with non-violent offenders, and all the "collateral damage" the "War on Drugs" has caused should be reason enough, but one thing I don't think the LEAP is addressing and that they really should is that the DEA is not a fair and balanced organization and that when it comes to them and the way they enforce drugs our country's systems of checks and balances is in severe disrepair. They can pretty much control the laws at the federal level and disregard state law with impunity, while all the while there's a very clear and inherent conflict of interest there.

 

At the very least it at least shows the tides changing, and shows that there are a lot of people tired of the federal involvement.

Edited by SagaciousKJB

QUOTE (K^2) ...not only is it legal for you to go around with a concealed penis, it requires absolutely no registration!

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lil weasel

smile.gif Imagine you getting a year in jail for smoking a cigarette in public and your friend only gets a fine for doing a joint. biggrin.gif

A lot of cops, lawyers and judges (all over the country) will lose a cry.gif tax free side income if it's legalized. Clear profits from stolen evidence.

sarcasm.gif It would also be one less topic for re-election.

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CryptReaperDorian

How many years is mandatory sentencing here in the United States? Isn't it ten years? Anyways, it infuriates me that people that aren't acting violently are spending a decade in prison, and also that releases much more dangerous people earlier. It can only be good if marijuana is legalized. If the market can sell marijuana for decent prices, then the drug dealers (who are potentially dangerous) will hopefully lose profit. We all have read the news and have seen it in the media, and it's clear what happens in black market. Either the dealer or buyer feels screwed over, and then somebody gets shot for very stupid reasons.

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Well legalizing weed can't stop the war on drugs. Still got to do something about them f*cking meth addicts.

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darthYENIK

Despite marijuana not yet being completely legal, I'm happy with the progress that is happening in my state concerning it. Not only is it becoming more widely accepted on a social level, but more politicians and law enforcement personnel are also realizing the utter stupidity of a prohibition. Besides the fact that it's much more safe than we were told in the last 70 years, a lot of the people getting serious jail time are not bad people. They are people like Tommy Chong who went to prison for selling a bong(did not intend to rhyme that). Or the kid down the street that had just a bit too much weed on him at a party and went down for possession with intent to sell.

 

It's coming. Maybe not in the near future, but soon enough it will be legal. At least in some states.

Edited by darthYENIK
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You have to realize that police are not here to stop crime, they are here to make revenue for the state. That's why they pass by the meth lab, three dead hookers, and a local gang shootout to go and arrest someone speeding too fast, or smoking a joint.

 

Further more they use very little judgement, they fire first and think later.

That's why I call them State Funded Murderers. That's what police are.

 

They are only concerned with filling their quota and the prisons. They don't care WHO they put in there, even if it is just innocent civilians.

Just realize, nation-wide there are more of us citizens than there are of them and they can't arrest us all and throw us all in jail, then they wouldn't have a country and powers to abuse.

The real problem is the citizens are complacent and do not fight back - united as one.

 

If Every citizen, nation wide, rioted with weapons in hand (IE: Revolution) we would win, simple as that.

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Bowserchomp

Yes, I really wish this damn country would get cannabis de facto legalized soon.

 

Prohibition leads to suffering. And is fueled by greed and hatred.

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