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David Cameron blasts G8 summit.


AlexGTAGamer

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AlexGTAGamer

The English PM David Cameron has criticised the G8 summit comrades as "men in suits" enjoying "a good meal", he also confronted the US, France, Germany, Italy, Japan, Russia and Canada twice on a £12billion shortfall in their pledges on the last day of the economic powers' summit.

 

David Cameron and Nicholas Sarkozy will also be going to Libya to talk with the Libyan Rebels.

 

EDIT: Better news sources:

 

http://www.guardian.co.uk/politics/2011/ma...-defends-aid-g8

 

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/worldnews/...d-spending.html

 

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-politics-13572427

Edited by AlexGTAGamer
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sivispacem

I had forgotten quite how crap The Sun's reporting is. Thanks for reminding me.

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What illness did to me:

 

"James Cameron blasts E3 summit"

 

I was wondering if it had something to do with some long neglected Titanic game. Much too long after my initial confusion I understood it correctly.

 

Rown rampage_ani.gif

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I agree, at least link to a mildly reputable source rather than a tabloid for people who can't read more than 4 words in a sentence.

 

Also, that comment coming from David Cameron is rather hypocritical, isn't that pretty much all he's done apart from cut public services too severely ( in my opinion) and try to destroy the NHS?

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Adam Jensen

I tried to care about politics and stupid tabloid stuff but my care box is empty.

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sivispacem

 

Also, that comment coming from David Cameron is rather hypocritical, isn't that pretty much all he's done apart from cut public services too severely ( in my opinion) and try to destroy the NHS?

Very shaky and subjective ground there, particularly in relation to the latter comment. Tell me, how is increased private sector involvement in the NHS (not a new thing by any stretch of the imagination, as public-private collaboration has existed for a good decade now) anything other than good? I've had the misfortune of working closely with NHS middle management in the past and I've yet to find a single institution so backwards, disorganised, overfunded and underproductive. Seriously, razing it to the ground and starting again would result in a marked improvement.

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Also, that comment coming from David Cameron is rather hypocritical, isn't that pretty much all he's done apart from cut public services too severely ( in my opinion) and try to destroy the NHS?

Very shaky and subjective ground there, particularly in relation to the latter comment. Tell me, how is increased private sector involvement in the NHS (not a new thing by any stretch of the imagination, as public-private collaboration has existed for a good decade now) anything other than good? I've had the misfortune of working closely with NHS middle management in the past and I've yet to find a single institution so backwards, disorganised, overfunded and underproductive. Seriously, razing it to the ground and starting again would result in a marked improvement.

Personally I don't really see what's wrong with the NHS at the moment, apart from the fact that having a world class free health service cost's a lot of money, but there are surely better ways to save money than completely restructuring the whole system, it may just be needed to made more efficient. Drawing in the private sector will turn the whole system into a competitive market. Our health system should be for the patients not cooperation's to make a profit of, also without standardised healthcare patients could receive better or worse treatment just because of the different companies in charge. It just shows favouritism to the middle-classes and means the less desirable patients to treat will get less attention just because of the doctor deciding who he wants to see.

 

Anyway this isn't really the place for a political debate and I have driven this completely off topic...

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sivispacem

 

Personally I don't really see what's wrong with the NHS at the moment, apart from the fact that having a world class free health service cost's a lot of money, but there are surely better ways to save money than completely restructuring the whole system, it may just be needed to made more efficient. Drawing in the private sector will turn the whole system into a competitive market. Our health system should be for the patients not cooperation's to make a profit of, also without standardised healthcare patients could receive better or worse treatment just because of the different companies in charge. It just shows favouritism to the middle-classes and means the less desirable patients to treat will get less attention just because of the doctor deciding who he wants to see.

 

Anyway this isn't really the place for a political debate and I have driven this completely off topic...

Competition promotes innovation. One of the principal reasons why our health service has stagnated over the last 30 or so years is because there has been no drive for innovation or increased productivity. Statistically, we have the least productive health service in Europe. We spend more than double the amount per capita per anumn than countries such as Germany and France, for a significantly lower quality of care, longer waiting times and higher fatality rates from cancers, post-operative complications and long-term illnesses. The issue is the hugely bloated middle-management sector, the entire PCT system if you will, who are tied into incredibly long-term contracts with the NHS from day one, gain bonuses in no way related to performance and who are essentially impossible to sack without them committing some heinous crime. Very few of them actually come from the healthcare sector in the first place, which basically means that the majority of those in management-level positions have only a cursory understanding of the structure and operation of the NHS as an institution, get paid handsomely regardless of performance and are nigh-on impossible to remove from their roles. A more than doubling in expenditure on the NHS since 1992 has seen only a minute increase in overall productivity. That suggests something is fundamentally wrong with the institution.

 

There's absolutely no evidence to suggest that it promotes favouritism, or produces a postcode lottery across the country. Most Western healthcare systems- including the UK as it currently stands- have a provision for private sector involvement. This isn't a case of letting the Private sector have free reign to nit-pick what services they wish to provide, or what level of care they want avalible to the population. The fact that the private sector needs to be able to demostrate they can exceed existing quality of care in any sector they apply for before they can even try and tender for it (according to the proposed legislation) means that this idea of proposed NHS reforms resulting in a "two-tier" or "lowest-bidder" health service are just absurd scaremongering.

 

Back on topic, the principal issue with the G8 countries is a lack of consensus. They are so different in their political, social and economic structure that it is nearly impossible for any kind of consensus to be achieved. It's a classic case of the interests of the individual nations trumping the collective interests of the group, as is so often the case in international relations.

 

EDIT- Interesting to note how neither the Guardian or the Telegraph article bear any real resemblance to the Sun one in terms of their content or main points...

Edited by sivispacem

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sivispacem

 

Yes, Mr. Cameron. Shame on them! It's not like you would do something like...spend £680,000 of taxpayer's money on doing up your kitchen, right?

 

Oh, wait. You did.

 

Yay for the "Big Society"!

Link to Cabinet Office document. However, the headlines are absurdly misleading. They imply that the £680k was spent directly on accomodation for the Cameron family. In actuality, the anual £30k upkeep budget (one of the perks of being PM) was spent on renovating the flat in which the family actually live, with the rest of the money going on reonvations for the rest of the property, which isn't actually lived in but is used for diplomatic and official purposes.

 

So, a more accurate headline would be "government spends £650k on diplomatic property and £30k on improving the Cameron's housing". Doesn't seem quite so sensational now, does it? Conveniently, most of the articles only give this fact a cursory mention. Still, it goes to show you the power of a headline. Especially when you don't actually read the bloody article underneath it.

 

 

No 10 has confirmed that the full £30,000 grant for upkeep of the living accommodation, which is available to prime ministers annually, was used for the refit of 11 Downing Street, after the Guardian discovered the payment in the official spending records...

 

...The other £653,192.34 was spent on external and internal renovation of the offices and reception rooms in Downing Street, including cabling, plumbing and energy efficiency improvements.

 

Whatsmore, £700k a year on upkeep for a Grade I listed property is bloody cheap. Most Grade I properties cost upwards of £1.5m a year just to keep ticking over...

Edited by sivispacem

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General Goose

Re the G8 thing and the whole foreign aid debacle; I for one think the media has been blowing this issue out of proportion. If you believe the Daily Mail, foreign aid has gone up 200% and now is half of our budget. And while there is waste and corruption in the Department for International Development, and I wish David Cameron would focus on that some more, the Daily Mail makes very little mention of the fact that international aid does play a role in helping promote our economic, political and social interests abroad, and that it will help us create a world favourable to our interests. And, while I hate the man's guts, kudos for him for calling out the G8 on this. Some of them, like Italy, have appalling records on the issue, and a vast majority have broken their promises. In a time of global economic strife and massive political change in the Arab world, foreign aid is not something to be ignored.

 

However, I too am annoyed with the timing of David Cameron's rise in foreign aid. While a good foreign aid budget is important, I would much rather have the government services I care about and low tuition fees. I would much rather our government gone with a more reasoned, slower approach to cuts, and also not been so bloody lenient on multinational companies and their tax avoidance (and in some cases evasion).

 

Re the planned healthcare reforms: I'm not going to say I outright oppose them, as his proposed reforms do contain some decent ideas. I do oppose privatisation of the NHS and I oppose the sudden abolition of PCTs and the whole scale of reform, particularly in a time of austerity, however the encouragement of extra competition and greater freedom for NHS patients to choose the specifics of treatment and combine NHS care with private care are both things I can support. As a whole though, I'm wary of any reform. Labour's PFI schemes and their miserable attempt at making a national IT system were both costly and ineffectual.

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