Jump to content

English Language


Ronnyboy

Recommended Posts

Why is that in the english laguage there are shorten versions of words. With words such as I'm our You're are just using an apostrophe to replace a letter. While some times it makes since to make a shorter word, such as in You'd. It still seems like an excuse to make words shorter. I mean is it that hard to put an "a" in You're? Seriously, it just makes no sense to replace a letter with just a small apostrophe.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Mike Tequeli

Shortening words is a natural process in language that makes talking easier and more simplified. Shortened words happen and they rightly should most of the time.

user posted image
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Shortening words is a natural process in language that makes talking easier and more simplified. Shortened words happen and they rightly should most of the time.

But it just shows laziness. I mean are you that lazy you cant type a letter, so you decide to add a little character? I mean yes it is easier, but why is it so hard to a letter/letters to a word?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Quadropheniac90

It's not lazy, it's easy. And for speech too. I wouldn't say I would not in a conversation...

user posted image
Link to comment
Share on other sites

But it just shows laziness. I mean are you that lazy you cant type a letter, so you decide to add a little character? I mean yes it is easier, but why is it so hard to a letter/letters to a word?

Shortening a word is easier not lazy, because it would save you two secconds to just write "you're" instead of "you are" (yeah I'm lazy! turn.gif )

user posted image
Link to comment
Share on other sites

 

Shortening words is a natural process in language that makes talking easier and more simplified. Shortened words happen and they rightly should most of the time.

But it just shows laziness. I mean are you that lazy you cant type a letter, so you decide to add a little character? I mean yes it is easier, but why is it so hard to a letter/letters to a word?

These are known as contractions.

 

I use contractions in my writing regularly to exhibit a "casual" likeness that many people have in speech. To me, spelling everything out sounds extremely formal. Using contractions for me is just another way to be jovial, relaxed, non-chalant, or leisurely. Because writing does not carry the same connotations that speech does, what with body language and inflection, contractions are sometimes necessary to not be misinterpreted, especially if you're attempting to affix feeling to writing.

 

Contractions can be used in text to send subtle cues that body language or inflection would cover in speech, but are not easily replicated in writing otherwise. For example, a person may say, "Wow, that hill is a doosey, I just can't ski it." However, if they instead say, "Wow, that hill is a doosey, I just can not ski it," it conveys a sense of emphasis or intensity to the reader. With speech you could just as easily do this by adding a slight inflection when you say "can not", but it is much more necessary to use contractions for this in writing. If for example you wrote it as, "Wow, that hill is a doosey, I just can't ski it!" it would give it a feel of intensity, but it would do so for the entire statement, instead of just for the one focal point.

 

However, despite this usage of contractions, their intended purpose was never to be used in speech, but to cut down on how many letters you had to write back in the days of pen and paper. A writer's hand could be very cramped, and contractions were a convenient way to cut down on this cramping but still remain comprehensible. If you've ever written a lot by hand, you probably know how excruciating it can be to write even a single letter after a while; so typically the people that would most often use this were authors that were writing novels. It is not as if they would get tired half way through a book and then start adding in contractions, they would intentionally write in shortened form like this so that their hand wasn't too cramped to write in the important details and so that they could write for as long as possible. Typically only literature, editorials, and informal writing was done in this fashion, which is why today it is considered formal not to use them.

 

Now days with the advent of typewriters, the contraction really offers no time-saving or cramp-saving abilities, and in my opinion is generally adopted by most as an implicit mechanism to suggest or convey intensity, formality, leisure, or other effects that could not otherwise be managed with writing. I think that they are also increasingly being adopted in speech by the generally monotone in nature, or over the phone when body language can not be interpreted.

 

What's interesting to me is how contractions have changed to be used exclusively in speech. For example, "it was" use to be contracted to "'twas" in writing, and reverted back to the full form. However, what I've noticed is that some people have used sound-contractions on this word. A person might say "it'as" ( rhymes with bit-fuzz ) by contracting the actual sounds of language, but it would be incompatible in text due to the rules of the English language, and would probably be misinterpreted as "it has". Interestingly enough however, from what I've heard, we've also learned how to use inflection along with sound-contraction in speech, because with just a slight inflection in speech "it'as" could go from "it was" to "it has". In essence, we've created a form of contractions that works based on the rules of sound and not on the rules of English.

QUOTE (K^2) ...not only is it legal for you to go around with a concealed penis, it requires absolutely no registration!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

ILovePolarBears

Is it lazy to not dress up for work on your days off?

 

Contractions are casual; we use them so we don't come across as pretentious.

 

I generally only avoid contractions in formal writing, where you're supposed to.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

 

Why is that in the english laguage there are shorten versions of words.

In regards to your point about laziness: is it that f*cking hard to use a capital and question mark?

 

P.S. Language; shortened.

 

P.P.S. "Why is that [...]" doesn't make sense.

vbSWr1A.gif


Link to comment
Share on other sites

This is not unique to the English language. However, it is more apparent to the English language. Other languages (including my native tongue (Danish)) have several contraction, but usually these do not make it into writing. The unique thing about English is that it makes its way into writing.

 

In Danish, it is even common for entire words to vanish, but they still appear in writing. The only time we write as we speak can be in dialogue where it is important or song texts, where the amount of syllables are important for a tune.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
  • 1 User Currently Viewing
    0 members, 0 Anonymous, 1 Guest

×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

By using GTAForums.com, you agree to our Terms of Use and Privacy Policy.