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PSU blown?


Suction Testicle Man

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Suction Testicle Man

I took my computer case on a 2 hour car journey to the new house yesterday, only to find on arrival that the damn thing didn't want things to work quite so easily. Basic symptoms are the following:

 

• Press power button.

• Computer powers on (cpu fan, case fan, gfx fan, all the normal lights come on, etc.)

• Computer turns off (after around half a second - pretty much as I pull finger away from power button)

• Motherboard power LED remains lit, but computer can't be turned on again unless PSU is turned off and on again.

 

My guess is the PSU is at fault here, but I'm not certain of this. It seems to be making a quiet yet unhealthy whirring noise when powered on, but whether it didn't do this before I haven't a clue (whole computer was powered on pretty much 24/7). It's as if the supply can't manage to keep the whole system running and konks out. I've checked all connections, nothing was unplugged in the move. The power button isn't sticking either (tried turning on with a jumper as a test).

 

The PSU is a Hiper 480w Type-R (I know, sounds like a badly tuned Honda), and inspection of the Hiper website tells me that an RMA requires proof of purchase. Obviously I don't have the receipt after buying it a year and a half ago, and I really can't afford £60 for a new one. Getting this one going would be ideal.

 

Thanks for any help.

If at first you don't succeed, you fail, and the test will be terminated.

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It may not be necessarily blown, but maybe one of your components has shorted in some way and is now drawing more power than when you originally set the rig up; or perhaps you've recently added new hardware. Have you tried trouble-shooting down to just the essential components to see if it will stay powered on?

 

If you have a Phillips screwdriver, open up the PSU after it's been powered down for a while. There might be some potential for shock in there if it's actually blown, but they probably fix that on new models; I remember back one time one of mine blew up, I opened it up, and got a nice shock. I assume it was from one of the capacitors that must've have just been charging up too much or something. In any case, I'd just examine the inside of that very carefully. Maybe there's too much dust inside of it, and the heat is tripping it. If there's burns, or the thing blew out, that should be pretty visible.

 

Just googled the model reviews to see if there's any crash reports

 

http://www.extremeoverclocking.com/reviews...peR_480W_2.html

 

 

Manufacturer's Features & Specifications:

 

    * 530 Watt peak power

    * 20 and 24 pins compatible

    * Full ATX 2.2 compliance

    * PCI-E cable

    * Supports ATX up to v2.2 & Intel BTX configuration.

    * Complies with all Intel & AMD CPU specification requirement.

    * Gold Plated connector, preventing rust & bad connection.

    * EZ-Grip Molex connector.

 

    * Power Train:

          o 480Watt continuous output. (Peak Load 530 watts)

          o Newest ATX 2.2 with 2 x 12V connection

    * Chassis:

          o Full 1.0 mm Japanese Steel

          o Complete Mesh Body

          o Mat Black Finish

    * Cooling System:

          o Active Thermal Controlled Circuitry.

          o 120 mm Long Life Fan.

          o Power-Off Component Protection design.

                + Note: 120mm fan will stay on for a few minutes after shutdown to vacate additional hot air.

    * Power Delivery:

          o CE/TUV Grade Cables

          o Gold Plated Connector Pins

          o Braided Power Cables

          o EZ On/Off Connectors

          o Serial ATA Connector

    * Stability System:

          o Active Power Factor Correction. (Non-US Models)

    * Electrical Protection:

          o Over Voltage Protection Circuitry

          o Over Current Protection Circuitry

          o Short Circuit Protection Circuitry

 

 

Soo, 530 at peak seems like it would cover a lot, but the temps are probably getting pretty high up there. I would assume this is just an over-heating problem and start from there for now.

 

Edit

 

Well, maybe I spoke too soon

 

http://www.extremeoverclocking.com/reviews...peR_480W_7.html

 

 

Now, on to the bad part. When attempting to overload the PSU and force it to shutdown from an over current situation, the OCP circuitry did not kick in. Instead the voltages just kept dropping, and the current draw peaked around 880W (measured at the AC plug). In theory a PC would not attempt to draw that much current, but you never know what could happen in a faulty situation. As a result of the failed over current attempt, I think either the field transistors or Schottky rectifiers might have been damaged. There was no "catastrophic failure" (i.e. the PSU did not explode), however the PSU now makes a horrible shrieking sound when it is initially powered on, and consumes consistently about 20% more power than it should under the standardized load levels. I've had Seasonic & other power supplies react similar to not shutting down, but this is was the first that resulted in damage. In all honesty I forgot to check the 580W model to see if it would shutdown, I only tested up to the rated peak of 630W. Seeing as how the designs are similar, it would be a reasonable assumption to guess that it would react the same, however with the higher current capable components it might not result in any permanent damage to the PSU.
Edited by SagaciousKJB

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My idea isn't as in depth as Sag's and may sound kind of dumb, you might have already tried it even. But maybe the outlet you're plugging it into can't handle the load? Try another if you haven't.

Picolini is now Pico

 

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I had a similar issue, in my case the motherboard was shorted due to a screw that fell behind the motherboard.

 

If you have a multimeter, I would check the PSU to make sure your getting the right voltages.

 

If the PSU is good, I would try removing the motherboard and putting back in, then re-seat everything, including the CPU.

 

Hope everything works out.

 

On a side note my PSU blew out, and SilverStone gave me a RMA number immediately, check the warranty on the PSU also.

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Suction Testicle Man

Thanks for the research Sag, I've tried building it back from scratch but unforunately to no avail. Exact same problem even with only the motherboard plugged in. The noise it's making is more of a whirr than a shriek, more like a bit of dust rubbing the fan as it spins I've decided (not enough to slow down the fan, mind).

 

Picolini - good tip, I'm running off of an ancient power adapter and thought that might be the problem before. Alas, it was not.

 

Primer43 - interesting, I'll take everything out the case and give it all a good clean and reassemble in case something is shorting it. I don't have a multimeter, and I don't know off hand what the voltages could be - that would take more research. tounge.gif As I've said regarding RMAs, that's an option, but I don't have the receipt so they won't take it back.

 

If cleaning it all fails to give any results, I'll have to put in an email demanding Hiper take back the unit. I'm blaming them for everything, so they can jolly well give me a new one. And if that fails.. I guess it's ebay time. confused.gif

 

Edit: Also, I suppose should I need to buy a new one, if anyone can find me a good deal (cheapo) on a similar PSU that'd be grand. I'm looking around, but they're all a bit dear. This one was fine until it broke (or whatever), so anything around 500W with two +12v rails, both 18amp or above.

If at first you don't succeed, you fail, and the test will be terminated.

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If you have to call Hiper, just explain to them, usually they are fine with it. I didn't even need to give them (SilverStone) a receipt.

 

I wouldn't go "cheapo" on a PSU, although my (supposedly high end) PSU blew. notify.gif

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Voltages table:

 

 

Output Tension     Tolerance            Min              Max+5VDC                  ±5%              +4,75V         +5,25V+12VDC                 ±5%             +11,40V        +12,60V-5VDC                  ±10%             -4,5V          -5,5V-12VDC                 ±10%            -10,8V          -13,2V+3,3VDC                ±5%             +3,14V          +3,47V+5V SB                 ±5%              +4,75V         +5,25V

 

 

Keep it somewhere safe.

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Suction Testicle Man

Gave it a good clean and checked for possible shorts, but it still refuses to work. Can't ring Hiper until Monday morning, so will do that then. If they say no to an RMA, then I'll take Sag's advice and open it up to look for blown capacitors etc. Thanks all, and Saget for the table.

If at first you don't succeed, you fail, and the test will be terminated.

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Gave it a good clean and checked for possible shorts, but it still refuses to work. Can't ring Hiper until Monday morning, so will do that then. If they say no to an RMA, then I'll take Sag's advice and open it up to look for blown capacitors etc. Thanks all, and Saget for the table.

If you decide to open it, first make sure the capacitors are discharged, I think you need to ground the red wire (+5V I think) before you stick your hand inside. Or just unplug it from everything and wait a day or two. I forgot to do that once and got a nasty shock, my whole arm was twitching for the rest of the day. nervous.gif

 

Also, where do you live? I bought myself a Nikao Cool Power 500W for around $80, now it's even cheaper, and it's amazing for the price. One 12v rail of 36A, more than enough for me, it's silent, and the massive 140mm LED fan lights up the whole case. You don't actually need dual 12v rails, it's essentially just a marketing gimmick. Read this, from the manufacturer of the best PSUs money can buy. http://www.pcpower.com/technology/myths/

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Suction Testicle Man

Thanks for the tip Rocketkiller, but I've managed to negotiate the head of their RMA department into making a special case for me despite having no proof of purchase. It's all about being a jolly nice chap on the telephone. Bad news is I got ahold of a smaller PSU just to see if anything else was playing up, and now the computer turns on, but doesn't make a boot-up beep noise, or show anything on the monitor. The monitor is receiving a feed, but it's all very dead. Bleh, I was due for an upgrade anyway, but not this soon. confused.gif

If at first you don't succeed, you fail, and the test will be terminated.

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Thanks for the tip Rocketkiller, but I've managed to negotiate the head of their RMA department into making a special case for me despite having no proof of purchase. It's all about being a jolly nice chap on the telephone. Bad news is I got ahold of a smaller PSU just to see if anything else was playing up, and now the computer turns on, but doesn't make a boot-up beep noise, or show anything on the monitor. The monitor is receiving a feed, but it's all very dead. Bleh, I was due for an upgrade anyway, but not this soon. confused.gif

It's good you received an RMA. As for the monitor, maybe over voltage knocked out your PSU and monitor? I would test the processor in someones else's computer, if it works your motherboard probably is dead... confused.gif

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The PSU blowing probably caused a voltage spike that took out your video card, CPU, RAM or motherboard. Could be anything really, but I'm leaning more towards motherboard because it doesn't even beep. Usually an error with something else will cause some beeping.

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