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Worlds fastest internet connection


LT.Diablo
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Sigbritt, 75, has world's fastest broadband

 

Published: 12th July 2007 11:07 CET

 

A 75 year old woman from Karlstad in central Sweden has been thrust into the IT history books - with the world's fastest internet connection.

 

Sigbritt Löthberg's home has been supplied with a blistering 40 Gigabits per second connection, many thousands of times faster than the average residential link and the first time ever that a home user has experienced such a high speed.

 

But Sigbritt, who had never had a computer until now, is no ordinary 75 year old. She is the mother of Swedish internet legend Peter Löthberg who, along with Karlstad Stadsnät, the local council's network arm, has arranged the connection.

 

"This is more than just a demonstration," said network boss Hafsteinn Jonsson.

 

"As a network owner we're trying to persuade internet operators to invest in faster connections. And Peter Löthberg wanted to show how you can build a low price, high capacity line over long distances," he told The Local.

 

Sigbritt will now be able to enjoy 1,500 high definition HDTV channels simultaneously. Or, if there is nothing worth watching there, she will be able to download a full high definition DVD in just two seconds.

 

The secret behind Sigbritt's ultra-fast connection is a new modulation technique which allows data to be transferred directly between two routers up to 2,000 kilometres apart, with no intermediary transponders.

 

According to Karlstad Stadsnät the distance is, in theory, unlimited - there is no data loss as long as the fibre is in place.

 

"I want to show that there are other methods than the old fashioned ways such as copper wires and radio, which lack the possibilities that fibre has," said Peter Löthberg, who now works at Cisco.

 

Cisco contributed to the project but the point, said Hafsteinn Jonsson, is that fibre technology makes such high speed connections technically and commercially viable.

 

"The most difficult part of the whole project was installing Windows on Sigbritt's PC," said Jonsson.

 

 

Linky

 

Amazing, I wonder if everyone will have a connection like this in 20 or so years?

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If everyone says Meh this is good enough for me, we'll still be in the stoneage tounge.gif

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I did have a problem when I had 56k, it was slow as sh*t. So I upgraded and now its as good as I want, so theres no point on wasting money on something I don't need.

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Sigbritt will now be able to enjoy 1,500 high definition HDTV channels simultaneously. Or, if there is nothing worth watching there, she will be able to download a full high definition DVD in just two seconds.

 

Quick somebody get her on bittorrent user posted image

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her internet is 20 times faster than me mad.gif

Assuming someone has a 1Mbitps connection, that would be about 40,000 times slower than what the old lady has.

 

40,000,000,000 bits vs. 1,000,000 bits - 40Gbits vs 1Mbit. or 4x10^10 vs 10^6

 

20 times slower than the old lady would mean that you have a 2,000,000,000 bit connection or 2Gbitsps connection wow.gif.

 

My connection is maxed at 20Mbitsps at the moment meaning that my connection is about 2000 times slower than hers. tounge.gif

 

Unless you meant that your physical speed is about 2Gbitsps in the real world, to which I would say WTF?

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Fozzy Fozborne

Too bad no one's single hard drive is anywhere near that fast. Even the burst speed of the drive is only 300MBps/3 Gbps on SATA 2. That means that she'd have to have at least 14 hard drives to use it all on BURST speed, not to mention that drives can't transfer from the disc that fast.

 

She must have some crazy RAID on that computer to actually use 40 Gbps download.

 

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Too bad no one's single hard drive is anywhere near that fast. Even the burst speed of the drive is only 300MBps/3 Gbps on SATA 2. That means that she'd have to have at least 14 hard drives to use it all on BURST speed, not to mention that drives can't transfer from the disc that fast.

 

She must have some crazy RAID on that computer to actually use 40 Gbps download.

that brings up another question, what kind of networking equipment is she using dontgetit.gif

 

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1mb(megabit) is about 125 kiloBytes. Therefore, based on 1MB(Byte) being 1024 kiloBytes, it is about 8.192 Mb per every 1MB. Therefore if she a 300MBps hard drive read speed, she could max out (with nothing else considered) at 2457.6Mbps or 2.4576Gbps. Thus at that read speed, she would need at least another 17 drives ph34r.gif at 300MBps to save all of the data from her stream, Then again, she isn't necessarily using all of the connection at once and we don't know if she is downloading any grandpa pRon either. She would probably need more drives for storage so they could have their own set of bandwidth. That is a massive temporary set of hard drives. Now for the 3Gbps drives, she would need at least 14 drives ph34r.gif plus extra for storage and OS etc., She must have super AC and alot of room in her home to store all that equipment. Imagine all the ram, processors and power along with SATA RAID cards that are needed for the setup. Unless I am not comprehending something right.

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Fozzy Fozborne

@Six, that's what I was thinking in my earlier post.

 

Don't the latest routers and cards top out at 1 gbps (two if you have dual network cards connected to your router)?

 

So... 20 (or 40) routers and 20/40 network cards connected to a PC that's running at least 14 hard drives at burst speed (disk read performance varies, but it's about 50 to 100MBPS now). That would never be economical to any home user no matter how much they want faster internet. Think of the power consumption! Unless it's some kind of server board with 14 hard drive slots (including expansion cards) and 20/40 network ports, there is no way that she'll be able to use it all. It's a shame really.

 

Another thought, what if you ran a speedtest? that'd bring the entire server to its knees as it struggles to supply you with 40Gbps of bandwidth. You could crash the entire internet! Brilliant!!!

 

Random idea: who thinks we should eliminate the bits measurement all together? I think that'd be a great idea because it would lead to a lot less confusion when talking especially about internet speed. Many people don't understand that 6Mbps means bits, so about 600 KBps speed. Most casual users don't care about bits, they want to know how fast that (legal) 4 megabyte song will take.

Edited by Fozzy Fozborne
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UnitedDestruction

As our internet connections grow faster, the content becomes larger. pretty funny actually. EX: HD Movies, larger video games, richer web pages (flash, java, all that great stuff). Hopefully the fast internet develops/spreads faster though.

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Wow, some of the posts here are mind boggling, crashing the internet tounge2.gif. So, in theory, is it possible to have internet this speed, in say, 10 years, providing that technology has progressed enough to allow it plausibly?

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Yes, however she'll never get the full 40gb/s now. The fastest I've seen is 1000Mbit/s and most file hosters have about 120-600mb/s

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Internet connection varies on many things. First your up and down speed, which we can tell she have a lot of. Then the host you are downloading from, which usually only goes up to 1gbit, or around there. So the 40gbit will only be nice for downloading a lot from different hosts at the same time.

 

But also, when downloading, you'll have to have a harddisk with enough rpm to write that data as fast as you get it. Otherwise, it will clog up in your buffer, RAM or simply put the data on hold from the host.

 

But again, it was just a demonstration...

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So much porn so little time..

Way of coping someone's comment from digg.com (unless that someone was you, or you both said the same thing.)

 

Anyways, if anyone took the time to read the article, her grandson (or son, whatever), is a telecomm guy with lots of money. He wanted to prove that there are cheap ways to set up long distance fiber cable connections, or something like that. So, it isn't really OMG 31337 Granny.

 

 

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@Six, that's what I was thinking in my earlier post.

 

Don't the latest routers and cards top out at 1 gbps (two if you have dual network cards connected to your router)?

 

1 gbps?

Not commercial routing systems. Companies are already running at 10Gbps on most backhaul points.

 

In fact a fully loaded 28 frame Cisco CRS can accomodate ~ 4Tbps* in the switching fabric

 

Also, you will never use all of your utilization at higher speeds, as TCP is a receive/send protocol, with a sliding MTU.

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Fozzy Fozborne

I meant latest consumer routing systems. I'm sure NASA has a terabyte per millisecond server, but how would she get her 40Gbps internet routed into her (presumably massive) computer? Do they sell network cards that support that much bandwidth (PCI-X maybe?) to businesses that need that kind of bandwidth?

 

That would also mean that the huge server would have to be in her house to be able to run at full speed.

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