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Music Trivia: Interesting Facts & Stories

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Mister Pink
  • Mister Pink

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#1

Posted 4 weeks ago Edited by Mister Pink, 4 weeks ago.

The Beatles, love them or hate them were sort of credited as the first band to use the studio as instrument. It wasn't just a tool to record it was could be used creatively. Them and their engineers pioneered a lot of production techniques that were just completely unheard of and we sort of take them for granted now. 

 

"The final version of Strawberry Fields Forever was created combining two takes of the song in two different keys and speeds - a remarkable achievement considering the equipment and technology of the time - but still failed to fully satisfy Lennon."

 

"Reverse tape effect on the guitar solo of “I’m Only Sleeping” On this John Lennon tune from Revolver (1966) George Harrison spent a reported five hours meticulously constructing a guitar part by having the engineers run the tape backwards as he composed a solo that would ultimately, when reversed, “fit the dreamlike mood"

 

More here

https://theproaudiof...ion-techniques/

 

Other Trivia: 

 

Sweet Home Alabama - Lynyrd Skynyrd.

 

Sweet Home Alabama by Lynyrd Skynyrd is a retaliation song to Neil Young's Southern Man. Not being content with Neil's depiction of the Southern Man and the racism that flourished in he confederate region. Skynyrd's answer to this was a love song to Alabama "where the skies are so blue."  You can also hear Skynyrd directly attack Neil Young in the song. 

 

"Well, I heard Mr. Young sing about her, I heard old Neil put her down. I hope Neil Young will remember: A southern man don't need him around, anyhow."

 

The name Lynyrd Skynyrd comes from their old high school PE teacher. His name was Leonard Skinner. Apparently he was a pain. 

 

Toni Iommi of Black Sabbath was in Jethro Tull for about 6 months. 

 

Coldplay's 'Talk' main riff is actually borrowed from German electronic music pioneer's Kraftwerk. The song it borrows from is Computer Love

 

Afrika Bambaata's electro-funk Hip Hop classic Planet Rock was created mainly by fusing two Krafwerk samples together from two of their tracks: Numbers and Trans Europe Express. 

 

Here's Karl Bartos of Kraftwerk explaining: "They ripped my beat off..bloody bastards!"

 

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Craig
  • Craig

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#2

Posted 4 weeks ago

Ooh, goody!

 

So, albums are fine. I like albums, BUT... I love albums within albums.

 

One example is by the band Tool. This album isn't technically anything new - it's more of a rearrangement of their 2001 album Lateralus. It's known as The Holy Gift and relies on the Fibonacci sequence. For clarification,  the Fibonacci sequence is a string of numbers beginning with 0 and 1 (or 1 and 1) where every next number in the sequence equals to the sum of the previous two numbers. Following that, the sequence would go 0, 1, 1, 2, 3, 5, 8 and so on.

 

Next, let's look at the syllables used in lyrics by vocalist Maynard Keenan. We'll use the title track as a reference.

 

Black (1)
Then (1)
White are (2)
All I see (3)
In my infancy (5)
Red and yellow then came to be (8)
Reaching out to me (5)
Lets me see (3)
There is (2)
So (1)
Much (1)
More and (2)
Beckons me (3)
To look through to these (5)
Infinite possibilities (8)
As below so above and beyond I imagine (13)
Drawn outside the lines of reason (8)

Push the envelope (5)

Watch it bend (3)

 

You'll notice that the same sequence is being repeated here. Although the Fibonacci sequence doesn't go backwards by definition, it's clear that the same pattern is being used both rising and falling. You'll also notice that the sequence peaks at number 13, which tallies up with the track listing of the album. Putting it simply, the secret of The Holy Gift is the reorganisation of songs in a pair of spirals with the number 13 in the middle. Below I have added the track listing for Lateralus so you can play along at home.

 

1. The Grudge 

2. Eon Blue Apocalypse 

3. The Patient 

4. Mantra 

5. Schism 

6. Parabol 

7. Parabola 

8. Ticks & Leeches 

9. Lateralus 

10. Disposition 

11. Reflection 

12. Triad 

13. Faaip De Oiad

 

The first pair of the sequence is "Parabol" & "Parabola," tracks number 6 and 7 (13/2 = 6.5), the latter of which features a line. What does this line say? "Recognise this as a holy gift." Here is a quote from a fan who listened to it:

 

 

 

The transition from "Parabola" into "Schism" blew my mind, as the plucks, probably dismissed by listeners as a drawn out rant of an ending, perfectly transition into the beginning of "Schism"

When you count out beats as the strings are plucked, "Schism" resumes with the same time signature and tempo - mirroring the progression of notes. The transition from "Schism" into "Ticks & Leeches" is equally intriguing. "Schism" ends with strong double-kick bass and tom smacks, and "Ticks & Leeches" begins with what many would call a tribal drumbeat.

The beat at the very start of "Ticks & Leeches" is slightly different every subsequent time it is repeated - the measures are two beats longer. Yup - you guessed it - those two beats are ACTUALLY the last two beats of 'Schism.' I can honestly say that I never understood the album's fourth track, "Mantra" until reordering the album's songs. What I had originally heard as whale calls now had begun to resemble the worst imaginable dryheaves - or a stylized choking. Fitting, seeing as how the last line in "Ticks & Leeches" is "I hope you choke".

 

So, to clarify, the final track order is 6, 7, 5, 8, 4, 9, 13, 1, 12, 2, 11, 3, 10, or [6,7] [5,8] [4,9] [13] [1,12] [2,11] [3,10], which is a "triad" of pairs divided by a split - or "schism" - in the middle ("schism" is defined as a "a split or division between strongly opposed sections or parties, caused by differences in opinion or belief.") To put it another way:

 

6. Parabol
7. Parabola
5. Schism
8. Ticks & Leeches
4. Mantra
9. Lateralus
13. Faaip De Oiad
1. The Grudge
12. Triad
2. Eon Blue Apocalypse
11. Reflection

3. The Patient

10. Disposition

 

Does it work? Well, you tell me.

 

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Mister Pink
  • Mister Pink

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#3

Posted 4 weeks ago

That's brilliant. I actually had a Fibonacci sequence number as my member title for a couple weeks, after learning about it through graphic design course I was taking. 

 

Never listened to Tool, really. Might give that album a go. 

 

Recently, I learned that Johnny Marr lent a broke Noel Gallagher his guitar in the early Oasis days. Apparently he was still on social welfare. Marr got the guitar from Pete Townsend and then passed it on to Noel. 

 

Here's Marr explaining it.. 

 


Craig
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#4

Posted 3 weeks ago

I'm glad you posted, because I've got loads and otherwise it'd just be me blowing myself in this topic.

 

Everybody knows of the band Pink Floyd, whether you're a fan of them or not. From flags and posters in student bedrooms, to pathetic covers from 55 year olds at a bar and grill, it's hard to imagine a time when they weren't around. It feels like they've been making music forever... and in a way, there's something you can do to simulate that.

 

Y'see, there's this album they released in 1979 called The Wall, which is a sprawling concept double album that inspired a movie and a cult following all of its own. The track listing is daunting in itself, but there's something lurking that would send you right back to the beginning if you cared enough to try it. The last track of The Wall is called "Outside The Wall" and acts as a dénouement to the story. Other than that, there's not much else to it but if you listen closely to the spoken word segment towards the end you'll hear the words "isn't this where" just as the song abruptly stops. You'd be forgiven for thinking it was an editing error, or even missing it altogether if you hadn't already sunk into your beanbag.

 

The truth is, this is a direct link to the first track "In The Flesh" which begins with the words "we came in", closing the question and forming a near perfect loop. Bear in mind, that The Wall was released in the late 70s. There wasn't the technology to edit this as it was intended to be heard, at least not just sat in people's homes. You might even hear the two lines but seeing as the vinyl pressing didn't host a locked groove you would be hard pressed to get up immediately and change the record to confirm your suspicions.

 

Here is the entire message edited together. You'll notice how seamless the transition is. It was absolutely intended to be heard, but when it was first found I haven't the foggiest.

 

 

Speaking of secrets in The Wall, I've got another one for you. You may have heard of backmasking, which is the intentional insertion of a secret message that only makes sense when played in reverse. These are not to be confused with other so-called "subliminal messages" which are often accidental and purely coincidental. That's probably a good thing, because I doubt there's much business sense in recording a message backwards telling kids to kill their parents and then themselves. Backmasked messages are easy to miss, but when you know what to listen to you'll find the hairs sticking up on your arms - the warbled delivery, the eerie tone, it's enough to make you want to drop everything and find out what it says immediately. Well, it turns out there's a very deliberate one hidden in The Wall, more specifically in the song "Empty Spaces".

 

You'll hear it in the left channel of the song, just before the lyrical section. I'll add the message and its context in spoiler tags so you can play along at home.

 

Spoiler

 

This is the only known instance of a backmasked message from Pink Floyd, which is surprising because they strike me as the kind of band to pull this stuff all the time. Here is the video which plays the original song and then the reversed audio.

 


Craig
  • Craig

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#5

Posted 3 weeks ago

Forgive me for double posting but I love sharing little pieces of trivia and intricacies in music. Plus, you're all killing me - it's been five days! So, I'll go ahead with another. This album is The Matching Tie & Handkerchief released by the comedy group Monty Python.

 

MontyPythonMatchingTie%26HandkerchiefOri

 

Released in December 1973, this contained mostly new material in the form of comedy sketches, with some recycling from their Flying Circus series. However, one quirk this album possessed is the addition of a second concentric groove on the second side of the album. In other words, this meant that side B contained different material depending on where you put the needle on the record. Side A remained the same. It wasn't well publicised at the time, so there were definitely instances where people would show the LP to their friends and show genuine confusion if they somehow placed the needle in a different position, playing completely different material.

To add to this, the album had no track listing and was even etched with identical messages. One drawback to this method was that the grooves had to be spaced far enough apart, leaving less room on the second side for material. As a result, there is about half the run-time of the first side. Still, I would have loved to be a fly on the wall to somebody discovering the alternate B side and going slightly senile trying to figure out what happened. I would expect nothing less from Monty Python.





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