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Driving physics

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Mr Tomato
  • Mr Tomato

    Y, RB, RB, Left, RB, LB, RT, LB.

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#1

Posted 12 December 2015 - 10:27 AM Edited by Mr Tomato, 12 December 2015 - 10:28 AM.

not sure if this is the best place to post this, but I'm sure someone lurking in here, could give some valued information.

First of all I do realise this isn't an easy thing to do by any means, but it's something I really want to accomplish one day.

I am wanting to create a physics engine for a driving game, I want to one day fill a void in the market of the genre that I feel needs filling, further more I want to one day get the ideas in my head to come to fruition, I know this isn't something someone can do by them selves.

I have way to much free time, I will probably have about $2000aud or more to spend on a gaming rig, I'm aware that this is an extremely difficult venture to go on, but I want to do whatever it takes.

I'm uncommitted so I could study what I need to, learn what I have to learn and pour time into it.

What I want to know is where can I start, what do I need to do, I'm no programmer.

I don't want to read countless negative comments, I am after concrete information on how someone learns the necessary skill sets and finds like minded people to work with.

If anyone here is frustrated with every single driving game, is into simulators and the like, loves drifting/street racing/cruising and modded cars and the idea of creating a practically new sub genre harnessing those elements wants to bounce ideas and chat about it etc.

Get in contact with me.

Furry_Monkey
  • Furry_Monkey

    I completed Vice City and all I got was this lousy t-shirt

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#2

Posted 21 December 2015 - 05:35 PM Edited by Furry_Monkey, 21 December 2015 - 05:35 PM.

not sure if this is the best place to post this, but I'm sure someone lurking in here, could give some valued information.

First of all I do realise this isn't an easy thing to do by any means, but it's something I really want to accomplish one day.

I am wanting to create a physics engine for a driving game, I want to one day fill a void in the market of the genre that I feel needs filling, further more I want to one day get the ideas in my head to come to fruition, I know this isn't something someone can do by them selves.

I have way to much free time, I will probably have about $2000aud or more to spend on a gaming rig, I'm aware that this is an extremely difficult venture to go on, but I want to do whatever it takes.

I'm uncommitted so I could study what I need to, learn what I have to learn and pour time into it.

What I want to know is where can I start, what do I need to do, I'm no programmer.

I don't want to read countless negative comments, I am after concrete information on how someone learns the necessary skill sets and finds like minded people to work with.

If anyone here is frustrated with every single driving game, is into simulators and the like, loves drifting/street racing/cruising and modded cars and the idea of creating a practically new sub genre harnessing those elements wants to bounce ideas and chat about it etc.

Get in contact with me.

 

Both physics and programming that's complex enough to put the physics into practise?  That's a tall order.  It may sound silly, but start at the beginning and find your own way.  Start learning C++ - you can get Visual Studio free and develop C++ apps in that, using DirectX, and then grab some physics books or find some websites and just start reading.

 

What you're talking about is a vast, vast area of knowledge so it really is difficult for someone to point you in the right direction any more than I'm trying to, without simply telling you how they'd do it.  I'm recommending a very generic starting point where you can find your own way.  You may find you'd rather do something else, once you know what you can and can't do.

 

And one other thing - this *is* something that someone can do by themselves, and don't let anyone tell you otherwise.  It just helps to have other people involved, and obviously is quicker.  If you've got the right head then you don't need any others.


Savidge
  • Savidge

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#3

Posted 12 January 2016 - 08:49 PM

this website may be of use to you.


K^2
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#4

Posted 18 February 2016 - 07:40 AM

Ooof. So let me do my best to discourage you first. I'm a game engine programmer with education in particle physics. Solid background in mechanics is part of the deal. I have written driving simulations almost from scratch. It's hard.

 

Now, if you still feel like giving it a shot, I have some good news. There are a lot of good resources out there. Writing an entire engine completely from scratch is the sort of thing that either takes half a decade or a decent team. Or both. But you don't need to. My recommendation, learn Unity. Don't fall for any "easy" scripting options. You'll have to bite the bullet and learn how to script in C# for Unity. There are tons of tutorials and there are throngs of helpful people in the community. Find a series of articles or YouTube videos that teach you how to make a simple game in Unity and follow along. Once you feel like you understand how to create some objects that you can control and have physical interactions, you're ready to focus on driving.

 

At that point, I strongly recommend this article on vehicle suspension physics on Unity. You can read it right away, and hopefully you'll understand some of it. Come back to it when you understand how to script in Unity and try to implement it. When you're through, you'll be about half way towards being able to make a good, game worthy vehicle simulation. But the best part is that you'll know far more about programming and vehicles by that point, so you'll have a pretty good idea what else you need to learn.

 

Good luck.


Tchuck
  • Tchuck

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#5

Posted 23 February 2016 - 02:17 AM

Alternatively, go with UE4, get the demo project with a vehicle, and see how that works out for you. Based on it, modify/expand/tweak as needed. Since you have zero background in game development, chances are your grand vision can be realized much simpler/faster/quicker by going with an existing template, specially because programming physics can be very hard and not turn out to be good in the end. 

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