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UK Politics & Current Affairs Discussion Thread

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BRITLAND
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#1

Posted 04 January 2015 - 10:27 PM

On the 5th May this year every (if they wish to do so) Brit from every nation of the UK will vote for their political party (or the Prime Minister and his Cabinet) to Govern the UK.
 
Unlike the US, Oz and many other nations in the world the UK Parliament isn't exactly like a two party system. Though it's ultimately going to be between two political parties that hold the keys there are other political parties who have a big influence in politics.
 
The two most popular political parties ie the only that can realistically get a majority of seats in Parliament:
 
The Conservative Party (The Tories)
- Led by David Cameron, current Prime Minister
- Centre Right
- Viewed as UK version of Republicans
 
The Labour Party (Labour)
- Led by Ed Milliband
- Centre Left
- Viewed as UK version of Democrats (though many argue against this)
 
The third party of Britain (Basically the party that usually gets the third highest amount of seats though that could change this May due to their decreased support:
 
The Liberal Democrat Party (The Lib Dems)
- Led by Nick Clegg (current Deputy Prime Minister)
- Centre ideology
- Are seem as the third party of Britain, though their populatiry has significantly decreased, now onl polling 6-8%, lower than UKIP and same levels as the Greens
 
The newish party that has been catching quite a lot of press over the past two years and it is being widely debated on how well they will do in the elections:
 
The UK Independence Party (UKIP)
- Led by Nigel Farage
- Right Wing
- Are third in the polls (though due to First Past The Post voting system its unlikely they will get the same amount of seats votes
- Got the most British seats in the EU Parliament elections beating all other UK political parties including Labour and Conservative
- Currently have two MP in the House of Commons, which were of the result of two by-elections in 2014 after the two MPs had switch parties from Tory to UKIP)
 
Other political parties (small UK wide parties or regional only parties)
 
The Green Party
- Led by Natalie Bennett (in England and Wales)
- Left Wing
- Have 1 seats in House of Commons
- Are split up into three different parties, one for England & Wales, one for Scotland and one for Northern Ireland
- Are unlikely to have a significant impact in the election
 
Scottish National Party (SNP)
- Led by Nicola Sturgeon (though wont be standing as MP as is current First Minister for Scotland at Scottish Parliament replacing Alex Salmond)
- Currently have six MPs, is predicted to significantly increase in Scotland, some predicting they can get 54 of 59 Scottish seats
- Will be led in Westminister by Angus Robertson and Stewart Hosie (the Deputy leader of the SNP)
- Are only standing in Scotland and want further and greater devolution to the Scottish Parliament, basically home rule
- Alex Salmond is running to be an MP
 
Plaid Cymru (Party for Wales)
- Led by Leanne Wood (member of Welsh Assembly)
- Viewed as Welsh version of SNP, wanting Wales to be an independent nation
- Have 3 of 40 Welsh seats in House of Commons
- Unlikely to have a great impact in election as support for Welsh independence is low
 
Northern Ireland Political Parties
In Northern Ireland, politics are different, they don't have the same/vote for the parties we do in Britain, they still have a unionist/republican divide:
 
Democratic Unionist Party (DUP)
- Led by Peter Robinson, current First Minister of Northern Ireland
- Right Wing
- Are generally the most popular political party in Northern Ireland
- 8 out of 19 Northern Irish seats in House of Commons
 
Sinn Fein
- Led by Garry Adams (President as they call him)
- Left Wing
- Support Irish unification (Ireland and Northern Ireland unifying)
- Have 5 seats in the House of Commons, however remain absent from showing up 
 
Social Democratic and Labour Party (SDLP)
- Led by Alasdair McDonnell
- Centre Left
- Have 3 seats in House of Commons
- Are seem as the third party of Northern Ireland similar to how the Lib Dems are to Britain
 
Now similar to the US, we in the UK elect a local MP (Member of Parliament)  via First Past The Post in which who ever gets the most votes in the a constituency will represent the constituency in the House of Commons just like with the House of Representatives. There are 650 seats up for grabs across the UK, approx. one for every 92,000 people in the UK (which reasons why London gets over 70 seats and the entire nation of Scotland gets only 59).
 
The only difference is that we don't technically vote for the Prime Minister, unlike the US where everyone on the electorate register votes for the President. The political party with the majority of seats in the House of Commons (over 325 seats) will automatically become the Government of the UK. If no party achieves that number of seats then the party with the most seats can run the UK under a minority Government or can arrange deals with other parties to have a coalition Government, which happened in 2010 with the Conservatives and the Liberal Democrats
 
The Current Polls
 
Poll from The Observer (Great Britain):
Conservative - 32%
Labour - 33%
Lib Dem - 8%
UKIP - 17%
Green - 4%
Others - 7%
 
Labour set for wipe-out in Scotland
http://www.theguardi...snp-westminster

SNP to take 45 Scottish seats, leaving Labour only 10 of previous 41 and Lib Dems 3 of previous 11, Tories kep their one seats in Scotland

Discuss
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#2

Posted 04 January 2015 - 11:49 PM

A quick glance over of UKIP's economic policy appears to be only vote-grabbing rather than economically sound. They insist on lowering the tax bracket but do not say how they'll compensate for a loss of revenue when this is done. Personally, I don't see this party achieving much and they appear to be another "buzz" party playing on the fear of foreign workers taking jobs. If anyone is a UKIP supporter and would able to divulge more information about this party I would be extremely interested in hearing it.

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#3

Posted 04 January 2015 - 11:53 PM

I see the classical "liberal" parties are also diminishing in other countries in Europe.

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#4

Posted 05 January 2015 - 12:02 AM

I want Ed Balls in office. That's all I have to contribute.


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#5

Posted 05 January 2015 - 01:03 AM Edited by Palikari, 05 January 2015 - 02:37 AM.

I don't like Ed Milliband as he's a self-hating Jew and I can't stand the progressive policies of the Labour Party.

 

UKIP is too populist and I don't agree with them on several important issues.

 

I don't like the Lib-Dems. I don't agree with them on almost anything.

 

If I were British I think I would vote for the Conservatives. They are the least worse option, altough I don't like them anyway.


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#6

Posted 05 January 2015 - 01:38 AM

At first glance UKIP seems to be the british version of the horrid Progress Party we unfortunately have to deal with here in Norway.

 

I don't Ed Milliband as he's a self-hating Jew 

 

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#7

Posted 05 January 2015 - 02:04 AM

I missed out on being able to vote in the 2010 election, voting was held the day before my 18th birthday so I wasn't eligible. Gutted & wrekt.

 

I intend to vote come may, and I'll be voting for UKIP. They've got a lot of questionable policies, but I'm willing to overlook that because they're the only party that are serious about tackling immigration.

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#8

Posted 05 January 2015 - 02:06 AM

Why is the Labour parties status as the Demsocrats of the UK disputed by some? As you said in your post

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#9

Posted 05 January 2015 - 02:17 AM

Why is the Labour parties status as the Demsocrats of the UK disputed by some? As you said in your post

The Democrats seem to be closer to the conservatives, Labour have many policy proposals while not being that left-wing would probably not go down well in the states.

 

I'll probably be voting for the Lib Dems as they seem the most supportive of the Eu and voting reform and other constitutional reforms. 

 

The Greens have some good ideas but their foreign policy is awful. And I may just be me but some members of the Green party are some of the most annoying people on earth.

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#10

Posted 05 January 2015 - 02:27 AM

Just looked at the official facebook page and status of David Cameron regarding Employment and wages being up. Sadly doesnt look like the majority agree with him from the comments.

 

https://www.facebook...898807896810196


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#11

Posted 05 January 2015 - 09:15 AM

People are stupid, though.

It's pretty hard to dispute the figures. The UK is the fastest growing economy in the G7 and has the fastest stable growth in the EU. Wages are growing faster than inflation and employment higher than pre-crisis levels. I'm not convinced that the Conservative-led policies have been the best possible for returning economic prosperity but there's little dispute that they have done so. That's going to be the biggest issue for the other parties to try and address; Labour's continued insistence that the Conservatives can't be trusted with the economy looks pretty hollow now we're outgrowing most of our competitors.

How will I vote? I don't know. UKIP are filled with populist bluster and blanket statements about immigration that have no bearing in reality so on the basis of fundamental dishonesty they can be kicked to the kerb pretty quickly.

Labour seem stuck in a rut and Ed Milliband has all the charisma of a rotting whale carcass; it was on the back of a union movement that's far too politicised he came to power in the first place which is a huge put-off for me. The last thing I'm going want to to listen to is the political views of some hypocritical dinosaurs who decry wealth whilst bringing home six-figure paychecks earned on the backs of blackmailing working people into political support by denying them assistance in arbitration with their employers unless they tow the line. Plus he seems pretty dedicated to screwing Middle England and their policies towards investment in high-tech growth sectors are laughable, and I'm not likely to vote for a party that have no interest in investing in the sector I work in, so that's basically out too.

The small and nationalist parties are generally silly and a complete waste of a vote.

The Lib Dems are probably about right on social policies but wrong just about everywhere else. That said they've been really good locally; I live in a Lib Dem safe seat and they've been much better than the other parties at addressing local concerns.

I voted Conservative last election but I'm concerned about growing Euroscepticism and some really f*cking questionable social policies, plus I'm really not convinced that their plans to further roll back the state are sound. And if we leave the EU, I'm leaving this damn country. So yeah, basically there's no party currently with a policy direction that actually suits my views enough to commit to voting for them.
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#12

Posted 05 January 2015 - 12:49 PM

i'll be voting for SNP. no chance of conservatives/democrats or labour. 


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#13

Posted 05 January 2015 - 06:13 PM Edited by BRITLAND, 05 January 2015 - 06:55 PM.

Why is the Labour parties status as the Demsocrats of the UK disputed by some? As you said in your post

Conservatives are further to the right than Labour, just as Republican is further to the right than the Democrats, Democrats may be on par with the Tories technically but they are the two most popular political parties so people just see it as that

though ever since Tony Blair people pretty much view Labour as Conservative-Lite meaning that maybe Labour are now like the Democrats, but my knowledge of US politics isn't the best so don't rely on me for answers :)

People are stupid, though.

It's pretty hard to dispute the figures. The UK is the fastest growing economy in the G7 and has the fastest stable growth in the EU. Wages are growing faster than inflation and employment higher than pre-crisis levels. I'm not convinced that the Conservative-led policies have been the best possible for returning economic prosperity but there's little dispute that they have done so. That's going to be the biggest issue for the other parties to try and address; Labour's continued insistence that the Conservatives can't be trusted with the economy looks pretty hollow now we're outgrowing most of our competitors.

How will I vote? I don't know. UKIP are filled with populist bluster and blanket statements about immigration that have no bearing in reality so on the basis of fundamental dishonesty they can be kicked to the kerb pretty quickly.

Labour seem stuck in a rut and Ed Milliband has all the charisma of a rotting whale carcass; it was on the back of a union movement that's far too politicised he came to power in the first place which is a huge put-off for me. The last thing I'm going want to to listen to is the political views of some hypocritical dinosaurs who decry wealth whilst bringing home six-figure paychecks earned on the backs of blackmailing working people into political support by denying them assistance in arbitration with their employers unless they tow the line. Plus he seems pretty dedicated to screwing Middle England and their policies towards investment in high-tech growth sectors are laughable, and I'm not likely to vote for a party that have no interest in investing in the sector I work in, so that's basically out too.

The small and nationalist parties are generally silly and a complete waste of a vote.

The Lib Dems are probably about right on social policies but wrong just about everywhere else. That said they've been really good locally; I live in a Lib Dem safe seat and they've been much better than the other parties at addressing local concerns.

I voted Conservative last election but I'm concerned about growing Euroscepticism and some really f*cking questionable social policies, plus I'm really not convinced that their plans to further roll back the state are sound. And if we leave the EU, I'm leaving this damn country. So yeah, basically there's no party currently with a policy direction that actually suits my views enough to commit to voting for them.


EDIT: I forgot to reply to you for a second xD

I agree with what you said about Labour, they will certainly won't get my vote in May, not only that I don't like Miliband, don't like Harman, don't like Balls, don't like Cooper, though I do like Chucka Umnuba or however you spell his surname but he ruled himself out for leadership I believe but he's only young I guess. Labour just seem to bring carnage to Britain these days.

UKIP could care less about, I think they will be lucky to get any more than 10 seats, but the EU stuff isn't in my deep interests as of now.

Not sure about Wales but I'm considering SNP, they seem to be the only party that cares for Scotland, whereas Labour just take us for granted. Under FPTP and by current trends in Scotland it look like the SNP & Labour are taking the seats with the SNP taking the majority, a poll in May suggested that the SNP could take 54 seats! (Though I couldn't see that happening)
I live in Jim Murphy's constituency but he's likely to leave Westminister soon so perhaps if a by-election occurs the Tories might take back what was once they're safest seat, but for now it look like the SNP are the only party who could take East Ren if lucky, I certainly don't want Murphy representing me again so SNP may get my vote

Lib Dem, I would support them, but not until Nick Clegg is gone. I have a feeling he'll drag the party into another coalition with either Labour or Conservative, which could pretty much kill the party, the sooner he goes, the better.

The Tories are another top pick from me, I know the party isn't the most popular in Scotland but they aren't as hated as you would think, well not in my area (East Renfrewshire) and I'm not too fussed about anti EU. In regards to the PM, between Cameron or Miliband, Id certainly vote Cameron anyday of the week

I think at this stage I'm either voting Tory or SNP, two completely different type of parties but I'm fine with the idea of the SNP controlling Scotland while the Tories control Government, as long as Labour don't have a majority

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#14

Posted 05 January 2015 - 06:21 PM Edited by Stephan90, 05 January 2015 - 06:29 PM.

Politics is very easy for the ones who draw a line from the left to the right and place every party somewhere on the line. You can decide if one party is more to the left or right than another party. You can also put in distances.

 

----------A-------------B--------------C--------------

 

According to this model party A should never cooperate with party C. It is impossible for party A to agree on something that party C on a certain matter and vice versa.

 

This isn't how politics should work but sadly in reality it often works like that. It is understandable when parties form coalitions with other parties they share the most common standpoints but when it comes to passing the majority of laws every party should stick to its own values and make decisions based on facts rather than depending on what the other parties say and speak out against the other parties out of principle.


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#15

Posted 05 January 2015 - 06:34 PM

I would be very cautious, with anything, the EU is promising to be good in nature. Any party that spouts, they have the fix, for ALL of it, even part of it, the mess I'm talking about..... then they are speaking as directed, from higher up, and it's bull. I've watched this country go that very same route, time and time again, every so many years between parties. It will have huge costs, and flop before it flies, I can almost promise it.

 

At bear minimum, if they pick the E.U., to be one of the very few areas left in the world to be "economically sound"? they are doing like they always did, setting up a bail out plan, for the rest of their failed moves on the planet...... Tell me I was wrong in five years.  :bbq:


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#16

Posted 05 January 2015 - 07:14 PM

Politics is very easy for the ones who draw a line from the left to the right and place every party somewhere on the line. You can decide if one party is more to the left or right than another party. You can also put in distances.

 

----------A-------------B--------------C--------------

 

According to this model party A should never cooperate with party C. It is impossible for party A to agree on something that party C on a certain matter and vice versa.

 

This isn't how politics should work but sadly in reality it often works like that. It is understandable when parties form coalitions with other parties they share the most common standpoints but when it comes to passing the majority of laws every party should stick to its own values and make decisions based on facts rather than depending on what the other parties say and speak out against the other parties out of principle.

Is this why you subscribe to the Third Position?

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#17

Posted 05 January 2015 - 07:20 PM

 

Politics is very easy for the ones who draw a line from the left to the right and place every party somewhere on the line. You can decide if one party is more to the left or right than another party. You can also put in distances.

 

----------A-------------B--------------C--------------

 

According to this model party A should never cooperate with party C. It is impossible for party A to agree on something that party C on a certain matter and vice versa.

 

This isn't how politics should work but sadly in reality it often works like that. It is understandable when parties form coalitions with other parties they share the most common standpoints but when it comes to passing the majority of laws every party should stick to its own values and make decisions based on facts rather than depending on what the other parties say and speak out against the other parties out of principle.

Is this why you subscribe to the Third Position?

 

 

only in the imagination of your limited mind

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#18

Posted 05 January 2015 - 09:12 PM

Quick correction:  The US president isn't elected by popular majority, but through the electoral college.  You can win the popular vote, but loose the electoral college RE: Bush v Gore 2000.  

 

Anyways, as a knuckle-dragging American rube I can't really comment other than to say that I hope everything goes well.  It'll be interesting how this UKIP party does tho.  

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Posted 05 January 2015 - 10:18 PM

Quick correction:  The US president isn't elected by popular majority, but through the electoral college.  You can win the popular vote, but loose the electoral college RE: Bush v Gore 2000.  
 
Anyways, as a knuckle-dragging American rube I can't really comment other than to say that I hope everything goes well.  It'll be interesting how this UKIP party does tho.  


That's f*cked up that y'all yankies have Congress decide your President in the end, I thought America was meant to be democracy capital of the world.

Anyway I'm looking forward to seeing how UKIP do, PM questions with Nigel Farage along with Boris Johnson and Alex Salmond will be entertaining. Nigel appearing in the ITV leaders debate with the other three will also be brilliant car crash TV :D Shame the BBC & Channel 4/Sky News don't won't do that idea, I know these debates are meant to be serious, but it's not like you learn anything, just brilliant car crash trash TV :D

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#20

Posted 06 January 2015 - 04:03 AM Edited by Irviding, 06 January 2015 - 04:03 AM.


That's f*cked up that y'all yankies have Congress decide your President in the end, I thought America was meant to be democracy capital of the world.

 

No we don't.... Congress only decides the Presidency if there is a tie in the electoral college, it happened that way in 1800 and in 1824 elections. The electoral college is a lot different than that. Basically each state's popular vote turns into votes from the states electoral college. So if Ohio votes 51% democratic, the electors will all vote for the Democratic candidate, etc. That's what battleground states are. It's pretty interesting if you want to read up on it. The idea that it's undemocratic is pretty wrong though, it is quite democratic. The issue is that it really leaves a good amount of AMerican voters ignored by the candidates if they aren't in battleground states. Nobody campaigns in New York or Texas, for example because NY is solid democrat and Texas is solid republican. 

 

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#21

Posted 06 January 2015 - 01:04 PM

OK, my opinion....

The election this year features the most unusual collection of leaders in a while and they can be broken down as follows.

Tories : Cameron, the Bully. He uses his hands to express his statements and walks off from interviews as soon as his statements are done. He really hates having his opinions and policies questioned. Is he good PM material? Probably the best of a bad bunch, but I would wonder about how he would cope if the Tories won an outright majority.

Labour : Milliband, Mr Bean and the most uncomfortable man in politics. There are very few pictures of 'Red Ed' that flatter him, they all make him look like a loon! His overbite and teeth seem to be picked up constantly and it only adds to the Mr Bean effect. He flusters about policies and seems to toe the party line about 'the cost of living crisis' too much. Is he good PM material? Nope, he just looks too uncomfortable and unable to cope. His best chance is UKIP splitting the Tory vote, but I believe most people are too smart to fall for UKIP's plan.

Liberal Democrats : Clegg, the Lapdog. He is a confident politician and a half decent Deputy PM. But, he has cost his party too much under the Coalition Government by basically capitulating to every Tory demand. His party has had a few victories in policy, but the Tories have taken all the credit leaving him with nothing.... Is he good PM material? I would say, yes as he does have an open and fair attitude to policy and is willing to question even his own party stance. But the damage has been done by the Coalition over the last 5 year term, I have a suspicion he will be lucky to keep his own Sheffield seat, let alone challenge for PM.

UKIP : Farage, the Racist! Seriously, if you like the sound of jackboots on your pavement and your kids attending the 'Farage Youth', then vote UKIP! His policies are totally biased around the EU and immigration and not one of the other members of the party say anything, for fear of launching yet another gaffe. The party has basically been racist to every minority group in the UK, yet still the skinheads vote for them. Is he good PM material? Are you kidding? He will end up drawing the UK into a massive recession if he gets anywhere near power as he will force us to leave the EU. The result is the only country that will talk to us will be the US. So UKIP will change us into the 51st state by default. Heil Farage!

So there you have it, take your pick everyone. We have 5 months to go and boy is it gonna be tough to choose....

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#22

Posted 06 January 2015 - 01:16 PM

Clegg is honestly the nicest and has the best ideology out of the three leaders. He seems to get so much hate, they all do to be fair, and I think it's hard not to feel a little bit of sympathy for him, despite his mistakes.


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#23

Posted 06 January 2015 - 01:38 PM Edited by Captain VXR, 06 January 2015 - 01:38 PM.

Clegg is honestly the nicest and has the best ideology out of the three leaders. He seems to get so much hate, they all do to be fair, and I think it's hard not to feel a little bit of sympathy for him, despite his mistakes.

His going back on virtually every policy he promised before the 2010 general election have anything to do with the hate for him? He's only leading to Labour in his seat by 3 points, it would make my day if he lost it.

 

I'll be voting Labour in Portsmouth South as the Greens don't have much of a chance here, and there is no chance of me voting for the Lib Dems, Tories or UKIP. Mike HandyCock and Penny Mordaunt have shown how useless the local Lib Dems and Tories are, whilst UKIP stand for pretty much everything I do not.  I'd much rather have Chuka Umunna over Miliband, however I've had enough of the Tories f*cking over my generation. 


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#24

Posted 06 January 2015 - 01:45 PM

 

Clegg is honestly the nicest and has the best ideology out of the three leaders. He seems to get so much hate, they all do to be fair, and I think it's hard not to feel a little bit of sympathy for him, despite his mistakes.

His going back on virtually every policy he promised before the 2010 general election have anything to do with the hate for him? He's only leading to Labour in his seat by 3 points, it would make my day if he lost it.

 

I'll be voting Labour in Portsmouth South as the Greens don't have much of a chance here, and there is no chance of me voting for the Lib Dems, Tories or UKIP. Mike HandyCock and Penny Mordaunt have shown how useless the local Lib Dems and Tories are, whilst UKIP stand for pretty much everything I do not.  I'd much rather have Chuka Umunna over Miliband, however I've had enough of the Tories f*cking over my generation. 

 

Clegg just seems the most genuine. It's hardly virtually every policy, I recall seeing document that showed how many pledges that the Lib Dems have kept, they were not big issues so they went under the radar I'll try look for it now.

 

Is promise really good word to use? If I promise to do something for you, and then circumstances change or powers beyond my control come into play have I done something horrible by not fulfilling that promise? Give them some slack they can't do everything and fulfill every promise.


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#25

Posted 06 January 2015 - 01:50 PM

Clegg's main policy or at least one of his main policies for 2010 was free university tuition fees. Then his party gets into government and university fees end up tripling. That's probably by far the biggest reason behind the LD's massive drop in support. He is a shining example of modern politics, whereby politicians have very little, if any, integrity and they'll spin as many lies as they can and sell out themselves and their supporters for a sniff of power. It's hard to gain voter trust when you do such a ridiculously massive u-turn over one of your main policies.

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#26

Posted 06 January 2015 - 01:56 PM

Clegg's main policy or at least one of his main policies for 2010 was free university tuition fees. Then his party gets into government and university fees end up tripling. That's probably by far the biggest reason behind the LD's massive drop in support. He is a shining example of modern politics, whereby politicians have very little, if any, integrity and they'll spin as many lies as they can and sell out themselves and their supporters for a sniff of power. It's hard to gain voter trust when you do such a ridiculously massive u-turn over one of your main policies.

And I cannot wait for our lord savor Farage to come in and rescue politics.

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#27

Posted 06 January 2015 - 02:18 PM

His going back on virtually every policy he promised before the 2010 general election have anything to do with the hate for him?


I think ultimate responsibility for that lies with the Lib Dem policymakers and their propensity for dreaming up policies based on catchy soundbytes rather than rationality, in the belief that they'd never be in a position to enact them anyway.
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#28

Posted 06 January 2015 - 03:13 PM

 

His going back on virtually every policy he promised before the 2010 general election have anything to do with the hate for him?


I think ultimate responsibility for that lies with the Lib Dem policymakers and their propensity for dreaming up policies based on catchy soundbytes rather than rationality, in the belief that they'd never be in a position to enact them anyway.

 

Don't promise what you cannot offer, furthermore, catchy soundbites are something that really annoy me as anything populist does. I wish we had a strong and decent liberal party like Canada's Liberals rather than the spineless hypocrites here. I'm interested to see how well the Greens perform at this election. They're the only party that want to end the ridiculous prohibition of cannabis as one example, something the Tories and Labour have their heads up their respective asses about.


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#29

Posted 06 January 2015 - 03:21 PM

call me a moron but I'm voting UKIP or Tories

only just turning 18 as well, I'll be allowed to vote it's what I've been looking forward to :D

I think the most important thing is for the country to be out of the Union coz it's doing nobody a favour
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#30

Posted 06 January 2015 - 03:35 PM

call me a moron but I'm voting UKIP or Tories

only just turning 18 as well, I'll be allowed to vote it's what I've been looking forward to :D

I think the most important thing is for the country to be out of the Union coz it's doing nobody a favour

No ones going to call you an idiot. If you explained why you hold the views that you do I'm sure some of us would offer constructive advice to help you improve your opinion ;) 





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