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Should Christianity be taught in school as a part of American History?

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Poll: Should Christianity be taught in school as a part of American History? (125 member(s) have cast votes)

Is Christianity a necessary thing in relation to American history and is it necessary enough to be taught in school as a part of the class?

  1. Yes (69 votes [55.20%])

    Percentage of vote: 55.20%

  2. No (56 votes [44.80%])

    Percentage of vote: 44.80%

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Xl anthrax lX
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#1

Posted 18 November 2014 - 04:41 AM Edited by Xl anthrax lX, 18 November 2014 - 04:42 AM.

I believe that one can not truly understand American history if you don't understand the role that Christianity played whether you are religious or not. I am personally an Atheist but I don't deny the importance that the religion held in the bringing up of America.


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#2

Posted 18 November 2014 - 04:54 AM Edited by mr toasterbutt, 18 November 2014 - 05:12 AM.

I'm an athiest. Fully agree don't see any problem with it and have no other opinion.

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eroch
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#3

Posted 18 November 2014 - 07:54 PM

Religion in general is taught as part of history courses in most schools I believe. I don't know about the depth of it though. I'm pretty sure they cover the big 3 monotheistic religions though.


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#4

Posted 18 November 2014 - 08:53 PM

I don't really understand this question.

 

you mean Christian doctrine??

or just teaching kids that "hey there's thing called Christianity and a lot of our forefathers believed in it."

 

because I'm pretty sure they already get the gist of it.

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Xl anthrax lX
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#5

Posted 18 November 2014 - 10:58 PM

I don't really understand this question.

 

you mean Christian doctrine??

or just teaching kids that "hey there's thing called Christianity and a lot of our forefathers believed in it."

 

because I'm pretty sure they already get the gist of it.

 

Well in order to fully explain the bringing up of America you must understand the role that religion played, has played and is still playing today. Christianity in particular has had big influences on American history. It's like trying to understand the history of India without going into how Islam has played a part in it's history.


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#6

Posted 19 November 2014 - 03:06 PM

What El_D's saying is there's a big difference between teaching Christianity and its tenets in schools, and teaching about people who were Christian and following their beliefs to form society. Your initial post was unclear. That said, I think it's relatively unnecessary to expand on Christianity as a driving force of America's development as that's been sort of the status quo with American history teaching regarding the colonization period of America (ie religious freedom of Puritans settling in their New England, the birth of the Rhode Island colony as further religious freedom within the colonies, etc), as well as the fact that most of the western world at the time of America's birth was at least some form of theist, so it'll be fairly obvious what role Christianity or faith and religion played in the early development of America.

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#7

Posted 20 November 2014 - 12:15 AM

There should be an importance placed on the historical role of the religion as a driving force, though. Of course it still remains a relevant facet of American society, but abnegating its importance in context to the values with which it left the puritans in New England, to the ways in which it was used to convert natives and sort-of forcibly assimilating them into early American society, would leave out a huge chunk of the ideas and virtues used to justify the actions of the people living then. 

 

Although, now that I think about it, I don't think religion should be taught in tandem to a specific nation's history, because the effect overall is worldwide and mostly something that transcends political boundary-- there are exceptions to that of course, but they are fewer than the former.

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#8

Posted 23 November 2014 - 12:16 AM

Of course it needs to be taught about, assuming you mean that in a completely objective way.

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#9

Posted 23 November 2014 - 06:19 AM Edited by Happpy11, 23 November 2014 - 06:22 AM.

I learned about all 3 Abrahamic religions in world history(10th grade year). I'm currently in American history right now(11th grade year). I don't see why I'd have to learn about Christianity a second time but that's just the it's set up at my school, geography, world history, and american history are mandatory courses at the school that I attend.

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#10

Posted 24 November 2014 - 09:11 AM

I think so, yes. Christianity is extremely relevant to Western civilization... you really can't understand the history of the west without knowing some basics of Christianity and how it has affected development of modern countries and such. That said, Islam is also quite relevant when studying the ME and Asia, Hinduism/Buddhism to India, and historic Asian religions/belief systems like Confucianism, legalism, and Shinto for modern Japan. Everyone really should know the basics of all religions. You can teach that without "indoctrinating" children.
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#11

Posted 26 November 2014 - 02:11 PM

Unless you're talking about the American role in the Crusades, the teaching of religion isn't necessary. Highlighting the divisions of early America is one thing, but the actual teachings of Christianity bear nothing for history.
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#12

Posted 26 November 2014 - 02:19 PM

If they teach in a historical way and they mention that their religion killed millions of people at the inquisition age, them I'm fine with it.

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#13

Posted 27 November 2014 - 04:49 AM

If they teach in a historical way and they mention that their religion killed millions of people at the inquisition age, them I'm fine with it.

 

That seems irrelevant when you're talking about the role Christianity played in the founding of the United States of America and has played since then. If you were to learn about Christianity as a whole, its tenets, and its history, then sure, that would be relevant. 

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#14

Posted 27 November 2014 - 01:23 PM

You do not shove religion down a child's throat.
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#15

Posted 27 November 2014 - 07:38 PM

You do not shove religion down a child's throat.

You do, however, teach about its historical relevance and impact. 

 

Also, the shoving down throat ship has gone; there's a whole christian doctrine going on in the U.S.

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#16

Posted 07 December 2014 - 05:37 PM Edited by Winning001, 07 December 2014 - 05:39 PM.

Teaching it as a way for students to have a better understanding of certain events that heavily involve (or involved) religion: I dont see why not

 

Knowing about different religions really makes learning (especially History) a better experience since religion was much more present than it its today

 

Also a lot of older texts relate events that happen in the story to religious events of the Bible/other religious texts, so the reader can get a better understanding of what is going on in the story

 

on the otherhand, Shoving any religion down the student's throats as a form of brainwashing them into believing nonsense: no go


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#17

Posted 07 December 2014 - 09:25 PM

there's lots of things that are part of human history that we don't emphasize in school.

because a lot of those things we can get along just fine without; you know most of our Founding Fathers were members of the Freemason Society so maybe kids should learn about Freemasonry?

 

I don't see what valuble context or wisdom it would provide.

Christianity is the same thing.

 

we don't need to teach it in school.


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#18

Posted 08 December 2014 - 07:43 PM Edited by Irviding, 09 December 2014 - 05:09 PM.

there's lots of things that are part of human history that we don't emphasize in school.
because a lot of those things we can get along just fine without; you know most of our Founding Fathers were members of the Freemason Society so maybe kids should learn about Freemasonry?
 
I don't see what valuble context or wisdom it would provide.
Christianity is the same thing.
 
we don't need to teach it in school.

I think that's very close minded and short sighted.

Both of them don't have the same wide ranging impacts. Christianity is to the development of the West what Islam is to the Middle East/North Africa what the various Asian religions are to Asia, etc. Do you need to teach kids a detailed history about Jesus, the Virgin Mary, and the 12 apostles? No. It is however relevant to teach them that it's a monotheistic religion, its basic tenants and goals, which are extremely important when learning about the reformation, colonialism and even imperialism, and how that relates to western culture. the same goes for the basics of Islam and other religions. I don't get why everyone is piling on Christianity. If you ask a lot of these far left people if some basics of Christianity in the context of world history should be taught they'll jump down your throat, but Islam, Shintoism, Hinduism, Buddhism, not a problem. They all should be taught in that context to create a well rounded and educated student. I appreciate being taught about all of those religions as a student.

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#19

Posted 08 December 2014 - 07:51 PM

sure whatever.

 

whether it's a zombie Jew born 2,000 years ago or a 4-armed blue skin monster, in the long run I don't see their value.

they're just stories from ancient tradition. you can mine a little bit of rudimentary philosophy and existentialism from them, but you can also mine these same values from a myriad of other sources without all the horrific mixed messages of hatred, bigotry, and intolerance that are found within most religious texts.


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#20

Posted 08 December 2014 - 08:06 PM

You cannot possibly be denying the fact that Christianity has made an impact on history? 


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#21

Posted 08 December 2014 - 10:29 PM

it's had an impact on history.

it doesn't need to have any impact on the future.

 

I don't see the logical benefit to "teaching" Christianity outside of being aware of it in a general sense.

illustrate for me the benefit of teaching Christianity in public schools. please.


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#22

Posted 09 December 2014 - 09:03 AM

I don't think he's proposing the teaching of Christianity in anything more than a contextual sense. Like the rudimentary contextual understanding of Islam you'd need to study Moorish history for instance.
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#23

Posted 09 December 2014 - 06:47 PM

right.

and if that's the case then this entire debate is moot and my very first post was basically /thread

 

there's nothing to debate here.

kids already grow up knowing about Christianity and its place in history. how could they not? it's f/cking everywhere.


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#24

Posted 09 December 2014 - 07:10 PM

there's lots of things that are part of human history that we don't emphasize in school.

because a lot of those things we can get along just fine without; you know most of our Founding Fathers were members of the Freemason Society so maybe kids should learn about Freemasonry?

 

I don't see what valuble context or wisdom it would provide.

Christianity is the same thing.

 

we don't need to teach it in school.

 

Christianity should be mentioned, even if only briefly, when talking about American history. The Mayflower Compact was full of references to God, and the Pilgrims sought land because of their faith. More advanced classes could probably drag in the impacts Protestantism has had on American development. 


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#25

Posted 09 December 2014 - 07:23 PM Edited by El Diablo, 09 December 2014 - 07:24 PM.

can't argue with that.

 

but I feel like we're already doing a good job of that.

...so like I said from the very beginning, I cannot figure out the point of this thread.

 

this doesn't feel debate-worthy at all.

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#26

Posted 16 January 2015 - 03:58 PM

I'm also an atheist. I don't see it as a problem but it shouldn't be taught in a lecture manner. Over here, some schools are taught religion and sometimes when the pupils have opinions they are regarded as wrong. I think the teaching of Christianity should be short, not overpowered


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#27

Posted 25 January 2015 - 04:36 AM

this makes me sad this generation is messed up because back in the 1800s and back most people in america were christians. and when they first started doing school the only textbooks were the encyclopedia and the bible. there was none of this stupid chemistry or science. they shoved that crap down my throat and i barely passed. they should definatly have christianity in schools maybe not in history but its own class. but thats not gonna happen cause the school board are all athiests. when i wrote a report in school one time and i mentioned god and religion i was given an f automatically. and also when i was feeling suicidel and wanted to be with god one time i went to my counsler to talk but when i mentioned religion they made me leave. then i was bullied because of my beliefs. i nearly killed myself school is hell no kid deserves to go through it the only thing that kept me sane was coming home to play gta with my friends.


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#28

Posted 25 January 2015 - 09:57 AM

So on the back of your bad personal experiences, you resent the notion of truth and factual accuracy being taught over dogma and denialism?
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#29

Posted 25 January 2015 - 01:48 PM

this makes me sad this generation is messed up because back in the 1800s and back most people in america were christians. and when they first started doing school the only textbooks were the encyclopedia and the bible. there was none of this stupid chemistry or science. they shoved that crap down my throat and i barely passed.

If you hate science and chemistry then be principled about it and destroy your computer and only travel by horse (like people did in the 1800's). If you get sick, refuse modern medicine and die with pride. Remove all technology and innovation from past 1899 from your life. As long as you won't make this effort you'll be a hypocrite when saying you hate science or chemistry. Apart from that, your notion that no science or chemistry existed in the 1800's is factually inaccurate. It sucks that you had such a bad experience in school, but it hasn't got much to do with science or chemistry.

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#30

Posted 25 January 2015 - 03:41 PM

Pretty sure they had science and math 200 years ago and also pretty sure the teachers taught you more than "the bible and the encyclopedia"......
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