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Russian gang stole 1.2 billion Net passwords

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AiraCobra
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#1

Posted 06 August 2014 - 10:57 PM Edited by AiraCobra, 07 August 2014 - 12:38 AM.

:panic: Russian gang stole 1.2 billion Net passwords :panic: 

 

Security researchers say a Russian crime ring has pulled off the largest known theft of confidential Internet information, including 1.2 billion username and password combinations and more than 500 million email addresses.

 

The cyber gang injected malicious code to steal databases from at least 420,000 websites, says Alex Holden, founder and chief information security officer for Hold Security in Milwaukee, Wisc.

"It is absolutely the largest breach we've ever encountered," Holden said late Tuesday.

 

Most unsettling, he said, was finding his own credentials among the compromised data.

 

Hold Security cyber sleuths have been monitoring the cyber gang for about seven months, but only recently realized the magnitude of the gang's operation, Holden said.

 

"We thought at first they were run-of-the-mill spammers," he said. "But they got very good at stealing these databases."

 

Holden won't identify the gang, but he says his investigators know their names and locations. "The perpetrators are in Russia so not much can be done. These people are outside the law," he said.

 

Hold Security said it is trying to contact the victims, but most of the websites remain vulnerable. Holden would not identify the victims, but said they included the auto industry, real estate, oil companies, consulting firms, car rental businesses, hotels, computer hardware and software firms and the food industry. The gang targeted SQL databases, Holden said.

 

The New York Times first reported the breach Tuesday.

 

Word comes as hundreds of the world's computer security professionals gather here for Black Hat, a major computer-security conference.

 

While the breach appears to be large, it's still hard to say if it's the biggest that's ever been discovered, said Marc Maiffret, the chief technical officer at BeyondTrust, a Phoenix-based computer security company. "There's always lots of changes when the dust settles, it takes months to know" how important a breach was, he said.

 

If a cache of passwords this big has been found, others likely exist. "I would absolutely assume there are others," said Maiffret.

 

The cache of credentials was created by taking advantage of the two most common types of hacking — attacking web sites to gain access to underlying databases of customer information, as well as going after individuals and "everyday email," said Maiffret. "It's really a perfect storm" of an attack, he said.

 

The size of the operation shouldn't come as a surprise to anyone, Maiffret said. "In the past, when people thought of hacking, they thought of a lone teen-aged hacker sitting in the basement," he said. "But people need to realize that most hacking today is related to organized crime."

Even large companies need to acknowledge that modern-day hackers are likely "much better funded than they are," said security expert Sharon Vardi, who is the chief marketing officer of Securonix. "They are backed by millions of dollars to get the job done," he said.

Describing the breach as "easily five times the size of the Target breach," Vardi said that most organizations are not set up to defend these types of attacks. "They are not monitoring anomalies in their networks to detect these breaches quickly," he said.

 

Security expert Phil Lieberman, CEO of Lieberman Software, thinks the theft may be more of a warning or a veiled threat from the Russians. "I think this is a political statement rather than a security threat," he said. "I think there is a message being sent and the message is: Watch out."

The Russian government could have prevented the breach, he says. "But then the question is: Why should they? Are we such good friends that they should stop this?"

 

USAToday

 

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What are your views on this?

 

To me this signifies a hugh lapse of security on the part of the United States Goverment, Maybe if they would spend less time spying on their own people they might've caught this sooner but instead it was a small security firm in the middle of the country that actually caught this now the government.

 

Have you ever been the victim of a hacker?

 

This is kind of scary, This kind of scares me even more than the Target hacker theft of credit card information last year and my information was stolen I've been lucky so far that my info wasn't/hasn't been used by whoever stolen/bought the info

 

Do you change your password often?

 

ever since then i have been extra careful and i change my password to all my accounts that holds any personal or financial info  every week.

 

Prior to that i only changed my password whenever i got a reminder that i should change it

 

 

__________________________

 

It would be wise to change your password to your e-mail and any accounts which have private infomation such as Personal Infomation such as Name, Address, Phone Number ect and websites such as your Bank & Credit Card Companies since they are tied to your e-mail it would be easy to gain access to your credit card accounts and bank accounts.

 

Although they said that none of the information taken has been used or believe to have not yet been sold it would be wise to change them just as a percaution

  • Bi0ha2ard_q8 likes this

Winning001
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#2

Posted 06 August 2014 - 10:58 PM

I heard about this. Well....time to change my password from 123457 to 123458 oooh

On a serious note, wow.


universetwisters
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#3

Posted 06 August 2014 - 11:07 PM

I saw this on the news shortly before I went to work, lordy damn. Just how easy is it for them to steal passwords en masse?


FRAIZER
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#4

Posted 06 August 2014 - 11:11 PM Edited by FRA1Z3R, 06 August 2014 - 11:26 PM.

There's already a topic on this.

Never mind then. :D
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Winning001
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#5

Posted 06 August 2014 - 11:11 PM

I saw this on the news shortly before I went to work, lordy damn. Just how easy is it for them to steal passwords en masse?

probably varies on the sight. Some places may have a file with usernames and passwords in plain text,  some may be much more complicated


Vlynor
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#6

Posted 06 August 2014 - 11:13 PM

There's already a topic on this.

http://gtaforums.com...security-flaws/

 

That's such an in-depth OP.


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#7

Posted 06 August 2014 - 11:17 PM Edited by Voodoo, 06 August 2014 - 11:20 PM.

http://gtaforums.com...security-flaws/

 

E - Actually, Vlynor is right. This OP is much better. Let's use this thread instead.


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#8

Posted 06 August 2014 - 11:49 PM

Is nothing sacred? 

 

I'm running out of passwords to change to. Not going to change them yet. 


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#9

Posted 07 August 2014 - 12:33 AM

Meh. Even if they stumble upon my passwords by any chance, it's not gonna do them any good. That's how irrelevant I am.

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AiraCobra
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#10

Posted 07 August 2014 - 12:37 AM

http://gtaforums.com...security-flaws/

 

E - Actually, Vlynor is right. This OP is much better. Let's use this thread instead.

:^:

 

Yeah i saw that thread, But i figured i'd be safe remaking it.


Winning001
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#11

Posted 07 August 2014 - 12:40 AM

If I start posting nonsense in Russian, then you know what happened :)
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SolidSnails
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#12

Posted 07 August 2014 - 12:50 AM

Thought this was a well planned milestone but gawd damn russians be cray cray this time of year!

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#13

Posted 07 August 2014 - 12:54 AM

I hope that Russian gang enjoys my PornHub account.

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walkingsickness
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#14

Posted 07 August 2014 - 12:57 AM

This is not surprising nor isn't going to stop anytime soon. 

 

The current infrastructure to prevent this in the first place is archaic. Even when you updated or even create new code its a programmer

that is programming it. Hacker are programmers. There is always a backdoor to the program.

 

The messed up thing is that they can do this at any time. I mean you hear about this happening but do you ever hear about a way to 
permanently prevent it? No. This is why governments have no choice but to get hackers....to fight hacking crimes. And they are doing a

piss poor job at that.  


universetwisters
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#15

Posted 07 August 2014 - 01:09 AM

I guess this is more reason as to not put everything online. It may be banks today and missiles tomorrow.


frankenstein107
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#16

Posted 07 August 2014 - 03:48 AM

I can't be the only one who thought this was going to be another milestone thread, right?

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theNGclan
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#17

Posted 07 August 2014 - 03:52 AM Edited by theNGclan, 07 August 2014 - 04:02 AM.

I guess this is more reason as to not put everything online. It may be banks today and missiles tomorrow.

That's stupid. If military weapons were on a network such as a banking database, we'd be f*cked already. It all depends on encryptions, filesystem, packets, the overall protection of the operating system overlaying the storage and the masking. They're more than likely running a highly complex version of Linux with a custom EXT file system, a LAN2NET masking kit, encryptions for every few hexadecimals of binary, etc.

 

OT: What websites/databases were attacked exactly? Does anyone know?


Ruuussia
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#18

Posted 07 August 2014 - 05:00 AM

Was easy


ddyoung
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#19

Posted 07 August 2014 - 05:01 AM

Does anyone know which websites were hit?


sivispacem
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#20

Posted 07 August 2014 - 07:33 AM

Does anyone know which websites were hit?


Unfortunately not, largely because the company who have reported it are trying to monetise it by offering to inform companies whether they were victims for a nominal fee.

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#21

Posted 07 August 2014 - 08:13 AM

Does anyone know which websites were hit?

Unfortunately not, largely because the company who have reported it are trying to monetise it by offering to inform companies whether they were victims for a nominal fee.
Wouldn't be surprised if that company had a hand in it.

Svip
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#22

Posted 07 August 2014 - 08:16 AM Edited by Svip, 07 August 2014 - 08:17 AM.

The story is also likely blown out of proportions. While the figure may technically be accurate, it doesn't seem like they were actually hacked.

Some quotes:
 

The biggest problem, as Forbes's Kashmir Hill and The Wall Street Journal's Danny Yadron have noted, is that Hold Security is already capitalizing on the panic, charging a $120-per-year subscription to anyone who wants to check if their name and password are on the list.


Instead, this data comes from hundreds of thousands of compromises over the course of months. Comparing it to breaches like Adobe or Target, as Perlroth does repeatedly, simply doesn't make sense.


Both Perlroth's article and Hold Security's description stop short of saying the group actually stole all 1.2 billion passwords. They just "eventually ended up" with them. We already know the gang started out by buying data from earlier hacks, but it's remarkably unclear where the bought data ends and the stolen data begins. Many of the passwords could have been old data from someone else's hack.


The most likely scenario is that this 'gang' bought user login details from the black market, careless of the actual content or quality.  It seems like quantity mattered most; we aren't even sure how much of the data is duplicated and how many times.

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Moth
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#23

Posted 07 August 2014 - 08:30 AM

So doesn't that add more credience to my theory that the company may have been behind it?

sivispacem
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#24

Posted 07 August 2014 - 08:47 AM

Not really.

I posted this in the other thread, but my understanding based on the discussions that are ongoing in the infosec scene us that this is basically a meta-database of amalgamated databases from other breaches. So it potentially contains data from breaches that haven't yet been publicly exposed, but also contains credentials harvested from Target, Adobe and they others who have recently been hit by the various Russian criminal syndicates. So the total figure is probably very misleading as it likely contains data from compromises where credentials have been revoked and clean-up completed long ago
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Svip
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#25

Posted 07 August 2014 - 08:53 AM

Not really.

I posted this in the other thread, but my understanding based on the discussions that are ongoing in the infosec scene us that this is basically a meta-database of amalgamated databases from other breaches. So it potentially contains data from breaches that haven't yet been publicly exposed, but also contains credentials harvested from Target, Adobe and they others who have recently been hit by the various Russian criminal syndicates. So the total figure is probably very misleading as it likely contains data from compromises where credentials have been revoked and clean-up completed long ago

 

Indeed.  And the company disclosing this is probably using the absurd number (which may be technically correct) to create panic.  Effectively - I assume - they saw an opportunity and took it.

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FRAIZER
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#26

Posted 07 August 2014 - 11:15 AM

I guess this is more reason as to not put everything online. It may be banks today and missiles tomorrow.


Well, it really comes down to how well these companies want to protect the customers. If these places take the easy way and don't take the proper precautions to protect customer info and data this kinda thing is going to happen.

Unfortunately, security is one of the things to be affected when budget cuts happen in companies.

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#27

Posted 07 August 2014 - 12:01 PM

Ok I'll change my password from Boobs_And_Asses_4_Life to Russian_gang_Suck_cock_And_They_Are_GaY

 

 

 

Oh sh*t

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#28

Posted 07 August 2014 - 01:10 PM

Smells like bullsh*t, Either that, or retardedly over exaggerated!


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#29

Posted 09 August 2014 - 10:50 AM

Thought it's a milestone.

GOT SHOCKED!  :panic:


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#30

Posted 09 August 2014 - 11:25 AM

Thought it's a milestone.

GOT SHOCKED!  :panic:

 

A milestone topic for 1.2 billion posts?

 

That seems unlikely :p





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