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The never ending debate... Petrol VS Diesel

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sivispacem
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#31

Posted 01 July 2014 - 06:50 AM

Mechanically simpler.

Anything but I'm afraid. Piezoelectric direct injection, multi-stage fuel pumps, variable-geometry turbochargers...diesel engines are more complex than petrol ones and have been for some time.
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Killerdude8
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#32

Posted 01 July 2014 - 01:07 PM

 

Mechanically simpler.

Anything but I'm afraid. Piezoelectric direct injection, multi-stage fuel pumps, variable-geometry turbochargers...diesel engines are more complex than petrol ones and have been for some time.

 

I suppose you're right, I think I used the Wrong word to describe it.

 

Lack of Wiring is probably a more appropriate term, Especially on older Diesels.

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SingingEwe954
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#33

Posted 02 July 2014 - 05:43 AM

Typically diesels last longer like on most 18 Wheelers the engines are fine until 1 million miles where then they usually do a overhaul to make it last longer, and in most diesel pickup trucks the can last well over 400,000 miles where in most gas engines they are lucky to get to 250,000
And there is also the point that diesels have more power, but unless you are hauling construction equipment around all day you typically could use a gasoline and have just as much performance

sivispacem
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#34

Posted 02 July 2014 - 08:53 AM

Difference is that the diesel engine on an 18 wheeler has about one fifth of the bhp/litre and one fifth the bhp/tonne of a car. The same is true to a lesser degree of pickups.

I mean, a Cumin's ISX plus ancillaries weighs the better part of two tonnes for 15L displacement, 600bhp and 2,000lb/ft. A 2L diesel from the likes of BMW will produce up to 240bhp and 400lb/ft for an engine plus ancillaries mass of circa 300kg. Engines of this size are simply in a much lower state of tune and therefore are liable to last longer.

Same is true of the big-block V8s of yore which produced about 25bhp/L- the weren't highly stressed so have a lower mean failure rate but are by virtue of that much less efficient.
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Svip
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#35

Posted 04 July 2014 - 07:06 AM

Regardless of your preference, if you are buying an old car, never buy diesel.  They will most likely be ruined by that point and you'll soon have to pay a big cheque getting that engine fixed or even replaced.  Diesel engines don't last long.  Not old ones, not modern ones.

 

To keep a diesel engine in good condition, you pretty much need it running all the time, this is why buying an old taxi is not a bad idea.  Taxis generally use diesel and since they are always running, their engines are kept 'fresh'.

 

But few old diesel cars are run like this.  If you want an old car that needs a chance of working, go for petrol.  It's always the safer bet.


Marwin Moody
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#36

Posted 04 July 2014 - 09:56 PM

What do you do with an old car that runs on leaded?


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#37

Posted 05 July 2014 - 06:17 AM

What do you do with an old car that runs on leaded?

 

You need lead substitute.  You can buy this at basically any petrol station.  After filling up, you dose into your tank the amount needed.  Usually it's 1 ml per litre.

 

Considering that my car runs on leaded, I have a few bottles of lead substitute.  It's really very simple to do.

 

And no, it's not actual lead, it's just something that behaves like it for the purpose of keeping the engine working.

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Whiskey
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#38

Posted 05 July 2014 - 06:27 PM

Diesels are only good if they're well serviced. As Svip says, you could be buying a total lemon of a car, e.g. you could pick up a 1.9 TDI and the injectors could go on the way home, and over here one injector (Bosch/Siemens) for a VW is around 300 - 400 quid. 


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#39

Posted 05 July 2014 - 08:03 PM

Recently bought a Clio 1.5 DCi, 75 horsepower speed machine, solely to save money on fuel. The old Golf I had could muster 23 mpg if I was real nice to it, but the Clio is rated at 64 mpg, and I can easily pull 58 out of it. It's slow as sin, but I'm saving at least 200 euros a month on fuel, which almost covers the financing.


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#40

Posted 31 July 2014 - 11:06 AM

Regardless of your preference, if you are buying an old car, never buy diesel.  They will most likely be ruined by that point and you'll soon have to pay a big cheque getting that engine fixed or even replaced.  Diesel engines don't last long.  Not old ones, not modern ones.

 

To keep a diesel engine in good condition, you pretty much need it running all the time, this is why buying an old taxi is not a bad idea.  Taxis generally use diesel and since they are always running, their engines are kept 'fresh'.

 

But few old diesel cars are run like this.  If you want an old car that needs a chance of working, go for petrol.  It's always the safer bet.

 

Diesels don't last as long? That's a new one. They usually last longer than petrol.


SouthLand
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#41

Posted 01 August 2014 - 05:59 AM

Drove a VW Golf GTD the other day... I didn't like it at all honestly.


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#42

Posted 01 August 2014 - 07:14 AM

Drove a VW Golf GTD the other day... I didn't like it at all honestly.

There's a Diesel Jetta running around my Neighbourhood, He's got the exhaust goin through the hood, and whenever he takes off from a stop, lets off a massive black cloud of smoke.


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#43

Posted 01 August 2014 - 05:30 PM

 

 

Mechanically simpler.

Anything but I'm afraid. Piezoelectric direct injection, multi-stage fuel pumps, variable-geometry turbochargers...diesel engines are more complex than petrol ones and have been for some time.

 

I suppose you're right, I think I used the Wrong word to describe it.

 

Lack of Wiring is probably a more appropriate term, Especially on older Diesels.

 

As he said, this really only applies to old diesels.

 

Newer diesels have adopted everything the Devil saddled the gasoline engine with - electronics, throttle valves, all sorts of annoying sensors in the intake and exhaust, check engine lights if you dare to do anything, emissions systems that cost more than the engine..

 

Give me a good old mechanical diesel and I won't want for anything. (except maybe power but that can be fixed :monocle: )

 

Newer diesels? Aside from fuel economy, they don't appeal to me. You can still do a lot of things if you like spending money.. They can be tuned, emissions junk can be deleted, but it's all much more expensive and complicated.


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#44

Posted 01 August 2014 - 05:52 PM

I wouldn't mind one of those old Mercedes Diesels. The ones you can run on old cooking oil. Besides that I don't really have any interest in owning a diesel car. BMW do a really good 330/530 diesel engine, but thats probably the only one I would realistically consider owning. Also it seems that a lot of places are tightening restrictions on use of diesel cars theses days. I saw a news report a few days ago in the UK that suggested making diesel owners pay a surchage for driving in cities!!


Marwin Moody
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#45

Posted 01 August 2014 - 09:39 PM

Okay, so after 2 weeks of having my license and 1500 kilometres of driving a 200 horsepower turbocharged 5-speed from the late 80s I gotta say, I'd be living a much easier life with a 6-speed volkswagen diesel. This SAAB is tearing into my wallet like a crane fly during summer. I've got a negative balance in my bank account and about 10 dollars to my name. At least it sounds spectacular roaring down a country road!


Svip
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#46

Posted 02 August 2014 - 03:57 PM

 

Regardless of your preference, if you are buying an old car, never buy diesel.  They will most likely be ruined by that point and you'll soon have to pay a big cheque getting that engine fixed or even replaced.  Diesel engines don't last long.  Not old ones, not modern ones.

 

To keep a diesel engine in good condition, you pretty much need it running all the time, this is why buying an old taxi is not a bad idea.  Taxis generally use diesel and since they are always running, their engines are kept 'fresh'.

 

But few old diesel cars are run like this.  If you want an old car that needs a chance of working, go for petrol.  It's always the safer bet.

 

Diesels don't last as long? That's a new one. They usually last longer than petrol.

 

 

And general they should, but old diesel engines for production cars tended to be terrible.  So it's generally a good idea to avoid old cars with diesel engines, because A) they are likely badly constructed and B) badly maintained.


Moth
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#47

Posted 03 August 2014 - 06:07 AM

 

Drove a VW Golf GTD the other day... I didn't like it at all honestly.

There's a Diesel Jetta running around my Neighbourhood, He's got the exhaust goin through the hood, and whenever he takes off from a stop, lets off a massive black cloud of smoke.

 

Yeah, around here there is a diesel Golf going around like that. I feel like he is trying to roll coal like the big boys, but can't afford a diesel pickup. 


sivispacem
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#48

Posted 03 August 2014 - 07:56 AM


 


Drove a VW Golf GTD the other day... I didn't like it at all honestly.

There's a Diesel Jetta running around my Neighbourhood, He's got the exhaust goin through the hood, and whenever he takes off from a stop, lets off a massive black cloud of smoke.
 
Yeah, around here there is a diesel Golf going around like that. I feel like he is trying to roll coal like the big boys, but can't afford a diesel pickup. 
Rolling coal, or a fork thereof, has been popular in Europe since the first turbocharged diesels of the late 80s and early 90s. Obviously using German and French hatchbacks.
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visionist
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#49

Posted 28 August 2014 - 05:12 PM

Here in Southern Italy the only petrol cars you see are very small hatchbacks. Most cars are very small hatchbacks however. There is now an increasing majority buying diesel engined small cars just for trips to the shops which is the very definition of "marketing doing its job"; suckering automotive illiterates into paying more up-front for something which might save them an Euro or two on fuel but when it goes wrong- and it will- through lack of proper use will have to be fixed at great expense a couple of years down the line, just after the warranty has expired.

 

Me? I'm after a 3.2 litre petrol, and I'll be spending at least a hundred Euros a week on fuel, probably more. Every fool gets to be young once.

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ggrobertsk48485
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#50

Posted 31 August 2014 - 09:54 PM

Petrol all the way.

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#51

Posted 15 September 2014 - 12:10 AM

petrol. diesel smell awful imo.

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#52

Posted 15 September 2014 - 01:14 AM

For any sort of car or truck that's not gonna be pulling anything big i'd go gasoline without a doubt. The only time i want diesel is for a truck that will nearly always be pulling a large trailer of some kind.

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SouthLand
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#53

Posted 15 September 2014 - 07:11 AM Edited by SouthLand, 15 September 2014 - 07:18 AM.

 

 

Mind you, diesel tuning done right is pretty impressive. I drove a stage 3 A4 2.0 TDI Quattro running a Garrett hybrid with about 230whp and 450lb ft and it was bloody fast.

 

That's what i don't understand... Why do people buy diesel cars for Racing?

 

More torque, Very Low maintenance, Mechanically simpler.

 

That and depending on where you live, Diesel is Cheaper, and Diesel engines are more efficient, Which means more time racing, less time in the pit.

 

 

Min 0:15

 

=

Min 4:36

 

 

 

 

Oh and by the way, i also have an Ibiza with a Miltek exhaust like the first video and it sounds like this (My car. And yes, the engine was hot when i did this video) :

 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PEH6HeuKhwk

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