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Halogen Cipher 1.1

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AlexSniperBullet
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#1

Posted 30 May 2014 - 03:44 AM Edited by AlexSniperBullet, 30 May 2014 - 03:46 AM.

Aside from making a chat for GTANet. I made a program a few months ago called Halogen Cipher and updated it today. Basically it's an encryption software using math & algebra.  

 

It converts each word or character that are on the US keyboard to numbers. then the master key is then used to add them up and store those settings onto a flash drive or wherever, to use for later to decrypt.

 

Algorithm Subs is to replace the numbers by different letters. the subs will also be stored in the algorithm file. So all you would need is the algorithm file + master key to decrypt the text.

 

The Hashed key is a display to indicate if all the keys were refreshed. nothing serious going on there  

 

 

Download: http://www.softpedia...en-Cipher.shtml

 

 

Snapshots:

Halogen-Cipher_2.png

Halogen-Cipher_3.png

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Sentrion
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#2

Posted 31 May 2014 - 02:23 AM

Useful tool mate. I always found encryption to be safe medium for storage of files. What's the text clipboard limit on this software?

AlexSniperBullet
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#3

Posted 31 May 2014 - 02:31 AM

Useful tool mate. I always found encryption to be safe medium for storage of files. What's the text clipboard limit on this software?

I would probably say less 50,000. takes about 5-10 seconds to encrypt the text that large. another 10 seconds when using substitutes values. 


K^2
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#4

Posted 01 June 2014 - 02:53 AM

Simple substitution ciphers are among the weakest. (The only way to make it worse is go with Caesar.) A human can typically crack it with just a few sentences of cipher text. I used to crack notes written with substitution ciphers in school for fun. A smart algorithm can usually do even better than that using combination of frequency and dictionary attacks. About the only good use for simple substitution is leaving cryptic messages that are meant to be cracked as a sort of a puzzle. Consider, for example, alien alphabet in Futurama, or Ancient in Stargate series.

 

There are a number of fairly simple ciphers that are far, far better. A good polyalphabetic cipher, such as Vigenere Cipher, is already tough to crack without special software and significant cipher text. But they are still far from secure. Get enough text with the same key out there, and so long as someone guesses Vigenerre and the language message is written in, they'll be able to crack the entire table. (Simple sub can be viewed as simple special case of Vigenere, so software designed to crack these will spit out a key for your code instantly.) Still, if you want to write code yourself and try for something a bit more advanced, it's good exercise.

 

For a good algorithm, take a look at something like Blowfish or AES. They are much tougher to implement, but there are standard libraries for them. And if used right, they can be virtually impossible to crack without the key.

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AlexSniperBullet
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#5

Posted 01 June 2014 - 04:35 AM

Simple substitution ciphers are among the weakest. (The only way to make it worse is go with Caesar.) A human can typically crack it with just a few sentences of cipher text. I used to crack notes written with substitution ciphers in school for fun. A smart algorithm can usually do even better than that using combination of frequency and dictionary attacks. About the only good use for simple substitution is leaving cryptic messages that are meant to be cracked as a sort of a puzzle. Consider, for example, alien alphabet in Futurama, or Ancient in Stargate series.

 

There are a number of fairly simple ciphers that are far, far better. A good polyalphabetic cipher, such as Vigenere Cipher, is already tough to crack without special software and significant cipher text. But they are still far from secure. Get enough text with the same key out there, and so long as someone guesses Vigenerre and the language message is written in, they'll be able to crack the entire table. (Simple sub can be viewed as simple special case of Vigenere, so software designed to crack these will spit out a key for your code instantly.) Still, if you want to write code yourself and try for something a bit more advanced, it's good exercise.

 

For a good algorithm, take a look at something like Blowfish or AES. They are much tougher to implement, but there are standard libraries for them. And if used right, they can be virtually impossible to crack without the key.

 

it's not the best but it's better than nothing. i pretty much know what you mean how people would crack it.  i could think lots of ways on how to prevent it. 


K^2
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#6

Posted 01 June 2014 - 06:18 AM

it's not the best but it's better than nothing.

With encryption, that simply isn't true. It's better to use nothing, and know that you're talking in the open, where everyone can see what you say, than to use an inadequate piece of software and think what you are saying is secure, when it can, in fact, be read by just about anyone.

Writing things like that is good exercise, but you really shouldn't be presenting it as a working product.

AlexSniperBullet
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#7

Posted 01 June 2014 - 07:03 AM

well it's meant for entertainment tbh lol 


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#8

Posted 01 June 2014 - 09:44 PM

That's fair. But yeah, try polyalphabetic cipher. It's at least human-proof.

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