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BrownBear
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#1

Posted 02 April 2014 - 10:03 AM

Basically, I f*cked up my education pretty bad.

My job prospects don't look great but that doesn't bother me too much, what bothers me is the thought o rotting in this little town with a dead end job. So I was thinking, what sort of opportunities are there for manual work abroad? I've heard of Brits going to Australia and working on mines and stuff, are there other things like this? 


K20
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#2

Posted 02 April 2014 - 10:24 AM

where in UK you from and what skills do you have... or passion in doing? 


lil weasel
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#3

Posted 02 April 2014 - 11:07 AM Edited by lil weasel, 02 April 2014 - 11:08 AM.

Most of the educational propaganda is just that. A trick to keep second rated people out of jobs.

IF you can read, have a good hand (writing) and do simple everyday maths you can get decent employment, except from racist employers who use the sheepskin as an excuse to deny employment..

Not everyone needs to be 'higher' educated. Especially with all the fancy computer run clerking that is available.

Since you have already considered the Mining.

How much University training does it take to work a touch-screen:

What about the Technology Schools.

  • Restaurant (Food Industry) Serving, cooking, busing.
  • Hotel services.
  • Automotive: Counter work in parts department, customer services. Detailing.
  • Real Estate: Selling, carpentry, electrical, and other construction trades (apprenticeships)
  • Merchant marine. Longshoremen.
  • Military Service.
  • Security Services.
  • Boiler Room sales
  • And, the best part is until you are Forty Years of Age you can quit and seek other employment when any job becomes boring.

 

As a human animal you are only required to earn enough money to keep you fed and housed, with some entertainment.


BrownBear
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#4

Posted 02 April 2014 - 11:54 AM

Cheers, I've actually been thinking about the Merchant Navy. I would join the military but I feel I'd be going against my beliefs.

I didn't finish my GCSEs, but I have an equivalent grade; I'm not stupid or anything, I just had a lot of trouble with the school environment, not the learning.


Ben73
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#5

Posted 02 April 2014 - 12:02 PM

Don't come to Australia for mining. Our boom was 3-4 years ago. It's all slowed down lately. Many people in mines losing jobs.

 

Apparently new mines opening in my area over the next few years. But other mines are slowing down. So yeah maybe in a few year there will be another boom.,


Slave Boy
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#6

Posted 02 April 2014 - 04:34 PM Edited by Graven, 02 April 2014 - 04:37 PM.

Re-educate if it´s free. Here it is.


Vlynor
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#7

Posted 02 April 2014 - 04:40 PM

Doesn't the O&G industry need Landmen in Canada and the North West US? I heard they pay a ton, too, upwards of $100,000 or so.


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#8

Posted 02 April 2014 - 05:30 PM

You say you don't function in the environment of a school, why not to study from home then? A high school diploma is really the bare minimum. As for jobs abroad, look into the O&G industry, there are plenty of relatively high-paying positions that don't require a undegrad/grad degree.


BrownBear
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#9

Posted 02 April 2014 - 05:37 PM

Doesn't the O&G industry need Landmen in Canada and the North West US? I heard they pay a ton, too, upwards of $100,000 or so.

That's like working on oil rig in the middle of nowhere? I could see yself doing that for a bit.

Would you have to be a Canadian citizen to get into that sort of thing?


orbitalraindrops
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#10

Posted 02 April 2014 - 05:58 PM

You could always try becoming self employed and become an entrepreneur. It'd be hard work and you'd need a pretty solid business plan but if being in the employ or education of other people doesn't work out it'd be good to fall back on. Just figure out what you want to do. What are your passions?


Vlynor
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#11

Posted 02 April 2014 - 06:00 PM

 

Doesn't the O&G industry need Landmen in Canada and the North West US? I heard they pay a ton, too, upwards of $100,000 or so.

That's like working on oil rig in the middle of nowhere? I could see yself doing that for a bit.

Would you have to be a Canadian citizen to get into that sort of thing?

 

 

I think you can get a work visa if you secure a job beforehand. But, I'm not sure. I'm not up-to-date on Canadian work visa laws.


lil weasel
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#12

Posted 02 April 2014 - 06:24 PM

 

Doesn't the O&G industry need Landmen in Canada and the North West US? I heard they pay a ton, too, upwards of $100,000 or so.

That's like working on oil rig in the middle of nowhere? I could see yself doing that for a bit.

Would you have to be a Canadian citizen to get into that sort of thing?

 

Check it out: http://www.cic.gc.ca...ations/work.asp


D- Ice
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#13

Posted 02 April 2014 - 07:12 PM Edited by D- Ice, 02 April 2014 - 07:13 PM.

I'd just like to dispel the myth that good grades at school results in good jobs. The whole point of compulsory school education is (or at least should be) twofold; to teach children basic skills that will help them out in later life, and to seperate children into academic skills levels using exams. Not getting high enough grades does not mean you have ruined your life - it just means that you are perhaps not the more academic type.

Academic jobs are not necessarily the highest-paying (as with the good example Vlynor gave), and the highest-paying jobs are not necessarily the best - that is highly subjective. Some jobs pay a lot because either their conditions are undesirable otherwise (e.g. dangerous working environment), or require undesirable specialist training or education beforehand (e.g. long university courses like medicine or law). In most countries with uncorrupt employment systems, you roughly get paid what you sacrifice.

 

I have unfortunately been fed the bullsh*t of 'good grades = good (high-paying) job' for most of my life by my parents. It is only recently towards the end of a medical degree that I have been struggling and suffering through, and after seeing the highly-stressful work environment of a hospital doctor that I realised the higher pay is compensation rather than a good deal. Someone working a minimum-wage job is getting an equally good deal as they won't have to endure as much crap.

 

My advice would be to firstly consider what type of employment you enjoy - I'm not sure if you actually enjoy manual work, or are just feeling you have no other options. Even if you didn't do so well in your exams, I am sure there are plenty of other opportunities to pursue more academic work.

Then, secondly, my advice would be to consider how much you personally value money. How much are you willing to sacrifice in terms of time, effort, discomfort, safety, etc... for that larger pay-cheque.

Hopefully that should give you a rough idea of the type of job that's right for you, without any of the ignorant and over-simplified miscinceptions about good vs. bad jobs.

 

Hope that helps bro. :)


universetwisters
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#14

Posted 02 April 2014 - 08:52 PM Edited by universetwisters, 02 April 2014 - 08:53 PM.

Here in America, they're making a pipeline in North Dakota. The days are cold and the hours are long, but the pay is good.

 

You should give it a look into.


blitz
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#15

Posted 02 April 2014 - 10:03 PM

Well, a kid I know that dropped out last year has been working as a plumber recently, and he's made lot of money. I also have a friend who started working in IT as soon as he was done with high school and he's been doing quite well.


BrownBear
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#16

Posted 02 April 2014 - 10:07 PM

D-Ice: Cheers, mate. I'd say I am a pretty academic person, I love to read and write, in fact I've always wanted to be a journalist. At the same time though, I feel it would be easier to do something like taxi or truck driving when I'm old enough. I had the idea of doing work abroad for a year or two to get some money and experience, I've got a couple mates who want to do it too so that will help in a big way if it works out.

This is all theoretical though, I'm just thinking about what I'm gonna do in the near future.


BarelyLegal
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#17

Posted 02 April 2014 - 10:32 PM Edited by BarelyLegal, 02 April 2014 - 10:35 PM.

I got average grades at school, and very high grades in College.

 

I recently had a job interview with this Company, for the role of a Trainee IT Systems Administrator. Whilst they were impressed with my College grades, I firmly believe that didn't have much bearing on them choosing me. Apparently there were 8 people called for interview, and I was the only one called back for a second. 

 

I later spoke to the person I'm shadowing (basically where I learn from him on-the-job), and he said that my interviewer (also the Head of the IT department) picked me because I was the only one that actually seemed eager, and not full of myself. I seemed genuine, willing to learn, and was fully aware that there were aspects of the job I was not so familiar with (hence applying for a Trainee role). I got the job because whilst I've got some all-rounded knowledge on computers and computer programs already, I really wanted to learn. In the future, I'll be going to University part-time, one afternoon a week. I get to pick a course of my choosing, and it's going to be difficult. It will improve my knowledge even further. They're going to invest in my study, so they must have faith. Faith that I can become an asset to them, as could anyone else who displays the same traits.

 

When applying for a job, just really get-across your desire for the role. If I was a manager, I'd rather an enthusiastic person with lesser grades and is willing to pursue their interests, than an individual with higher grades and is full of themselves because of it.


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#18

Posted 03 April 2014 - 12:14 AM

 

Doesn't the O&G industry need Landmen in Canada and the North West US? I heard they pay a ton, too, upwards of $100,000 or so.

That's like working on oil rig in the middle of nowhere? I could see yself doing that for a bit.

Would you have to be a Canadian citizen to get into that sort of thing?

 

 

Well you could consider oil rig work in the North Sea. Sure, it wouldn't be as adventurous as going abroad, but I know someone who was in your position about seven years ago and now makes good money on offshore rigs.

 

On a personal level I really respect what you're doing. A part of me wishes that I'd had the courage to join the British or Israeli military to see the world, gain skills and grow as a person instead of suckling on the teat of higher education before settling for some office job a few years down the line. Great grades are a blessing, but good grades are a curse.

 

 

Best of luck to you, friend.


Misbegotten cad
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#19

Posted 03 April 2014 - 08:25 AM

I dunno about working abroad, but I know working a broad, if you know what I mean, wink wink, nod nod...


Black & White
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#20

Posted 06 April 2014 - 07:07 PM

You don't have much to lose. Why not become a successful criminal? You've played enough GTA, so you are semi-prepared.


WTFThisIsntWii
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#21

Posted 06 April 2014 - 07:20 PM Edited by WTFThisIsntWii, 06 April 2014 - 07:35 PM.

Would recommend the military, heaps of opportunities to travel to various different countries and I'm not just talking third world/war torn ones but also countries such as Sweden, Japan, US, UK ans New Zealand.

Well I know where I live they pay for our rent, insurance and bills. We also get discounts when buying houses and cars. Not to mention they'll completely pay for any University or trade course you want to do. In Australia all military personnel also get a above average salary. I know lots of countries the military get hardly anything. But Australia is great because our force is small. Starting salary for the lowest rank is $88,000 a year on top of the bonuses I listed. Plus guaranteed pay rises for every year of service and for every promotion. Everything's paid for so your salary is like spending money. In fact when deployed we were specifically told not to discuss our pay with American or British troops as we get significantly more.

There's a wide range of fields it's not all about shooting guns. There's medical, engineering, IT, logistics, transport, catering, aviation, education and more. Not to mention even if you decide to leave in the future any employers will see that you've done military service on your resume and it's honestly a huge advantage. Lots of mine sites, security agencies and the Police take in exmilitary.

Not to mention you have stable employment and can renew your contract after your ROSO if you choose. You'll have a great time lots of parties, adventures and travelling.

Lots of you British mob are joining our forces.

They also develop you into a respectful, independent, mature, confidant bloke and you gain many interpersonal skills.

Hell I was terrible at school and didn't finish highscool left at Grade 10. Joined up straight away, applied to become an Officer.

Now my classmates who stayed in school have graduated last year. Most of them are either doing a first year university course or working part time. By this time I've already been deployed twice, visited over 8 countries, I'm earning over $100,000+ a year. Just got promoted and I'm directly in charge of around 250 men.

I've also been able to move ahead in life quicker then most as I have managed to pay off my own house, I own two cars bought brand new both not older then 2011 models. Subaru Impreza and Toyota 86. Managed to get engaged to my highschool sweetheart she's only 16 so can't get married yet. She's since moved in with me, her parents allowed it as well as a judge because I was able to prove I was responsible and could provide and care for her. We also have a 3 month old son. I've not even hit 20 yet. It amazes me how much has happened in the last 5 years.

Have a diploma in government. Countless certificates for first aid, leadership and other courses. Studying towards an electrical engineering degree. I've also been looking at other options in case I decide to leave the military. Got offered an interview for the Australian Police in their tactical division which is like the SWAT. Also got offered an interview by a INPEX a new gas plant being built here.
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SingularSoul
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#22

Posted 06 April 2014 - 08:18 PM

Would recommend the military, heaps of opportunities to travel to various different countries and I'm not just talking third world/war torn ones but also countries such as Sweden, Japan, US, UK ans New Zealand.

Well I know where I live they pay for our rent, insurance and bills. We also get discounts when buying houses and cars. Not to mention they'll completely pay for any University or trade course you want to do. In Australia all military personnel also get a above average salary. I know lots of countries the military get hardly anything. But Australia is great because our force is small. Starting salary for the lowest rank is $88,000 a year on top of the bonuses I listed. Plus guaranteed pay rises for every year of service and for every promotion. Everything's paid for so your salary is like spending money. In fact when deployed we were specifically told not to discuss our pay with American or British troops as we get significantly more.

There's a wide range of fields it's not all about shooting guns. There's medical, engineering, IT, logistics, transport, catering, aviation, education and more. Not to mention even if you decide to leave in the future any employers will see that you've done military service on your resume and it's honestly a huge advantage. Lots of mine sites, security agencies and the Police take in exmilitary.

Not to mention you have stable employment and can renew your contract after your ROSO if you choose. You'll have a great time lots of parties, adventures and travelling.

Lots of you British mob are joining our forces.

They also develop you into a respectful, independent, mature, confidant bloke and you gain many interpersonal skills.

Hell I was terrible at school and didn't finish highscool left at Grade 10. Joined up straight away, applied to become an Officer.

Now my classmates who stayed in school have graduated last year. Most of them are either doing a first year university course or working part time. By this time I've already been deployed twice, visited over 8 countries, I'm earning over $100,000+ a year. Just got promoted and I'm directly in charge of around 250 men.

I've also been able to move ahead in life quicker then most as I have managed to pay off my own house, I own two cars bought brand new both not older then 2011 models. Subaru Impreza and Toyota 86. Managed to get engaged to my highschool sweetheart she's only 16 so can't get married yet. She's since moved in with me, her parents allowed it as well as a judge because I was able to prove I was responsible and could provide and care for her. We also have a 3 month old son. I've not even hit 20 yet. It amazes me how much has happened in the last 5 years.

Have a diploma in government. Countless certificates for first aid, leadership and other courses. Studying towards an electrical engineering degree. I've also been looking at other options in case I decide to leave the military. Got offered an interview for the Australian Police in their tactical division which is like the SWAT. Also got offered an interview by a INPEX a new gas plant being built here.

 

Dude; Honestly, I can't thank you enough. I really don't know what I want to do with myself in life, and your post has opened my mind up to avenues I hadn't previously considered.

Kudos for being so successful in life so quickly too man. Sounds like you've got your "house in order" so to speak. :)


BrownBear
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#23

Posted 06 April 2014 - 11:22 PM

WTF: I have thought about this but I have some moral objections although I have been considering it. I am a British citizen, but my dad is from Turkey, I want to get a Turkish citizenship which I could easily do but I would have to do military service, I am thinking about doing this, are there any Turks here who did national service?


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#24

Posted 07 April 2014 - 04:14 AM

WTF: I have thought about this but I have some moral objections although I have been considering it. I am a British citizen, but my dad is from Turkey, I want to get a Turkish citizenship which I could easily do but I would have to do military service, I am thinking about doing this, are there any Turks here who did national service?


I'd recommend you really look into both of the militaries before jumping to a decision. A lot of the time it's not just which country your from that they'll take into account.

They also take into account where you grew up, where your schooling was done and which culture you associate more with. For example we have lots of Asians here some culturally are definitely close to Chinese culture while others speak perfect English, have an Aussie accent, understand our slang and enjoy Australian pasttimes such as footy. Those ones I'd say are more Australian culturally.

You may be Turkish but where did you grow up and are your mates all British. You may find the British forces better as you'll be able to fit in more and understand their jokes, slang and how the country works.

BrownBear
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#25

Posted 11 April 2014 - 11:37 PM

Just a quick update, I've managed to get an apprenticeship in gardening. Not what I was expecting but I'm actually enjoying it, I'd still like to work abroad in future, but at least I've got some direction for now.

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lil weasel
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#26

Posted 11 April 2014 - 11:59 PM

[W]e have lots of Asians here some culturally are definitely close to Chinese culture while others speak perfect English, have an Aussie accent, understand our slang and enjoy Australian pasttimes such as footy. Those ones I'd say are more Australian culturally.

I hardly believe that the ability to 'speak' a foreign language, accents, and it's idioms defines national culture. Those are precisely the traits needed for a infiltration (sleeper) agent.

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#27

Posted 12 April 2014 - 01:40 AM

Just a quick update, I've managed to get an apprenticeship in gardening. Not what I was expecting but I'm actually enjoying it, I'd still like to work abroad in future, but at least I've got some direction for now.


nice one man! This is my first post on your topic but I have read through it... I feel the same about my life man. I have a friend in toronto I really wanna visit and perhaps work for a bit but no money= no hope. Its a damning situation because Im in a sh*thole town too, wouldnt happen to be in Essex would you? haha
Hey, look at this way you could start saving for your adventures abroad now you are working... my advice open a savings account with your bank if you dont have one and put something in it regularly before you know it youll be sitting on a spare grand

WTFThisIsntWii
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#28

Posted 12 April 2014 - 02:50 AM

[W]e have lots of Asians here some culturally are definitely close to Chinese culture while others speak perfect English, have an Aussie accent, understand our slang and enjoy Australian pasttimes such as footy. Those ones I'd say are more Australian culturally.

I hardly believe that the ability to 'speak' a foreign language, accents, and it's idioms defines national culture. Those are precisely the traits needed for a infiltration (sleeper) agent.

An accent, slang and language is part of culture. When someone speaks you instantly know which country they're from. Well then by your logic our whole army are sleeper agents.

BrownBear
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#29

Posted 12 April 2014 - 08:39 AM

 

 

[W]e have lots of Asians here some culturally are definitely close to Chinese culture while others speak perfect English, have an Aussie accent, understand our slang and enjoy Australian pasttimes such as footy. Those ones I'd say are more Australian culturally.

I hardly believe that the ability to 'speak' a foreign language, accents, and it's idioms defines national culture. Those are precisely the traits needed for a infiltration (sleeper) agent.

An accent, slang and language is part of culture. When someone speaks you instantly know which country they're from. Well then by your logic our whole army are sleeper agents.

 

Personally, I'd say it's down to the person which culture they feel more at home in. I've lived in England all my life and ally my frieds are English, but at the same time I grew up visiting my Irish grandparents regularly and my mum singing IRA songs, and my dad always telling me stories of Turkey and though I can't speak it, I grew up around my dad speaking Turkish. So I'm not sure where I feel more at home, I am British but I've still grown up in a different culture from my mates.

Mike: Thanks man, I live in Wiltshire myself. I've already got a bit saved from my last job so I'll have a decent amount soon, planning on going to Amsterdam with my mates this summer. I've got relatives in Canada, Turkey, Ireland, New Zealand, USA and Australia so I'm hoping I can go out and work with them in the future.


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#30

Posted 12 April 2014 - 08:43 AM

Make some YouTube videos of learning to garden and beg for likes and subscribers... It's " in " thing to do.




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