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Should I get the Anamorphic version of a blu ray movie?

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esmittystud101
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#1

Posted 11 March 2014 - 01:35 PM

My son is turning three and he really likes the Spiderman movies. I was going to get them all in Blu Ray to meet my appeal as well. There are so many versions of these movies I'm starting to get confussed. They have really good deals on the Anamorphic versions of the blu rays. But they also have regular blu rays. What version should I get? I use HDTV's with HDMI cables. Any suggestions?


Otter
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#2

Posted 11 March 2014 - 05:09 PM

Post a link to the blurays online, if you can.

Anamorphic is a bit of a dated term these days and troubling when you see it in relation to bluray - could indicate a number of factors: is the film anamorphic? Is it using anamorphic (non square) pixels? Is it... God forbid... Interlaced? To add to the problem, sites like amazon will just relay some of this information verbatim without any context.

A lot of the first generation blurays went through this technology-meets-marketing growing pain, but you should be able to find a newer release and look for the reviews for someone who talks specifically about visual quality.

At the end of the day, if the bluray was put out in the past four years, you can be assured that the whole picture's in there, wether it says anamorphic or not.

CatDog96
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#3

Posted 11 March 2014 - 05:36 PM

I've only read the books, I didn't even know they released spider-man on blu ray.

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esmittystud101
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#4

Posted 11 March 2014 - 07:07 PM Edited by esmittystud101, 11 March 2014 - 07:07 PM.

LOL. What I find even funnier is that I actually had to read some of those books when I was a kid. The Pictures of the movies online are horrible, each site is crappy. Doesn't even say Anamorphic on them or anything. Just cover art.The more studing I've done today, people are saying there is nothing wrong with them and that they are excellent quality blu ray's. Some guy talked about them not having the black lines on the top and bottom when the movies are playing. That you get more screen basically. But another guy gave me a page long answer that was talking about 16:9 ratio vs something else ratio. I got kinda confussed. I don't know why I worry about things like that, I should just go buy the movie and quit overthinking my purchases.

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zuckmeslow
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#5

Posted 16 March 2014 - 08:42 PM

i have never heard of anamporphic blu rays. if a movie is filmed in anamporphic then shouldnt the blu ray be in anamorphic too? and if it wasnt filmed in anamporphic then blu ray shouldnt be in anamorphic.

 

but if widescreen and full screen are the choices then widescreen but only if it was filmed on widescreen.


RARusk
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#6

Posted 17 March 2014 - 12:33 AM

Remember "pan and scan"? This was a way for a movie to fill up the entirety of a standard 4:3 television set regardless of the screen dimensions of a movie. "Pan and scan" refers to panning over a scene and showing the most relevant part of it. The only way to view an entire movie without this method is to get the letterboxed version where you have the black bars on the top and bottom but kept the dimensions intact.

 

Anamorphic is similar to "pan and scan" in that it is designed to fit the entire image on a screen but it differs in that it is for widescreen sets. This means that you can watch a 16:9 movie on a 16:9 set and have it fill up the entire screen. Great if you have a monster set.


esmittystud101
  • esmittystud101

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#7

Posted 17 March 2014 - 12:40 PM

I ended up getting them. They are not bad. No black lines in top or bottom. Nice picture. Can't complain.


Slamman
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#8

Posted 17 March 2014 - 02:50 PM Edited by Slamman, 17 March 2014 - 02:57 PM.

Far as I know, DVDs moving to Anamorphic usually supported both formats, and that transition happened long ago. Some companies are more supportive of home media tech, IIRC, first to roll out DVD Nationwide in the USA was Warner Bros, so they supported various tech rollouts for optical media as such. Some companies like Paramount were highly selective for special edition release, with virtually no logic I could figure out. But they did do a few special feature discs over the years.

 

Read the fine print, but yes, a 16:9 aspect TV will look it's best in anamorphic, or it would look artificially compressed on other aspect ratios. If I'm recalling correctly.

 

I only bought about 3 BD discs so far though. Not into the Superhero genre so I can't get specific about those releases. I know in the latter days of LaserDisc, even some anamorphic ONLY discs came out, This was hampered by the nature of LD. As I recall, again, this was some years ago so I'm rusty on the subject, but I did read based on my locale in the USA, that UK or overseas, widescreen became more of a standard in homes then here in the US, maybe by several years, I don't know the detail specifics, but I'm comfortable stating this as fact.

 

I disagree that anamorphic is related to Pan and Scan, that doesn't make sense because it's based on the actual FILM CAMERA LENSES, pan and scan is entirely artificial POST PRODUCTION practice. To put it simply, Pan and Scan is for home video release, Anamorphic is in keeping films shot in scope, as accurate for home viewing as they were cinematically photographed.

 

Here's a Google search to try and cull any differences from theatrical to home cinema, but I don't see a clear link topic....

https://www.google.c..._sm=93&ie=UTF-8


Mr.Scratch
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#9

Posted 17 March 2014 - 03:07 PM

I'd ask if they've got a LaserDisc version, OP.

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Otter
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#10

Posted 17 March 2014 - 03:17 PM

Anamorphism is relevant in two cases here.

One: was the film shot with anamorphic lenses? That is, to fit a widescreen image onto a 35mm filmstrip, the image is stretched using lenses when shot, and reversed when projected.

Two: in the past and some legacy video formats today, the pixels used to display the image are not square. "Fullscreen" 4:3 dvds (usually a pan'nscan, but depends on the source) are 720x480/6, but the pixels are 10:9. 16:9 dvds are the exact same pixel definition but use wide rectangular pixels, or "anamorphic" pixel aspect ratios.


Thank god we've moved on from most of this stuff.




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