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Considering building a Gaming PC

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Andreas
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#31

Posted 15 February 2014 - 04:21 PM Edited by Andreas, 15 February 2014 - 04:22 PM.

Have fun paying hundreds of dollars every few months just so you can keep up to date with the current hardware standards for PC games then.

Upgrading the PC every few months gives you little to no benefits, thus it's pointless. No-one who knows anything about computers would ever do that. If you choose the hardware wisely, then the system will last for a couple of years at least if you are fine with not maxing out all of your games. For example, I still use the GTX460, which launched in August 2010, and I can still play most games on high settings. Settings such as anti aliasing have to be kept low, or disabled when using FXAA/SMAA, but games are still graphically far superior compared to the consoles. Of course that will change once the first true next-gen games launch, but again, if you choose the hardware wisely, it will last for more than just a few months. A High-End PC that is able to max out every game won't turn into a Low- or Mid-End system in a few months.
 

Motherboard:
-some gamers say good graphichs card is the most important hardware for PC gamer. Not so!
-for Motherboard is the backbone of your PC. To be able to run games fast, you need a high end motherboard that has gotten good rewiews in mags. Do not be stingy here!
[...]
Graphics card: YOu can actually go for older model, year 2012 even. If you have a recent motherboard and good Processor, even a decent older graphics card will do, and will be a big saving in your budget.
 
Memory: Do not overdo it. Too much memory can actually hamper your PC. Just few sticks will do, and they need not be the latest models.

I disagree with some of your points. It doesn't take a High-End motherboard to run games acceptably. A good motherboard for ~$100 or even less is good enough, though it depends on the model and the reviews. I purchased a MSI Z87-G43 for about 90€ in September and it works just fine. While it's true that the processor plays an important role in a PC, it isn't the most important part if you like to play videogames. Graphic-cards are more important in gaming, and 'go for an older model, year 2012 even' is honestly a terrible advice.

 

What model specifically? It makes a huge difference if you talk about, for example, a GT620 or a GTX670, so define 'decent'. The creator of this topic wants a gaming system, which means the best thing to do is going with a GPU of the latest generation. It doesn't need to be the highest possible model, but a GTX760 or a R9 280(x) would be a good choice for gaming on high to very high settings. That are just examples, though. It depends on the budget.

 

As for Memory, 8GB of RAM is enough for gaming, there is no need for more. Only 64-bit programs can utilize more than 2GB of system RAM, and there aren't many games that can do that yet. But, like so many things, that will change because of the next-gen consoles.

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Mista J
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#32

Posted 15 February 2014 - 05:09 PM Edited by DarthShinobi, 15 February 2014 - 05:10 PM.

installing a high end graphics card into a cheap motherboard is about as useful as installing a V8 engine to a morris mini.
 
A cheap motherboard simply cannot unleash all the potential power of a high end graphichs card...
 
One more thing about soundcard selection: If you play with headphones, you do not actually need a sound card. Many motherboards have integrated soundcard in them, with pretty decent sound.
 
You only really need a sound card if you use 5.1 speaker systems or somesuch...
 
P.S. Never listen to the so called PC gurus, when building a gaming PC. They usually talk complete rubbish!

I'm not saying to buy a $20 board. You just don't need a high end one. Just because a motherboard has "GAM1NG L337 SN1P3R" in the name, it doesn't mean you need it.

SingularSoul
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#33

Posted 15 February 2014 - 09:07 PM

Big thanks to everyone who contributed some VERY valuable information to this thread. 

After taking some of your points and doing some more research, I've officially decided to start putting money towards saving for the components I need to build my gaming PC. I also hope to sell my PS3 within a year, so that'l help me with buying a few extra goodies too. 

I look forward to becoming a fully-fledged PC gamer :)


OnceAgainYoungFitzpatrick
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#34

Posted 15 February 2014 - 09:15 PM

Big thanks to everyone who contributed some VERY valuable information to this thread. 

After taking some of your points and doing some more research, I've officially decided to start putting money towards saving for the components I need to build my gaming PC. I also hope to sell my PS3 within a year, so that'l help me with buying a few extra goodies too. 

I look forward to becoming a fully-fledged PC gamer :)

Terrible choice. You'll regret it. Xbox One > PC


UtricularEwe001
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#35

Posted 15 February 2014 - 09:20 PM

^ Not sure if serious or trolling
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FranklinDeRoosevelt
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#36

Posted 15 February 2014 - 09:27 PM

Of course he's serious, Microsoft are paying him for pleasure. He likes to swallow those sticky liquid and enjoy the sensation through his throat, and then developing herpes in his mouth.

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Fireman
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#37

Posted 15 February 2014 - 09:47 PM Edited by Fireman, 15 February 2014 - 09:48 PM.

Look up guides from tweakers or game magazines.

 

Gaming mags always have a section with "best buys of the Month" or something like that, to build your own desktop. Even with different price ranges.

i used a Dutch site to build mine, but I'm sure there are plenty of English sites as well.


Mista J
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#38

Posted 16 February 2014 - 12:12 AM

If you really want to understand your PC start going to tomshardware.com or on youtube Linustechtips is a really good channel. He also has a second channel called techquickie that has short videos on the function of certain parts.



How in the f*ck is the Xbox One better than a PC? So far it's biggest game is a frame rate mess, and the other is on PC.

SingularSoul
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#39

Posted 16 February 2014 - 10:23 PM

If you really want to understand your PC start going to tomshardware.com or on youtube Linustechtips is a really good channel. 

 

Been tuning in to both of these over the last 2 months or so. Thanks for the tip though :)


Misbegotten cad
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#40

Posted 18 February 2014 - 09:18 AM

Here is a good tip for beginners:

 

Go to a game store, and look up most recent, big budget PC games.

 

On the back of those games, you will find a list of recommended system requirements

 

there, you will find a list of recommended graphics cards for those games.

 

Now, if you buy a card from that list, you will make sure the graphics card will work well with all new games.

 

Now, reason I told you to keep away from PC gurus is this:

-They are very biased towards certain types and brands of hardware

-they tend to recommend esoteric types of hardware that require a masters decree in computer sciences to use.

-they prattle about overclocking even though to a regular gamer overclocking is pretty much useless...

 

Regular PC gamer does not need top notch or esoteric hardware. Regular joe needs hardware that is easy to install and use, and that will set up automatically once installed. PC gurus tend not to realise this, being a bit narrow minded individuals...


friendly luggage
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#41

Posted 18 February 2014 - 04:25 PM

Here is a good tip for beginners:

 

Go to a game store, and look up most recent, big budget PC games.

 

On the back of those games, you will find a list of recommended system requirements

 

there, you will find a list of recommended graphics cards for those games.

 

Now, if you buy a card from that list, you will make sure the graphics card will work well with all new games.

 

Now, reason I told you to keep away from PC gurus is this:

-They are very biased towards certain types and brands of hardware

-they tend to recommend esoteric types of hardware that require a masters decree in computer sciences to use.

-they prattle about overclocking even though to a regular gamer overclocking is pretty much useless...

 

Regular PC gamer does not need top notch or esoteric hardware. Regular joe needs hardware that is easy to install and use, and that will set up automatically once installed. PC gurus tend not to realise this, being a bit narrow minded individuals...

 

The recommended specs on the back of even new games can be out of date. Always build a gaming PC for a certain budget with the best components available at the time.

Tech chat regulars on this forum are fairly non biased. Many builds have been put together for people which contain both AMD and Intel. We don't recommend "esoteric types of hardware that require a masters decree in computer sciences to use", we're building gaming PCs here. It goes together pretty much the same and if you can follow instructions it's easy.

Overclocking is easily done with utilites that come with most midrange + graphics cards. CPU wise is simple these days too. It's not useless because you are getting more performance out of your computer.

 

You're right in that a normal gamer doesn't need a top of the range system, but they need something that is new and not two generations old because Ass Creed 3 will just about run on it. You say "Regular joe needs hardware that is easy to install and use, and that will set up automatically once installed" but most components are installed and setup the same way whether its a enthusiast level Intel i7 build or a budget AMD A6 mmo machine.


Mista J
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#42

Posted 18 February 2014 - 05:01 PM

Most game requirements are inflated too. CoD Ghosts recommends a 4GB video card, but you don't need it.

Watch Dogs recommends an i7 but no doubt you'd run just as good on an i5. Depends if it takes advantage of hyperthreading or not though.

Misbegotten cad
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#43

Posted 22 February 2014 - 09:29 AM

Personally I would get gaming LAPTOP rather than regular PC, if I was you.

 

For the following reasons:

 

1.Power consumption:

regular gaming PC:s need 500W power source to run these days. that's how much power they drink. Laptops take only fraction of that power to run.

 

2.Noise:

Noise generated by a regular PC is a real racket, especially if you are playing a game that requires acute hearing (stealth games, games with a lot of dialogue). And no, it does not help much to use headphones...

-Whereas Laptop barely makes a whisper as you play.

 

3.Installation:

Laptop comes with all drivers, and window, preistalled, so you can start playing right away!

 

4.Budget:

With gaming PC, you need to dish out for windows too, and usually get a monitor as well. This raises the budget to near 1000 euros. That money gets you two excellent gaming laptops!!!

 

4.Divorce:

When your missus decides to kick you out, laptop is easy to grab!

-But just you try to grab a regular PC with it's cables and mouses and keyboards, while your wife is screaming at you and peppering you with small household objects. Not gonna happen!!!

 

So, all in all, laptop is better. And remember, laptop comes with HDMI, so you can plug it to your 40 inch telly if you fancy a bigger picture.


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#44

Posted 22 February 2014 - 12:22 PM

Are you trying to make a habit out of giving bad advice? A gaming laptop with decent specs will cost two to three times as much as a desktop with similar or better performance, use basically the same amount of power, and all modern GPUs have HDMI out so that point is completely moot. As for your "installation" argument, if you're that lazy, just stick to console gaming.

I see now why you tried to recommend ignoring people with experience: it's clearly because you yourself have none and have no idea what you're talking about.
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Mista J
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#45

Posted 22 February 2014 - 03:32 PM

Gaming Laptops are heavy and hardly portable. :p Plus they run hot as hell.

Xcommunicated
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#46

Posted 22 February 2014 - 03:42 PM

Wow. So much fail. Not worth moving thread. Feel free to start another topic in the Tech forum.


Mista J
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#47

Posted 22 February 2014 - 03:45 PM

I hope you don't mean me. :<

yojc
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#48

Posted 22 February 2014 - 04:10 PM Edited by yojo2, 22 February 2014 - 04:10 PM.

1.Power consumption:
regular gaming PC:s need 500W power source to run these days. that's how much power they drink.

You went a bit overboard. For a PC to "drink" 500 watts it would have to be a top of the range rig, overclocked. Most of the regular gaming rigs wont consume more than 200-300W under load (which is again far more than a laptop needs, but still...)

Xcommunicated
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#49

Posted 23 February 2014 - 07:28 AM

I hope you don't mean me. :<

No, just the shoddy, misinformed advice peppered throughout this thread.

Oops, I forgot to lock this after posting. Oh well it's been moved now...

Anyways, when building a gaming pc, you need to sort out things like what resolution you intend to be playing at. If you have or plan to get a typical 1080p monitor and plan to run newer games at 1920x1080, then you can probably get by just fine with a $150 low-mid range gpu like the Geforce GTX 750 Ti, which is not only powerful, but extremely quiet and power efficient (it draws all its power from the PCIe slot).

Something I would highly recommend to anyone building a new pc these days is to go with a SSD for your system AND gaming drive. A good SSD can make a world of difference in responsiveness for an older pc as well. A lot of current SSDs can be found around the 0.50USD/GB price point these days.
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