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Netanyahu says Iranians can't wear jeans, #jeans is flooded with I

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Greenline
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#1

Posted 06 October 2013 - 04:00 PM Edited by Greenline, 06 October 2013 - 04:00 PM.

http://socialmedia.i...etanyahu-2.html Scroll down for English tweets.

 

 

 

in a lighter side to the Israel-Iran standoff over nuclear weapons, Iranians armed with nothing more than jeans and a camera are protesting Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu’s intimation that they are ruled by a cultic government that restricts not only their voting options but their sartorial choices as well.

 

One Iranian Twitter user, who had only bothered tweeting 152 times before today, dedicated his next 140 characters to Mr. Netanyahu:

 

Other tweets ranged from sassy to vindictive, but all seemed to send a clear retort: We don’t need you intervening on behalf of our freedom.

The #jeans protest came in response to a comment by Netanyahu last week in which he attempted to distinguish Iranian aspirations from the theocratic system of government that has prevailed in the Islamic Republic since 1979. The Supreme Leader is officially considered “God’s deputy on earth.”

“If they had a free go, are you kidding, they’d toss out this regime, they’d go in blue jeans,” said Netanyahu during his first-ever interview with BBC Persian. “I mean these people, the Iranian people, the majority of them are actually pro-Western. But they don’t have that. They’re governed not by Rouhani. They’re governed by Ayatollah Khamenei. He heads a cult. That cult is wild in its ambitions and its aggression.”

Netanyahu has just returned from Washington and New York, where he warned the US and the world of the dangers of accepting Iran's softer rhetoric without seeing any real change in its nuclear program. Some say the Israeli prime minister sees himself as taking on a Churchillian role of warning against appeasement, just as the formidable British leader did when faced by the Nazi regime. http://www.csmonitor...ab-at-Netanyahu


GTA_stu
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#2

Posted 06 October 2013 - 04:07 PM

I don't get it. It seems like the Iranians have the impression that Netanyahu was saying that Iranians aren't allowed to wear jeans. But clearly that's not what he was saying. 

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Shah Sam
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#3

Posted 06 October 2013 - 05:04 PM Edited by thebodies, 06 October 2013 - 05:04 PM.

Marg bar Amrika!

 

Spoiler


D- Ice
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#4

Posted 06 October 2013 - 06:42 PM Edited by D- Ice, 06 October 2013 - 07:14 PM.

OK, so what Netanyahu said has been misinterpreted by Iranians (probably thanks to state media), but the fact remains that Iran is;

1) Ruled by an overly oppressive, unrepresentative government.

2) Their clothing restrictions do not fairly represent what the Iranian people want.

 

If it was up to the Iranian people, they'll have an ultra-nationalist, secular (likely even anti-Islam) government, and people will be over-compensating clothing restrictions with 90% women wearing short-shorts and bras in winter.

But that's not the case in Iran. So ultimately, Netanyahu and Israel are right yet again in the stand-off.

 

It's sad to see the Iranians protesting against such a non-issue, rather than against the real threat to them and the world - their expansionist and oppressive government.


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Posted 06 October 2013 - 07:51 PM

They have Twitter??? Thought that was banned years ago. You know, when they shot all those people dead in the streets. NIce government they have over there with that new 'moderate' in charge.

Greenline
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#6

Posted 09 October 2013 - 03:11 AM Edited by Greenline, 09 October 2013 - 03:14 AM.

D-Ice: Pride takes precedence sometimes, especially when Iranians are labled as savage and backwards by other people. Another issue is the obvious stigma surrounding outside support when it comes to the Iranian government (see Mossadeq). A lot is going on, and the sentiment seems to be changing from anti-government, to anti-west. Especially with the sanctions (the root being the Iranian gov't, but blaming an outside force that can't have you hung is a lot easier) ravaging the economy, and leading to the death of this 15-year old boy and the suffering of many more due to lack of medication, not being allowed into STEM programs in European colleges and unis, and the production of low-grade domestic petrol, polluting the cities, leading to closure.

All of these were most likely intended, but instead of calling for an overthrow of the government, the people are becoming more and more anti-west.


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#7

Posted 10 October 2013 - 12:26 AM

D-Ice: Pride takes precedence sometimes, especially when Iranians are labled as savage and backwards by other people. Another issue is the obvious stigma surrounding outside support when it comes to the Iranian government (see Mossadeq). A lot is going on, and the sentiment seems to be changing from anti-government, to anti-west. Especially with the sanctions (the root being the Iranian gov't, but blaming an outside force that can't have you hung is a lot easier) ravaging the economy, and leading to the death of this 15-year old boy and the suffering of many more due to lack of medication, not being allowed into STEM programs in European colleges and unis, and the production of low-grade domestic petrol, polluting the cities, leading to closure.

All of these were most likely intended, but instead of calling for an overthrow of the government, the people are becoming more and more anti-west.

 

Sadly,I know about sanctions all too well, having lived under the UN sactions in Iraq. Sanctions weaken and harm the normal population of countries far more than the governments, as well as trun the populaton against those who declared the sanction - ironically strengthening the governments they are declared against.

 

Support for the Iranian government is largely ideological:

1) Religion, mostly for the rural Shia Persians, who form the majority of the Basij.

2) Some Iranians may view their country's expansionism into Arab countries as positive, and the closest modern equivalent to the Persian Empires of old.

 

However, overall, Western influence in Iran is a positive thing. When Mossadegh was overthrown, and the Shah installed, Iranians enjoyed great advances in culture, economy and standards of living. The country even enjoyed great relations with other Western-influenced Arab nations, like Saudi Arabia, Monarchist Iraq, Jordan and Egypt (which is where Shah Mohammed Reza Pahlavi is buried).

Most Iranians wish the Islamic Revolution never happened, and that the Pahlavis still ruled Iran. So I can't see what is wrong with a coup with Western help - even the worst Western puppet will be a massive improvemnt over the current situation.

 

Also, look at the difference between South Korea and North Korea. They were the exact same country, except the South became pro-West, the North anti-West.

 

If the current regime is overthrown, the only thing Iran will lose is the influence over puppets like Maliki of Iraq, Hizbollah of Lebanon, Assad of Syria, and various other Shia populations in the Arab world - none of these has really benefitted the Iranian people.

I am sure you can easily imagine all the things the Iranian people will gain if the Ayatollahs are overthrown.

It will also help the Arab countries by ending Iranian expansionism and influence against the West.

 

For everyone's sakes, I really wish the regime gets depose one way or another, sooner rather than later.


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#8

Posted 10 October 2013 - 03:34 AM Edited by Greenline, 10 October 2013 - 03:39 AM.

History shows them that since charters were being issued by Nasser al-Din Shah in the late 1800s, there has been a constant record of extortion and deceit from big Western corporations (AIOC being the big example). Perhaps with the newer examples they've changed being so open about it as the rhetoric of the Cold War became more complex and hidden (faster spread of info maybe?).

Should they be deposed? Yes. By westerners? No, if they want a stable, permanent government.

And are Iranians happy with the suffering of Arabs? No, any sensible Persian would tell you that the spread of the Caliphate did nothing but good to Iran and the world. Allowing Persia to be a host of this crossroads of translated, and self-learned, now-Arabic knowledge. Beautiful geometry, flowing like Bedouin tents, with magical and impossible geometric patters and symmetry. Maybe I'm just stoned.

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#9

Posted 11 October 2013 - 07:20 PM

Haha, it's been ages since the last time I was high.

Most Arabs also don't have any problem with Persians - in places with high Arab and Persian populations like Dubai, both cultures exist peacefully and simultaneously - and I hear most new births are from mixed marriages these days.

 

The way I personally view it is that history is history. It is important to learn from it, as it does repeat itself, however it has no direct bearing on people today.

None of us where ever involved in any ancient battles, and what we think our ancestors where doing back then is not our responsibility nor reflects upon our nature as individuals. Just like the choices our parents made before we were born - they neither reflect our nature nor can we feel guilt, shame or pride about.

 

Also, every civilisation has contributed both positively and negatively to humanity.

 

TC





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