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Silk Road, online black market for drugs, shut down by FBI with founde

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TheBlackProject
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#1

Posted 03 October 2013 - 01:22 AM Edited by TheBlackProject, 03 October 2013 - 01:27 AM.

For the users of the Silk Road, this is a sad day.

 

http://rt.com/usa/si...tcoin-shut-650/

 

I don't even want to post any further and post my opinion, but to put it in short words, this blows. All good things do come to an end someday.

 

Edit: Mods, please remove "with founder" from the title.

 

 

Authorities have arrested a man in San Francisco, California accused of operating an underground website that allowed users to purchase guns and drugs from around the world using encrypted, digital currency.

Ross William Ulbricht, a 29-year-old graduate of the University of Pennsylvania School of Materials Science and Engineering known by the online alias “Dread Pirate Roberts,” was arrested by the Federal Bureau of Investigation on Tuesday for his alleged involvement in the Silk Road online marketplace, according to court papers published this week.

The Silk Road website was shut down following Ulbricht's arrest on Tuesday. 

A sealed complaint dated September 27 was unearthed by security researcher Brian Krebs, in which Ulbricht is accused of narcotics trafficking conspiracy, computer hacking conspiracy, money laundering conspiracy and more.

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RoadRunner71
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#2

Posted 03 October 2013 - 01:55 AM

I find it correct. Drugs are bad, mkay?

El Diablo
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#3

Posted 03 October 2013 - 02:17 AM

oh look.

consenting adults buying and selling goods from one another in a peaceful and consensual manner.

 

let's shut it down.

 

government-sucks_c_740740.jpg


Chunkyman
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#4

Posted 03 October 2013 - 03:01 AM

I like this guy, shame he's going to be thrown into a cage for the next decade or two.

 

o3jn.jpg


Adler
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#5

Posted 03 October 2013 - 04:00 AM

Welp, I guess some other enterprising individual will have to pick up where he left off.


sivispacem
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#6

Posted 03 October 2013 - 06:51 AM

The Silk Road were complicit in trying to have Brian Krebs framed and arrested for heroin distribution. That's enough reason for them to be shut down in my opinion, quite aside from the rest of their activities.


Max
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#7

Posted 03 October 2013 - 07:27 AM

oh look.

consenting adults buying and selling goods from one another in a peaceful and consensual manner.

Ulbricht ordered and paid for the murder of a Canadian man who threatened to reveal the identities of thousands of Silk Road users. I don't consider that peaceful.


sivispacem
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#8

Posted 03 October 2013 - 10:44 AM

He paid for two assassinations actually, according to what I've read the first of these was to an undercover FBI agent who then faked this murder so as to continue the monitoring of Ulbricht. The second murder is also not thought to have actually taken place-nonetheless that's two counts of conspiracy to murder, at 25-to-life each.

ROCKSTAR MANIC
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#9

Posted 03 October 2013 - 10:54 PM

he made a lot of money. I guess the Tax invasion caught to him just like any other "3-bit-hit gangster"


Finn 7 five 11
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#10

Posted 03 October 2013 - 11:12 PM

oh look.
consenting adults buying and selling goods from one another in a peaceful and consensual manner.

Ulbricht ordered and paid for the murder of a Canadian man who threatened to reveal the identities of thousands of Silk Road users. I don't consider that peaceful.
Pretty hypocritical based on that picture posted above if Ulbricht wrote it.
"I disagree with use of force"
> Orders hits on multiple people. Sounds pretty deranged to me.

DarrinPA
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#11

Posted 04 October 2013 - 12:03 AM

@Finn4life That was my thoughts exactly. But the more you go through life, the more people you see become everything they ever hated. Sad really.

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El Diablo
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#12

Posted 04 October 2013 - 01:06 AM

Ulbricht ordered and paid for the murder of a Canadian man who threatened to reveal the identities of thousands of Silk Road users. I don't consider that peaceful.

 

 

He paid for two assassinations actually

 

guys I never said anything about Ross Ulbricht.

I was referring to the Silk Road marketplace.

 

at the risk of sounding crass, it really is a marvelous experiment in free-market economics.

yeah unfortunately the guy who runs it ended up with a bit of a power trip. sh*t happens...


sivispacem
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#13

Posted 04 October 2013 - 07:09 AM

at the risk of sounding crass, it really is a marvelous experiment in free-market economics.

yeah unfortunately the guy who runs it ended up with a bit of a power trip. sh*t happens...

 

 

Which is a pretty good metaphor for what happens when entirely free market economic conditions exist without any kind of societal oversight, surely?

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NAME CHANGE LOL
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#14

Posted 04 October 2013 - 07:17 AM

He was the one who knocks.


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#15

Posted 04 October 2013 - 08:29 AM

An example of why the Governments need to read emails and monitor forums.

 

government_spying1_0.jpg


Tycek
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#16

Posted 04 October 2013 - 08:38 AM

And listen to phone calls, read every SMS and mount cameras in every room in the whole world. 


gtamad8
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#17

Posted 04 October 2013 - 08:51 AM

I can see why they acted on the guns but were the drugs neccessary? It's not like they were being sold to 10 year olds or anything


sivispacem
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#18

Posted 04 October 2013 - 08:58 AM

How do you know? What about the fact the site was involved in criminal conspiracies like framing an investigative reporter for heroin dealing, two attempted murders and likely by proxy the funding of violent organised crime?

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#19

Posted 04 October 2013 - 12:29 PM

How do you know? What about the fact the site was involved in criminal conspiracies like framing an investigative reporter for heroin dealing, two attempted murders and likely by proxy the funding of violent organised crime?

 

The site wasn't responsible, a site can't go out and call hits on folks. Its management on the other hand can, it was the owner that allegedly went of the deep-end. If the site was run properly we wouldn't be reading this story.


sivispacem
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#20

Posted 04 October 2013 - 01:33 PM

A marketplace designed specifically for organised criminals to distribute illegal narcotics is the very definition of responsible. By your logic the Mafia banks weren't culpable for the actions of the Mafia. As for the question of whether the site can be held responsible for the murder plots, of course not directly but certainly indirectly. It was both the cause of, and a tool in, conspiracy to commit murder.

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#21

Posted 04 October 2013 - 04:16 PM

Which is a pretty good metaphor for what happens when entirely free market economic conditions exist without any kind of societal oversight, surely?

Not disagreeing, but this kind of goes both ways. We can also say that Silk Road is the example of what happens when the social oversight oversteps the bounds of necessary and starts to police morality.

We really need to get over this whole, "This is bad, so it is illegal," kind of attitude. This is too subjective. What the legal system should do is maximize freedom. This is still somewhat subjective, but much easier to agree on. Anti-monopoly laws are necessary, because while they restrict some of the freedoms of a business, they protect significantly more freedoms. On the other hand, the drug war has been taking away more freedoms than protecting. I'm not going to say that we should outright legalize everything, but significant reforms are needed. It just can't be allowed to go on like this.

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#22

Posted 04 October 2013 - 05:23 PM

oh look.

consenting adults buying and selling goods from one another in a peaceful and consensual manner.

 

let's shut it down.

 

What? The dude was soliciting a murder, and has admitted to doing so before. Not only that, but he strongarmed scammers and trolls with violence. That's peaceful to you?


El Diablo
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#23

Posted 04 October 2013 - 05:49 PM Edited by El_Diablo, 04 October 2013 - 05:51 PM.

Which is a pretty good metaphor for what happens when entirely free market economic conditions exist without any kind of societal oversight, surely?

 

it could be, certainly.

but I disagree that it has to be.

 

the personal issues that befell Mr. Ulbricht weren't necessarily rooted in the marketplace itself.

 

What? The dude was soliciting a murder, and has admitted to doing so before. Not only that, but he strongarmed scammers and trolls with violence. That's peaceful to you?

 

yeah... please read the whole thread before replying.

I already made it clear; I'm not talking about Ulbricht himself. I'm talking about the marketplace he created.

 

thanks.


Moonshield
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#24

Posted 04 October 2013 - 06:17 PM

And please read the subtext - the alleged founder is being charged because he was power-tripping and using violence (or threats of) - the way he operated the marketplace wasn't peaceful at all. They're one in the same in this instance. That's what got him collared. But I guess that's a pretty good illustration of a "free market" without oversight, as sivi stated earlier.

 

That's not to say it's always like that, but you're talking in bullsh*t hypotheticals.


El Diablo
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#25

Posted 04 October 2013 - 06:30 PM

And please read the subtext - the alleged founder is being charged because he was power-tripping and using violence (or threats of) - the way he operated the marketplace wasn't peaceful at all. They're one in the same in this instance. That's what got him collared. But I guess that's a pretty good illustration of a "free market" without oversight, as sivi stated earlier.

 

That's not to say it's always like that, but you're talking in bullsh*t hypotheticals.

 

there's no "subtext" until you insert it.

 

my original point stands.

the community itself - The Silk Road - was a peaceful exchange of goods by peaceful people.
 

I have nothing to say about Mr. Ulbricht himself.


sivispacem
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#26

Posted 04 October 2013 - 09:57 PM

Right, because The Silk Road didn't fund violent and organised crime, didn't have a section supplying illegal weapons, wasn't a marketplace for identity theft and financial fraud and didn't contain adverts for targeted robbery, exploitation and murder

El Diablo
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#27

Posted 04 October 2013 - 10:24 PM Edited by El_Diablo, 04 October 2013 - 10:24 PM.

you weren't born yesterday, were you? ;)

 

murder and theft are going to exist wherever there are human beings and money.

at least for the foreseeable future.

 

as for the rest? unfortunately it's just circumstantial given the apparent vacuum of modern society (relatively unanimous global standards regarding drug policy). the "crime" wouldn't be "organized" (it wouldn't even be crime, for that matter) and the weapons wouldn't be illegal if the rest of society had its priorities in order. we both know that the majority of the economy on Silk Road was supported by the drugs... none of which should be illegal to begin with. the crime only becomes organized when world governments hand the entire marketplace for drugs over to criminal enterprises. you don't need me to tell you this, Sivis.

 

the anonymous exchange of firearms was the only aspect of the experiment that I was ever opposed to. and to be fair, Silk Road had shut down their firearm marketplace due to a lack of demand. they stopped trading in weapons. as for the rest? the rest is happenstance. almost to be expected. what are you surprised about? I mean if you really want to, you can find murder-for-hire on Craigslist in a big city.

 

the original SR experiment was about the open exchange of otherwise illegal substances amongst consenting adults. legal drugs.

the community worked on that principle once a trusted core of sellers was established. they shared their knowledge and tips about safety and security with enthusiasm. my only point is that it would be nice to see real society adopt this kind of marketplace attitude for the real world drug trade instead of continuing with the contemporary approach.

 

the point was made in passing more than anything.

ugh. I really didn't intend for this to turn into a debate anymore than I wanted this to be an arraignment of mankind or a character assassination of Mr. Ulbricht. because I couldn't give 2 sh*ts about him. I was only ever speaking to the concept of his economic experiment.


Mr.Scratch
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#28

Posted 04 October 2013 - 10:52 PM

Bustas.

MI0002516580.jpg?partner=allrovi.com


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#29

Posted 05 October 2013 - 03:26 AM Edited by mr_ed, 05 October 2013 - 03:30 AM.

The guy hasn't even stepped inside a court room and people are already branding him as guilty of murder. Let him stand trial first then pass judgement. Seems the only information were getting is being spoon fed by the agencies prosecuting him, and they have good motive to destroy his character before this hits the court room.

sivispacem
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#30

Posted 05 October 2013 - 06:28 AM

No one is claiming he's guilty of murder. He's been indicted for soliciting and paying for an assassination from and undercover agent which is about as damning an indictment I can think of. There's nothing to contradict what's being said by the police, federal agencies, external observers in the know ect ect so I really don't think it's reasonable to allege a character assassination without some evidence to support that allegation. I mean if you want to present an argument about how all the charges are bogus and the indictment bunk then be my guest..




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