Quantcast

Jump to content

» «
Photo

Anyone who is a professional web designer.

6 replies to this topic
Diggdydog
  • Diggdydog

    Trick

  • Angels of Death MC
  • Joined: 26 Mar 2008

#1

Posted 07 February 2013 - 03:57 PM

I'm really not sure if this should be posted here or Gen. Chat, but I figured the largest proportion of web designers is here.


Right, so basically, I've been applying for various Web Design apprenticeships only to get turned down because of my lack of coding experience. It seems like I'm graphically capable (photoshop), but I'm just not experienced enough with code. See, I thought that apprenticeships were the entry level, where you actually pick up the skills and learn so you can enter a career after the one year course. Apparently I was mistaken.

All the companies around where I live (North Yorkshire, UK) all seem to want people who can start designing websites from day 1, something which I thought would apply to a Junior Web Developer. So now I'm at a bit of a loss. I dunno whether I should skip the apprenticeship, and just learn on my own for a year or two, then apply for Junior Web Developer roles. Or if I should self learn for a year or two, then apply for an apprenticeship (which I'm not sure i could afford as they wouldn't pay enough to support me living away from parents house). I'm only 17 at the moment, so obviously I've got plenty of years to still break into the field, but I'd much rather start sooner rather than later.

So how did you all get into Web Developing? Any tips you could share?



Thanks,

OzzySM12
  • OzzySM12

    Hmm...

  • Members
  • Joined: 07 Nov 2004

#2

Posted 10 February 2013 - 03:22 PM

If you are only 17, go to college/university. These companies need to make money so need to hire people who are capable of doing something from day 1.

Yeah you can buy books and start learning yourself, but if you are serious about getting into this as a career then get to college or uni and do it right.

I am self taught and it ain't easy getting work. Despite an extensive portfolio and bits of my code being used in major open source projects, the fresh faced kids from uni with a bit of paper to say they have sat and listened to someone tell them about coding for years always get the job.

You can either spend 4 years studying at uni (and quite frankly having the f*cking time of your life tounge.gif ), or spend 4 years working for minimum wage at a start-up company waiting for it to turn a profit.

Diggdydog
  • Diggdydog

    Trick

  • Angels of Death MC
  • Joined: 26 Mar 2008

#3

Posted 11 February 2013 - 12:11 AM

You serious, man? Almost every single Job opening I've seen, it's all about experience and portfolio. I think it's roughly 1/15 openings have the requirement of graduate level.

Still, if all also fails I probably will have to go down this route. Don't really want to though, I'd much rather be working as odd as it sounds.

nightwalker83
  • nightwalker83

    Don't mind me

  • Members
  • Joined: 10 Oct 2004

#4

Posted 11 February 2013 - 04:48 AM

I'm a professional web designer if you just forget about the design part.

-Ryder-
  • -Ryder-

    You Pushed Me Away...

  • BUSTED!
  • Joined: 11 Feb 2013

#5

Posted 11 February 2013 - 03:08 PM

What kind of Coding language where you looking to learn?

Diggdydog
  • Diggdydog

    Trick

  • Angels of Death MC
  • Joined: 26 Mar 2008

#6

Posted 11 February 2013 - 03:19 PM

Currently I'm in the process of learning HTML and CSS. Turns out that's considerably easier than I thought, so I should be alright with that. The interviews I've been to all request different things, but it seems like coding that is used in Content Management websites are what they are generally after. Jquery seems like something they expects I should know. Pretty much, the more I can learn the better.

OzzySM12
  • OzzySM12

    Hmm...

  • Members
  • Joined: 07 Nov 2004

#7

Posted 11 February 2013 - 06:27 PM

QUOTE (Diggdydog @ Monday, Feb 11 2013, 15:19)
Currently I'm in the process of learning HTML and CSS. Turns out that's considerably easier than I thought, so I should be alright with that. The interviews I've been to all request different things, but it seems like coding that is used in Content Management websites are what they are generally after. Jquery seems like something they expects I should know. Pretty much, the more I can learn the better.

If this is you just learning HTML & CSS then as I said before, go to uni.

Learning by yourself, you are going to have to get to grips with;

  • HTML (4 and 5, as some companies want maximum compatibility where as some want to be on the bleeding edge)
  • CSS (2 & 3 for the same reasons as above)
  • JavaScript
  • JQuery

Now for your server side coding you will need to be at least familiar with a few of the following;

  • PHP
  • Python
  • Perl
  • Ruby
  • ASP
  • Java
  • ... the list goes on.

As well as server side coding, you will need to know how to communicate with databases using SQL. To add to the fun not all databases are identical so you need to get some experience working with MySQL, MSSQL, etc...
Then once you learn all that you'll get a job where after a few months, your boss will decided he wants something done in Flash tounge.gif .

In my job I use HTML 4, CSS 2, JavaScript & JQuery, PHP and MySQL on a daily basis, but have had to convert scripts from Python or Perl to PHP as well.

If you went to uni, you will be able to get a job with a much bigger company where you will have a specific area to work on.

QUOTE (Diggdydog @ Monday, Feb 11 2013, 00:11)
You serious, man? Almost every single Job opening I've seen, it's all about experience and portfolio. I think it's roughly 1/15 openings have the requirement of graduate level.

Still, if all also fails I probably will have to go down this route. Don't really want to though, I'd much rather be working as odd as it sounds.

Every job may say they want a portfolio and experience (which you don't actually have any of) but remember, if someone has the same (or a bit less) quality portfolio and experience as you but has that bit of paper as well, then 9 times out of 10 they will get the job.

You will get into a job faster by going to uni, as it is going to take a hell of a time for you to get up to scratch with everything and get some experience.




1 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 1 guests, 0 anonymous users