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Forza Motorsport 5

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East_On_Bimmer_St
  • East_On_Bimmer_St

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#271

Posted 11 February 2015 - 07:06 PM

 

 

 

FM5 is really great, but if you don't know much about tuning, then you're f*cked, whereas in FH2 it's a little more forgiving. That being said, buying tunes doesn't work out for me, I like the fact that I have to put a lot of time into my cars to get the best results, separating the amateurs from the pros. I just need to get better at it.

It's actually quite simple once you get a good grasp on what your doing isn't it.

 

For me the most confusing things were the differential, gearing and damping (bump and rebound stiffness) but once I understood what they all meant I wondered how they ever confused me in the first place (keep in mind this was back in the days of Forza 3 so the basic tuning guideline may have changed).

 

I'm starting to get the hang of it to an extent. I can tune and upgrade a car to a point where it's average, one of the hardest things for me to get is handling where the car gets a decent launch and can exit a corner properly with AWD. I had AWD on a near-perfect Lamborghini Gallardo, and I say near-perfect because I had to brake so much and turn so sharply, that I had no speed exiting the turn and ended up losing positions.

 

Some cars just require good driving, like the Ford Falcon FG. Others, like the Mercedes 190E only seem to be able to either have speed or handling, where I'm getting beaten on every straight.

 

Maybe someday soon we can play together and you can give me some tips.

 

The hardest thing for me is damping since I can never get it on par with the suspension and diff settings.

 

It really comes down to how the car comes from the factory. If it's a heavy car with lots of torque or a lighter car with less torque, if it's got better or worse lateral G's and if the weight is distributed evenly or unevenly. I normally tend to go for the medium sized sports cars like the Skyline, Supra and NSX since I feel that they're easy to tune while being able to stay competitive in S class lobbies and higher. I just can't drive the Falcon, too much torque, keep in mind that I know when to feather the throttle when I need to but when I drive the Falcon I just feel that it has too much torque and not enough oversteer.

 

I would like to, I really would but I tend not to play online with people from forum sites, it's nothing personal I've just never been the type of person that plays online with people that I only know through websites.

 

For the record there is still something I don't get about differentials so I'm actually about to post a new topic (spam I know :() questioning how the Decel setting works in the game since I've been totally mindf*cked by the way Turn 10 explained it.

 

Trust me I know about playing with people online. I stopped doing that and only keep people I know in real life on my friends list. The only thing is that it's so hard to find lobbies in FM5 that aren't annoying kid ridden and dirty racers. I just want to join a club that does actual, precision racing with a good number of laps, and can actually fit my schedule. 

 

That's why I barely play because playing offline gets stale with the same drivatars and events and dickhead people yelling over the mic make me turn the console off.


BigJoe_1
  • BigJoe_1

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#272

Posted 11 February 2015 - 07:19 PM

 

 

 

 

FM5 is really great, but if you don't know much about tuning, then you're f*cked, whereas in FH2 it's a little more forgiving. That being said, buying tunes doesn't work out for me, I like the fact that I have to put a lot of time into my cars to get the best results, separating the amateurs from the pros. I just need to get better at it.

It's actually quite simple once you get a good grasp on what your doing isn't it.

 

For me the most confusing things were the differential, gearing and damping (bump and rebound stiffness) but once I understood what they all meant I wondered how they ever confused me in the first place (keep in mind this was back in the days of Forza 3 so the basic tuning guideline may have changed).

 

I'm starting to get the hang of it to an extent. I can tune and upgrade a car to a point where it's average, one of the hardest things for me to get is handling where the car gets a decent launch and can exit a corner properly with AWD. I had AWD on a near-perfect Lamborghini Gallardo, and I say near-perfect because I had to brake so much and turn so sharply, that I had no speed exiting the turn and ended up losing positions.

 

Some cars just require good driving, like the Ford Falcon FG. Others, like the Mercedes 190E only seem to be able to either have speed or handling, where I'm getting beaten on every straight.

 

Maybe someday soon we can play together and you can give me some tips.

 

The hardest thing for me is damping since I can never get it on par with the suspension and diff settings.

 

It really comes down to how the car comes from the factory. If it's a heavy car with lots of torque or a lighter car with less torque, if it's got better or worse lateral G's and if the weight is distributed evenly or unevenly. I normally tend to go for the medium sized sports cars like the Skyline, Supra and NSX since I feel that they're easy to tune while being able to stay competitive in S class lobbies and higher. I just can't drive the Falcon, too much torque, keep in mind that I know when to feather the throttle when I need to but when I drive the Falcon I just feel that it has too much torque and not enough oversteer.

 

I would like to, I really would but I tend not to play online with people from forum sites, it's nothing personal I've just never been the type of person that plays online with people that I only know through websites.

 

For the record there is still something I don't get about differentials so I'm actually about to post a new topic (spam I know :() questioning how the Decel setting works in the game since I've been totally mindf*cked by the way Turn 10 explained it.

 

Trust me I know about playing with people online. I stopped doing that and only keep people I know in real life on my friends list. The only thing is that it's so hard to find lobbies in FM5 that aren't annoying kid ridden and dirty racers. I just want to join a club that does actual, precision racing with a good number of laps, and can actually fit my schedule. 

 

That's why I barely play because playing offline gets stale with the same drivatars and events and dickhead people yelling over the mic make me turn the console off.

You can say that again. Now when I say this the last thing I want to come off as is a stereotypical Scot that hates the English but whenever I play Forza 5 9 times out of 10 I end up in lobbies that have about 3-4 English guys/kids in them that talk on game chat about the most annoying sh*t and it's so hard to concentrate on driving that I just leave after 2 races.

 

Kids in general come mind as well though. This one time in Forza 4 I was on Catalunya and this kid tried to slalom the last few corners, failed and completely ruined the race for about 4 other players.


BigJoe_1
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#273

Posted 11 February 2015 - 10:53 PM

Since I was pointed back to this thread by a MOD can someone tell me how the Decel setting on 2-way (fully adjustable) differential.

 

How does the Decel setting work? I understand the Accel setting enough to be able to tune it but not enough to understand how the diff actually functions during acceleration, in other words the most I know is that increasing Accel increases oversteer by locking it to a preset point quicker, therefore making the difference in rotational speed smaller.

 

The thing I am comepletely clueless about though is the Decel setting and I'm positive that it's my terrible knowledge of this part that is screwing up my setups (AWD in particular).

 

What does tuning the decel setting actually make the car do beyond behave differently in the turns, this is what is literally making my brain hurt :lol:.

 

I tried decreasing the deceleration setting on my RWD 2 way diff and it resulted in oversteer which made me think "doesn't an open diff on a RWD result in understeer since equal rotational force means that the wheels can rotate at different speeds which on RWD means that the rear isn't getting 'pushed' as much?"

 

Could someone explain to me why this is?

 

Also correct me if I'm wrong about the Accel setting, I don't want that to be wrong too?


Argonaut
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#274

Posted 11 February 2015 - 11:20 PM Edited by Argonaut, 11 February 2015 - 11:22 PM.

 

Since I was pointed back to this thread by a MOD can someone tell me how the Decel setting on 2-way (fully adjustable) differential.

 

How does the Decel setting work? I understand the Accel setting enough to be able to tune it but not enough to understand how the diff actually functions during acceleration, in other words the most I know is that increasing Accel increases oversteer by locking it to a preset point quicker, therefore making the difference in rotational speed smaller.

 

The thing I am comepletely clueless about though is the Decel setting and I'm positive that it's my terrible knowledge of this part that is screwing up my setups (AWD in particular).

 

What does tuning the decel setting actually make the car do beyond behave differently in the turns, this is what is literally making my brain hurt :lol:.

 

I tried decreasing the deceleration setting on my RWD 2 way diff and it resulted in oversteer which made me think "doesn't an open diff on a RWD result in understeer since equal rotational force means that the wheels can rotate at different speeds which on RWD means that the rear isn't getting 'pushed' as much?"

 

Could someone explain to me why this is?

 

Also correct me if I'm wrong about the Accel setting, I don't want that to be wrong too?

 

 

Don't know if what I'll say will be 100% accurate, but here goes.

 

The decel setting is how easily the diff will lock when the throttle is completely off, and vice versa the accel setting is how easily the differential will lock when throttle is being used. On Forza, increasing the sliders on accel will increase the sensitivity of how quickly the differential will lock, so less throttle usage is needed to have the differential lock. repetition much

 

In brief, an open Differential for a RWD car allows the two rear wheels to spin at different speeds to cover the same distance- say if you were turning left, the inner wheel (in relation to the corner) has less distance to travel than the outer wheel, therefore for them to both cover the same distance the outer wheel which is further away will have to spin faster than it and an Open differential allows them todo so. In your case, you have a 2-Way adjustable Limited-Slip diff on your car- this will basically lock the diff mechanism which allows the two wheels to travel at different speeds meaning that both wheels will now travel at the same speed- meaning that the outer wheel cannot cover the distance it needs to and begins to slide accordingly. Moving the sliders to the right will increase the sensitivity of this happening under accel/decel which will mean of course your car will slide about easier with them on full, but it's important to strike a balance with stability aswell; for example, if you were going downhill on Fujimi Kaido with your decel setting maxxed out, it would be especially hard to control on steep sections where you need to lift of the throttle entirely and coast to actually drive the course because when doing so your car would still slide about thanks to the diff being extremely prone to locking under decel.


BigJoe_1
  • BigJoe_1

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#275

Posted 12 February 2015 - 12:05 AM Edited by BigJoe_1, 12 February 2015 - 12:08 AM.

 

 

Since I was pointed back to this thread by a MOD can someone tell me how the Decel setting on 2-way (fully adjustable) differential.

 

How does the Decel setting work? I understand the Accel setting enough to be able to tune it but not enough to understand how the diff actually functions during acceleration, in other words the most I know is that increasing Accel increases oversteer by locking it to a preset point quicker, therefore making the difference in rotational speed smaller.

 

The thing I am comepletely clueless about though is the Decel setting and I'm positive that it's my terrible knowledge of this part that is screwing up my setups (AWD in particular).

 

What does tuning the decel setting actually make the car do beyond behave differently in the turns, this is what is literally making my brain hurt :lol:.

 

I tried decreasing the deceleration setting on my RWD 2 way diff and it resulted in oversteer which made me think "doesn't an open diff on a RWD result in understeer since equal rotational force means that the wheels can rotate at different speeds which on RWD means that the rear isn't getting 'pushed' as much?"

 

Could someone explain to me why this is?

 

Also correct me if I'm wrong about the Accel setting, I don't want that to be wrong too?

 

 

Don't know if what I'll say will be 100% accurate, but here goes.

 

The decel setting is how easily the diff will lock when the throttle is completely off, and vice versa the accel setting is how easily the differential will lock when throttle is being used. On Forza, increasing the sliders on accel will increase the sensitivity of how quickly the differential will lock, so less throttle usage is needed to have the differential lock. repetition much

 

In brief, an open Differential for a RWD car allows the two rear wheels to spin at different speeds to cover the same distance- say if you were turning left, the inner wheel (in relation to the corner) has less distance to travel than the outer wheel, therefore for them to both cover the same distance the outer wheel which is further away will have to spin faster than it and an Open differential allows them todo so. In your case, you have a 2-Way adjustable Limited-Slip diff on your car- this will basically lock the diff mechanism which allows the two wheels to travel at different speeds meaning that both wheels will now travel at the same speed- meaning that the outer wheel cannot cover the distance it needs to and begins to slide accordingly. Moving the sliders to the right will increase the sensitivity of this happening under accel/decel which will mean of course your car will slide about easier with them on full, but it's important to strike a balance with stability aswell; for example, if you were going downhill on Fujimi Kaido with your decel setting maxxed out, it would be especially hard to control on steep sections where you need to lift of the throttle entirely and coast to actually drive the course because when doing so your car would still slide about thanks to the diff being extremely prone to locking under decel.

 

I understand completely what your saying, I really do.

 

A locked diff means that both wheels are travelling at the same speed therefore the outer tire must be dragged to actually complete the turn while an open diff means that they can travel at different speeds which in this case allows the outer wheel to easily coast through the turn.

 

The thing I don't get is, on a rear diff how come a maxed accel causes oversteer when coming out of a corner but a locked decel setting causes understeer when entering a corner. Shouldn't a maxed decel setting cause oversteer the same way a maxed accel setting does?


BigJoe_1
  • BigJoe_1

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#276

Posted 14 February 2015 - 12:48 AM

BTW I now understand the differentials really clearly, I confused myself when the idea that the accel and decel values are inverted or reversed when tuning the front compared to the rear popped into my head ;panic:. This thought was quickly forgotten when I remembered that the inside tire of the front section travels less than the outer, the same way the inside tire on the rear does the same.

 

Now for my other question. How do you guys go about tuning your AWD cars to turn the way you would like them to, ie oversteer into the corners (quite a bit) more easily?

 

On Laguna Seca I can't get my Skyline to turn into the double spex with enough momentum to power out as quickly as I need to. In short I either go in slowly (slower than everyone else, note they still exit the turn with enough understeer to keep their cars straight) and power out after everyone else or go in with a bit more momentum and end up going off the track when I power out.


East_On_Bimmer_St
  • East_On_Bimmer_St

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#277

Posted 17 February 2015 - 02:44 AM

I'll be getting on shortly for anyone that wants to play. My GT is Gagemb9918




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