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Americans and manual gearbox.

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Michaś
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#121

Posted 01 January 2013 - 04:21 PM

I'll disagree. It's quite jerky in town. I prefer BMWs new DCT transmission, since it's ACTUALLY DECENT around town.

The best automatic for city by far is in an Audi A8. Smooth gear changes, quick response...

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#122

Posted 01 January 2013 - 06:37 PM

The jerkiness with DSG boxes is not something I've ever experienced. I think it was an issue with earlier cars but something that got fixed (or at least remedied) with a software update. They do require a slightly different style of driving to other sequential/clutchless boxes, predominantly as they don't "like" full-bore changes, and seem much smoother if you ease off a little as you change. My issues with the DSG boxes is the quality of the automatic mode, and the fact that up until recently they didn't hold torque very well and tended to let go internally once you hit around 430 lb ft.

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#123

Posted 02 January 2013 - 09:43 AM

Almost had an early '90s Civic back into me at a stoplight last night, and it wasn't even on a hill. He coasted backwards for probably 6 feet before going forward. If you have a manual, learn how to use it correctly...

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#124

Posted 02 January 2013 - 05:24 PM

QUOTE (Carlover325 @ Wednesday, Jan 2 2013, 04:43)
Almost had an early '90s Civic back into me at a stoplight last night, and it wasn't even on a hill. He coasted backwards for probably 6 feet before going forward. If you have a manual, learn how to use it correctly...

I've noticed people with autos usually do get right up on your ass. Are you sure you weren't just really close to the guy?

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#125

Posted 03 January 2013 - 03:32 AM

I wasn't close. I stop to where I can still see the rear tires of the car in frront of me. I do this in case the vehicle in front is a manual. I sometimes see them coast backward a couple feet. But by the time he started going forward, I could only see the top of the trunk.

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#126

Posted 04 June 2013 - 02:17 AM

QUOTE (epoxi @ Monday, Apr 2 2012, 11:46)
That's true. Here you would get stopped and fined instantly if the police every saw you eating or texting on your phone, whereas when I was in the US, I looked into other people's cars on the highway and 90% of them were eating, talking on the phone or even watching TV. It is just a completely different culture, and the US can afford to do it safely because everyone drives on wide, straight roads.

I have literally seen people watching YouTube videos on their phone while going 75 down the freeway suicidal.gif I have never even come close to touching my phone while driving and I don't understand how people can text and drive. It's insane and pure recklessness. One time I was I a car and the driver pulled out his phone to text and the guy sitting next to him grabbed the wheel. We were going about 95 down the car pool lane on a freeway.....

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#127

Posted 11 November 2013 - 07:03 AM

My dad said that it is best to learn to drive in a car with manual trans and no power braking or and no power steering.


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#128

Posted 11 November 2013 - 07:30 PM

Maybe it's just me but I get satisfaction from changing gears, the whole process of sinking the clutch down and smoothly slotting the gear into place is what I consider as fun while I'm driving, changing gears is the heart of driving, being in total control.

 

When you drive an automatic you can't control the revs as you can in a manual car, it's part of driving! If you've only learned on automatic and just that, you're missing out! If you're doing long distances though, I can understand where the automatic comes in handy, plus if you've not adapted to using the clutch properly, you will get an aching foot where you're always balancing it above the clutch, it's a bad habit you need to get out of, but once you become experienced you know how to relax the clutch foot where possible.

 

But I've learned something new today! American's drive automatics much more than manuals! Interesting. 


sivispacem
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#129

Posted 11 November 2013 - 09:59 PM

You know that basically every car in existence has a foot rest by the clutch so you don't need to hover like a retarded dragonfly, don't you?
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W3BB13
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#130

Posted 12 November 2013 - 02:19 AM

Ok, I was just wondering, why don't Americans learn to drive in MANUAL cars?
I had a friend come over from the States and... he didn't know how to use the manual tranny.
It's weird, are you not allowed to use manual or something lol.gif

LOL... have you ever even been to America?

 

I live in an area where almost everyone drives vehicles with manual transmissions. You have no idea what you're talking about.


MindCorrupt
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#131

Posted 12 November 2013 - 03:46 AM

You're not required to get a manual licence in Australia either. But I've never seen the point in people going the easy route where in the long run you may come to a situation where you need to drive a manual but can't because you never bothered to go for the licence. Each to their own I own I guess.

Prefer driving a manual, did some work for a mate in a delivery van around the city though. Would have given my left nut for an auto then though lol.

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#132

Posted 12 November 2013 - 05:14 AM Edited by uzi 9mm, 12 November 2013 - 05:16 AM.

You know that basically every car in existence has a foot rest by the clutch so you don't need to hover like a retarded dragonfly, don't you?

 

I know this already. But when you're just beginning to learn to drive some people make a habit of keeping their foot resting on the clutch or even depressing it slightly, my instructor told me when I passed my test in '06. And recently when I did a driving exam for a driving job the test guy said how he was pleased that I'm keeping away from the clutch since it's a common habit drivers get into, in fear of needing to quickly use the clutch.

 

But when you've been driving around for more than 10 hours a day, the clutch can start to feel heavy on the way home in traffic, those times an automatic would also come in handy. Every minute or 2 having to stop and start is a pain in the neck when you're tired and just want to go home.

 

Plus I've driven more than 10 different models of vehicles, you think I'd have missed something as obvious as a foot rest? It's just that learning to use it and stay away from the clutch can be a problem for some nervous drivers. I am an experienced driver so this doesn't affect me.


sivispacem
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#133

Posted 12 November 2013 - 07:57 AM

The best way of not picking up the habit of hovering unnecessarily over the clutch is to not start doing it in the first place.

 

Wow, 10 whole different vehicles. 


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#134

Posted 12 November 2013 - 10:42 AM

Ok, I was just wondering, why don't Americans learn to drive in MANUAL cars?

 

I know I'm late to the party but somehow I missed this whole thread.
without reading any of the other replies I can tell you that the answer to your question is utterly simple.

 

laziness and convenience.

in the US we're lazy and we place an inordinate amount of value on convenience and saving time.

 

automatic transmissions were MADE for Americans.

if you can teach a child how to drive a car in 30 seconds without having to worry about said child destroying your tranny then you've got a miracle on your hands. this is the land of fast food and cutting corners.


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#135

Posted 12 November 2013 - 02:10 PM

I come from the US and I cannot drive a car with a manual transmission. It is a complete disgrace and I am ashamed of myself. You really look like a total muppet when you go abroad and ask for a rental with an automatic.


uzi 9mm
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#136

Posted 12 November 2013 - 07:15 PM



The best way of not picking up the habit of hovering unnecessarily over the clutch is to not start doing it in the first place.

 

Wow, 10 whole different vehicles. 

 Obviously, it were as easy as that people wouldn't do it but it's easier said than done, it's a common bad driving habit.

 

Yes, 10 whole different ones. Wow? I wasn't trying to say anything special, just wanted to point it out since maybe you thought I didn't know about a foot rest, since you found the need to explain how most cars have one.


sivispacem
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#137

Posted 12 November 2013 - 08:15 PM

 



The best way of not picking up the habit of hovering unnecessarily over the clutch is to not start doing it in the first place.

 

Wow, 10 whole different vehicles. 

 

Obviously, it were as easy as that people wouldn't do it but it's easier said than done, it's a common bad driving habit.

 

 

Just because it's common doesn't make it acceptable. It's a product of poor driver training. There are plenty of common driving habits which are downright dangerous.

Not as bad as people who physically rest their foot on the clutch when driving, but still pretty silly.

 

The point I was making is that I know people who've driven for 20, 30, 40+ years who still keep to such habits. The number of vehicles you've driven is largely irrelevant and read like an attempt to sound "impressive", not that a figure so low would really pass muster around these parts at an attempt at willy-waving.


uzi 9mm
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#138

Posted 12 November 2013 - 08:46 PM

 

 



The best way of not picking up the habit of hovering unnecessarily over the clutch is to not start doing it in the first place.

 

Wow, 10 whole different vehicles. 

 

Obviously, it were as easy as that people wouldn't do it but it's easier said than done, it's a common bad driving habit.

 

 

Just because it's common doesn't make it acceptable. It's a product of poor driver training. There are plenty of common driving habits which are downright dangerous.

Not as bad as people who physically rest their foot on the clutch when driving, but still pretty silly.

 

The point I was making is that I know people who've driven for 20, 30, 40+ years who still keep to such habits. The number of vehicles you've driven is largely irrelevant and read like an attempt to sound "impressive", not that a figure so low would really pass muster around these parts at an attempt at willy-waving.

 

Ok I understand what you're saying, but I only said I've driven 10 different cars because you were explaining to me that all cars have a place to rest the clutch foot, so me saying I've driven 10 cars is to just let you know I know there's a place to rest your foot, not an attempt to show off.

 

It is common, but I know it's unacceptable, it's unsafe to keep to clutch even slightly depressed, it wastes petrol, affects your braking and gives your leg an ache. End of.


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#139

Posted 12 November 2013 - 09:48 PM

When driving in the city @ crawl speeds, i find my foot starts to ache. Am I doing something wrong or is that just how it is?


Mcquiz
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#140

Posted 12 November 2013 - 10:47 PM

 

You know that basically every car in existence has a foot rest by the clutch so you don't need to hover like a retarded dragonfly, don't you?

 

I know this already. But when you're just beginning to learn to drive some people make a habit of keeping their foot resting on the clutch or even depressing it slightly, my instructor told me when I passed my test in '06. And recently when I did a driving exam for a driving job the test guy said how he was pleased that I'm keeping away from the clutch since it's a common habit drivers get into, in fear of needing to quickly use the clutch.

 

But when you've been driving around for more than 10 hours a day, the clutch can start to feel heavy on the way home in traffic, those times an automatic would also come in handy. Every minute or 2 having to stop and start is a pain in the neck when you're tired and just want to go home.

 

Plus I've driven more than 10 different models of vehicles, you think I'd have missed something as obvious as a foot rest? It's just that learning to use it and stay away from the clutch can be a problem for some nervous drivers. I am an experienced driver so this doesn't affect me.

 

I have  a other kind of problem. My car (manual) doesn't have cruise control so after a longer stint (100+ km) my throttle foot starts to hurt. I still haven't found a way to find a position that makes driving long distances like that better.


W3BB13
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#141

Posted 13 November 2013 - 01:14 AM Edited by W3BB13, 13 November 2013 - 01:17 AM.

 

Ok, I was just wondering, why don't Americans learn to drive in MANUAL cars?

 

I know I'm late to the party but somehow I missed this whole thread.
without reading any of the other replies I can tell you that the answer to your question is utterly simple.

 

laziness and convenience.

in the US we're lazy and we place an inordinate amount of value on convenience and saving time.

 

Speak for yourself. You won't find anyone in northern Maine driving an automatic.


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#142

Posted 13 November 2013 - 05:06 AM Edited by uzi 9mm, 13 November 2013 - 05:12 AM.

 

 

You know that basically every car in existence has a foot rest by the clutch so you don't need to hover like a retarded dragonfly, don't you?

 

I know this already. But when you're just beginning to learn to drive some people make a habit of keeping their foot resting on the clutch or even depressing it slightly, my instructor told me when I passed my test in '06. And recently when I did a driving exam for a driving job the test guy said how he was pleased that I'm keeping away from the clutch since it's a common habit drivers get into, in fear of needing to quickly use the clutch.

 

But when you've been driving around for more than 10 hours a day, the clutch can start to feel heavy on the way home in traffic, those times an automatic would also come in handy. Every minute or 2 having to stop and start is a pain in the neck when you're tired and just want to go home.

 

Plus I've driven more than 10 different models of vehicles, you think I'd have missed something as obvious as a foot rest? It's just that learning to use it and stay away from the clutch can be a problem for some nervous drivers. I am an experienced driver so this doesn't affect me.

 

I have  a other kind of problem. My car (manual) doesn't have cruise control so after a longer stint (100+ km) my throttle foot starts to hurt. I still haven't found a way to find a position that makes driving long distances like that better.

 

 

I'd say the best solution to that is to take a break, like stop somewhere and rest for about 20 - 30 minutes, I also find that after you've been on a motorway for quite a long time you can get tired from accelerating, if you ain't got cruise control then taking a rest is the best option.

 

100km isn't too bad, anything over 200 miles is worthy of taking a break I reckon.


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#143

Posted 13 November 2013 - 05:45 AM

Speak for yourself. You won't find anyone in northern Maine driving an automatic.

yeah that's bullsh*t.

there's plenty of people in "northern Maine" who drive autos.

 

I don't speak for myself but what I said is true

most people in the US drive an auto for the sake of convenience.


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#144

Posted 17 November 2013 - 04:13 PM Edited by gtamann123, 17 November 2013 - 04:13 PM.

The only advantage I can think of that manual has over auto is the fun of it. Other than that it seems like a pretty sh*tty trade off. A whole bunch of extra work for real no benefit. Thats why hardly any Americans drive stick 


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#145

Posted 17 November 2013 - 04:49 PM

it's not just fun. it can also be practical especially in a country like the US where so few people understand how a manual works.

because a manual gearbox also has the advantage of being difficult to steal.

 

if some punk kid is going to jack your ride while its parked outside the stadium or whatever, they'll likely skip it once they see it's manual.


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#146

Posted 17 November 2013 - 07:15 PM Edited by sivispacem, 17 November 2013 - 07:18 PM.

All else being equal, manuals put more power down on the road, are more fuel efficient, faster plus of course infinitely more fun.
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#147

Posted 25 November 2013 - 03:01 AM

I've learned driving and mostly ever driven manual cars.

While I completely see where people are coming from when they say automatics are easier to drive, for me personally, I really struggled when I tried driving automatics - I actually find manuals easier to drive.

While I only driven automatics a couple of times, instructed by friends, I found the whole concept difficult to visualise - I find the manual system far more instinctual.

 

Another advantage is having seperate clutch controls to allow direct control over the extent to which the engine is engaged to the drive wheels.

 

I also prefer manuals as they allow you change gears whenever you like, instead of changing them automatically - I dread to drive a car that changes gears based on engine revs (I presume, please correct of wrong), which would resemble driving GTA cars following traffic laws.

 

Finally, with automatics, you are unable to select which specific gear your car's in. Even when you use the numbered gears (ie 1, 2, 3), there are at least two gear ratios placed together in each number, with the car automatically alternating between them.

 

 


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#148

Posted 25 November 2013 - 07:14 PM

I feel very out of control in an automatic car, the dependency on the brakes to decelerate is a bit unnerving.

 

I can't remember if they've been mentioned but some more (generalised) pros of a manual: cheaper to manufacture, cheaper to maintain, cheaper to fix, less wear on the brakes.

 

I can see why some people whose commute consists of a long straight road would prefer an automatic, but in Europe I would definitely want a manual. Cruise control is useful for long drives though (but even that is available in some manuals).


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#149

Posted 26 November 2013 - 04:47 AM

manual transmissions are just too much trouble. AT are easier for people to use. 

 

i enjoy MT but its not something everyone wants to learn. 


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#150

Posted 27 November 2013 - 08:54 AM

I learnt in a manual (as is customary in the UK) but I haven't so much as touched one except for the occasional rental when I don't get the upgrade I want. 





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