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[TUT] Spot Healing Brush Tutorial

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gamesguru
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#1

Posted 10 August 2010 - 02:28 PM Edited by gamesguru, 10 August 2010 - 02:38 PM.

user posted image
[Photoshop Tutorial]


I was originally going to include this on a website I'm working on. However that won't be for a while, and I felt like I should give back to the GFX community here. This is a simple but in-depth Photoshop tutorial for beginners and rookies. Have you ever seen those pictures where an object is then erased out of the picture, yet the part behind it remains, like a wall or backdrop? You’d think it would take years of experience and skill to do, but this couldn’t be any further from the truth. This can easily be done with the Spot Healing Brush Tool (the icon that looks like a plaster). In this example I will show you how to erase the logo from a Coca-Cola can. I took the following picture as it was the most detailed: image.

Choose the Spot Healing Brush Tool once you have your image:
user posted image


I used a 25pxl thick round brush and held the mouse and highlighted the small typography that spells ‘classic’. Note that if you highlight too many contrasting areas like the edge of the can, and logos above, you will end up getting a weird smudge effect. So only highlight what is necessary. You should get this result:

user posted image


Now use the same brush size to dig away at the ‘Wave’. Start from the small part in the middle. You don’t have to highlight the whole thing, especially as it touches the contrasting edges of the can, which will cause the whole process to be worthless. Keep digging away at the stripe both northwards and southwards. Don’t worry about blurs and smudges. Once you have the stripe as far as it will go to the edge, you start ‘erasing’ the blurs and smudges as much as you can using the Smudge Tool:

user posted image


Alternatively you can use the pen tool to select the general area you are working on (the can/Wave), hence you will avoid the contrasting areas at the edges of the can. If you find the Smudge Tool process easier, you will still need to get rid a few bits of the wave at the edges. Seeing as the can is a simple shape you can copy the left half of the top using the select tool and then Copying and flipping to the other side. Then use the the Spot Healing Brush Tool to smooth it out. The same goes for the bottom half. Use the Spot Healing Brush tool again, at maybe 140px and erase the main logo; now just make the can look a lot more natural and smooth. I added some vibrancy to the image, and ended up with this result:


user posted image

Wolf68k
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#2

Posted 10 August 2010 - 02:40 PM

It made the can more red? It shouldn't have

gamesguru
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#3

Posted 10 August 2010 - 02:41 PM

I said at the end, I added more vibrancy [CTRL+M]. That was just an addition I made.

M|chael
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#4

Posted 10 August 2010 - 03:10 PM

Not bad, ..
Ive not yet made the full switch from Fireworks to Photoshop, but things like this are slowly persuading me to do so
Under normal circumstances, it would require a lot of cutting a pasting to achieve a similar effect, and it'd probably take ages too.
Nice result, Kudos ..
(the vibrancy was a bit much though IMO) smile.gif

gamesguru
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#5

Posted 10 August 2010 - 03:20 PM

Yeah, I realise that now. When I made the tutorial a while back, my Laptop's screen back-light was off, and it makes the colours very dull. Hence why I over-saturated the final result.

Thanks for the feedback M|chael. smile.gif

Zook
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#6

Posted 13 August 2010 - 09:21 PM Edited by manbearpigy, 14 August 2010 - 12:06 AM.

Nice tutorial thanks



user posted image

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Blizzard14
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#7

Posted 15 August 2010 - 02:13 AM

Hah, whenever I wanted to do something like that, I would do it the ghetto way by picking the color, and then using the brush to color over it. It always ended up looking really bad since the original image's color would have a small difference of darkness/brightness to it, and with the way I did it, it made the whole thing look like one color.

Great tutorial, this will help with some of the individual practice images I do!

The Guru
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#8

Posted 15 August 2010 - 05:45 AM

I've always had my problems with the Spot Healing Brush but I tihnk this should have helped a lot. I'll post a result of it soon.

massrcor
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#9

Posted 15 August 2010 - 05:47 AM

overall good [tut] gamesguru.

Hopefully i'll contribute some [tut] once i'm done with Graphic Design in college, Which I'm just now starting in like 17 days!!!11! cool.gif

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#10

Posted 15 August 2010 - 03:59 PM

thanks for sharing icon14.gif

Ats.
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#11

Posted 17 August 2010 - 12:05 AM

Woow! Nice tut, very helpful.

The-King
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#12

Posted 17 August 2010 - 12:12 AM

Couldn't the same effect be achieved using the Clone Stamp more or less?

Wolf68k
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#13

Posted 17 August 2010 - 01:24 AM Edited by Wolf68k, 17 August 2010 - 01:27 AM.

QUOTE (The-King @ Aug 16 2010, 18:12)
Couldn't the same effect be achieved using the Clone Stamp more or less?

The problem with the Clone tool is that you have to be dead on. And the Clone tool once you pick the sample area it rides along with the brush.
With the Spot Healing Brush it doesn't need to sample anything, you just run it over the area and does the work for you sampling as it goes. The Healing Brush is kind of the same thing but it does need a sample spot to work from and as you work with it it's sample anchor stays where you selected the sample to start with but it still pulls in information from around the brush as well.

You really need PS to play around it yourself to see it work.

To get the same effect from the Clone tool you would have to do what people did in the past, which was use a very small brush size and sample a little here, apply it, sample from other there, apply it, sample some more from yet another spot, apply it. So yes you can use the Clone tool to the same thing, more but by no means less work.


For what manbearpigy did, the clone tool would work just about the same, maybe a bit for more. If it wasn't for the slight reflection you could almost get away with what Blizzard14 said he does/did.

Robinski
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#14

Posted 17 August 2010 - 09:30 AM

I've always been confused as to what the Spot Healing Brush actually does, and as such have generally avoided using it. For stuff like the examples in the thread (the can and the iPhone) I'd use a combination of the clone brush and content aware fill (obviously only recently) and get a similar result.

My most recent example of this would be this 'shop I did for on another forum where I had to remove a lot of the horse and replace it with background which wasn't there before.
user posted imageuser posted image

Yeah yeah, I know the dirtbike looks like sh*t and doesn't blend in well with the rest of the painting, but after banishing the horse I couldn't be f*cked anymore. The effect on the background actually looks terrible when looked at critically and with the source pic, but when viewed by itself it looks pretty good.

I might have to go back and fix it later on.




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