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Recommended Reads

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Mokrie Dela
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#61

Posted 07 February 2011 - 12:53 PM

QUOTE (Pearlie @ Feb 7 2011, 08:58)
Add to the list:

-Scarecrow
Matthew Riley

And all of his books with Scarecrow

What about the description? Why do you think people should read this book. Sell it to us! tounge.gif

drscot
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#62

Posted 03 April 2011 - 09:32 PM

i cba atm, but im gonna write a review for all the richard castle books from the tv series castle, im glad they axtually started making them wink.gif

Mokrie Dela
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#63

Posted 03 April 2011 - 11:31 PM

Cool. Well i assume you've read the first post and can see how it works - the description/why people should read it is vital - not everyone gets that. The isbn/url will help me but i can get those smile.gif

I look forward to checking them out!
The ones i've checked out so far i was impressed by! smile.gif

BTW if you, or anyone else, has read anything on this list, please feel free to discuss it smile.gif

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#64

Posted 01 July 2011 - 01:36 AM

This looks like a fun thread, good job. I've read a fair bit recently; having done an English degree I've had to plough through a fair bit of tedious sh*te but I've occasionally come across books that have surprised me. If anything comes to mind I'll share here and look forward to reading some of your suggestions smile.gif

One that comes to mind is Ian McEwan's Saturday. It's not the kind of thing I'd read for pleasure normally- I tend to read historical books, biographies, crime novels and true crime narratives- but it came up on my course as a pivotal book in modern British fiction. Against the backdrop of the 2003 London anti-war protests, we follow a day in the life of a successful neurosurgeon called Henry. On his way to play a game of squash he gets into a disagreement with an angry young man named Baxter. Little does Henry realise that this confrontation will not change his life but that of his whole family as his children, wife and in-laws await him for a family gathering. I think I read this book faster than any other on the course because McEwan's writing was engaging, funny and thrilling. I think it's ironic that Henry is a neurosurgeon because- as cheesy as this sounds- you really find yourself inside his mind, he's a very interesting creation. There are a number of scenes in Saturday that really take your breath away but I don't want to discuss them as it may spoil the story. If you feel like coming out of your comfort zone, give Saturday a read.

ISBN: 0224072994

Mokrie Dela
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#65

Posted 01 July 2011 - 11:12 AM

QUOTE (SIKKS66 @ Friday, Jul 1 2011, 01:36)
This looks like a fun thread, good job. I've read a fair bit recently; having done an English degree I've had to plough through a fair bit of tedious sh*te but I've occasionally come across books that have surprised me. If anything comes to mind I'll share here and look forward to reading some of your suggestions smile.gif

One that comes to mind is Ian McEwan's Saturday. It's not the kind of thing I'd read for pleasure normally- I tend to read historical books, biographies, crime novels and true crime narratives- but it came up on my course as a pivotal book in modern British fiction. Against the backdrop of the 2003 London anti-war protests, we follow a day in the life of a successful neurosurgeon called Henry. On his way to play a game of squash he gets into a disagreement with an angry young man named Baxter. Little does Henry realise that this confrontation will not change his life but that of his whole family as his children, wife and in-laws await him for a family gathering. I think I read this book faster than any other on the course because McEwan's writing was engaging, funny and thrilling. I think it's ironic that Henry is a neurosurgeon because- as cheesy as this sounds- you really find yourself inside his mind, he's a very interesting creation. There are a number of scenes in Saturday that really take your breath away but I don't want to discuss them as it may spoil the story. If you feel like coming out of your comfort zone, give Saturday a read.

ISBN: 0224072994

That's a huge description tounge.gif

Could you make it a little smaller? (if you can't d/w). I've added that to the list smile.gif

Thanks for participating! tounge.gif

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#66

Posted 01 July 2011 - 06:03 PM

Hmmm, I can't believe this one isn't on here yet!

user posted image

Brave New World by Aldous Huxley, such an excellent book that really does depict what modern day life is becoming. smile.gif

I'll just start listing some awesome titles now tounge.gif

The Iliad - Homer
The Odyssey - Homer
Tuesdays with Morrie - Mitch Albom
Of Mice and Men - John Steinbeck
In Cold Blood - Truman Capote (A truly, awesome read!)
The Things They Carried - Tim O' Brien

smile.gif

Mokrie Dela
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#67

Posted 01 July 2011 - 11:08 PM

QUOTE (RadioIsotope @ Friday, Jul 1 2011, 18:03)
Hmmm, I can't believe this one isn't on here yet!

user posted image

Brave New World by Aldous Huxley, such an excellent book that really does depict what modern day life is becoming. smile.gif

I'll just start listing some awesome titles now tounge.gif

The Iliad - Homer
The Odyssey - Homer
Tuesdays with Morrie - Mitch Albom
Of Mice and Men - John Steinbeck
In Cold Blood - Truman Capote (A truly, awesome read!)
The Things They Carried - Tim O' Brien

smile.gif

@ the list - You're not saying why people should read these books! tounge.gif sell them to us tounge.gif

I'll add brave new world up, though if you could elaborate on why the book's so good, that'd be cool smile.gif

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#68

Posted 01 July 2011 - 11:10 PM

If anybody likes crime books, non-fiction then take a look at these three books here...

user posted image

This book "Gomorrah" written by Roberto Saviano who now has to be protected 24/7 by armed carabinieri body guards due to his book unleashing some of the Camorra's or known as the Neapolitan Mafia's deep secrets and how they carry out their criminal activity globally. One of the most interesting things I found out in this book is that Scampia has Europe's largest open air drug market in the whole of Europe.

user posted image

Joaquin Garcia or known more by the name Jack Falcone is the second FBI agent in the History of the Mafia in America to be offered the place of a Made man since Donnie Brasco. However his goal of infiltrating the Mafia to the full is impossible and very dangerous if found out that not onlt is he a Cuban instead of an Italian, but that he works for the government.

Mokrie Dela
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#69

Posted 01 July 2011 - 11:15 PM

QUOTE (Mokrie Dela @ Thursday, May 6 2010, 17:15)
Also this is for FICTION. If you want to recommend poetry books or factual books, feel free to set up a new topic. (Any posts that break these rules will not be added to the list).

Sorry man. Fiction only! tounge.gif

Has anyone read the listed books? Whats your thoughts on them?

As mentioned before I loved A Scanner darkly, and am grateful for unoriginal for recommending it. The films not bad either (i actually plan to buy the book and the film tounge.gif )

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#70

Posted 02 July 2011 - 12:24 AM Edited by Panz, 02 July 2011 - 12:32 AM.

Well, I just read The Road by Cormac McCarthy last night.

It's a post-apocalyptic story following a sick man and his son as they travel through a dead world covered in ash. The world is riddled with cannibals and thieves and, unfortunately, no food because it's all either been destroyed in fires or taken by someone else. The man and son's goal is to move south toward the coast because they can no longer live where they've been staying through another winter, and they encounter some very traumatic and emotional events along the way. This is definitely one of the saddest and most depressing books I've read. Beware, McCarthy hates using punctuation in his writing, so I hope you can bear with it. Otherwise, the man writes like a genius; I read it straight through in just a few hours.

(If you like post-apocalyptic tales like this, I'd also recommend On the Beach by Nevil Shute. It's definitely worth reading despite the slow start to it all. It just focuses on radiation basically wiping out humanity. That's really all there is to say about it.)

Thanks for this topic, by the way. I've been trying to find some good books to read so that I can get into the habit of reading for when college comes. Great idea. icon14.gif

Edit: As for your question, I've read To Kill a Mockingbird..I'm sure most people have. That's an awesome book. I mean, I read it a few years ago, and then they required me to read it in school, so I read it again and enjoyed it just as much.
I've heard good things about The Boy in the Stripd Pyjamas as well..That's probably going to be next on my list.

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#71

Posted 02 July 2011 - 10:10 AM Edited by methods., 02 July 2011 - 10:15 AM.

McCarthy is definitely my favourite author! The Road is so brutal, that scene when they stumble upon the cannibal house left me scared for weaks. If you haven't already definitely, read more of his books, Blood Meridian is my number one by him.

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#72

Posted 02 July 2011 - 01:17 PM

Yeah! I read around that Blood Meridian is McCarthy's best work. I'm hoping to pick it up today, actually. He writes so simply sometimes, but it works very well.

And yeah, that scene was horrifying as well as the scene where they were cooking the infant on the stick. I don't know if you saw the movie adaptation, but they left that scene out. I'm glad about that. tounge.gif

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#73

Posted 02 July 2011 - 11:33 PM Edited by Mokrie Dela, 02 July 2011 - 11:37 PM.

Glad to see this topic alive again! smile.gif
I'll add the books to the list

QUOTE
Thanks for this topic, by the way. I've been trying to find some good books to read so that I can get into the habit of reading for when college comes. Great idea

No problem man, that's the idea of it smile.gif
When i get time to read more i plan to go through the rest of this list. I (obviously) highly recommend Rainbow Six, Alamut, and A Scanner Darkly. OF the ones that i remember well, these are good reads!

Edit : thanks for linking to the amazon site! smile.gif

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#74

Posted 13 July 2011 - 09:02 PM

One book I'd recommend is 'Johnny got his gun' by Dalton Trumbo. It follows the story of a young soldier who is lying in a hospital bed after losing both arms and legs as well as most of his face on the last days of the first world war.

Having lost all senses and the ability to communicate with the outside world while still having a fully functioning mind, he becomes a prisoner, trapped inside his own mind. The story is told from the perspective of the soldier and the majority of the book is spent with him drifting in and out of conciousness, unable to tell if he is awake, asleep or even alive all the while trying to piece back together what happened to him as well as trying to find a method of communication so he can let the outside world know that a part of him is still active. Parts of the story are given in the form of his memories as he remembers a time when he wasn't the way he is in the novel. These sections allow the reader to get a bit of back story on the character and allow for Trumbo to show what kind of man the soldier once was.

At it's heart it is a anti-war novel with a brilliant story and fantastic end that I would recommend to anyone who has the time to read it.

Mokrie Dela
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#75

Posted 13 July 2011 - 10:42 PM

QUOTE (Afro Zombie @ Wednesday, Jul 13 2011, 21:02)
One book I'd recommend is 'Johnny got his gun' by Dalton Trumbo. It follows the story of a young soldier who is lying in a hospital bed after losing both arms and legs as well as most of his face on the last days of the first world war.

Having lost all senses and the ability to communicate with the outside world while still having a fully functioning mind, he becomes a prisoner, trapped inside his own mind. The story is told from the perspective of the soldier and the majority of the book is spent with him drifting in and out of conciousness, unable to tell if he is awake, asleep or even alive all the while trying to piece back together what happened to him as well as trying to find a method of communication so he can let the outside world know that a part of him is still active. Parts of the story are given in the form of his memories as he remembers a time when he wasn't the way he is in the novel. These sections allow the reader to get a bit of back story on the character and allow for Trumbo to show what kind of man the soldier once was.

At it's heart it is a anti-war novel with a brilliant story and fantastic end that I would recommend to anyone who has the time to read it.

added smile.gif

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#76

Posted 13 July 2011 - 11:21 PM Edited by StoneHead37, 14 July 2011 - 03:37 PM.

Add this to the list.

TITLE: Flowers for Algernon
AUTHOR: Daniel Keyes
ISNB: 0-15-131510-8
RECOMMENDED BY: StoneHead37
DESCRIPTION: Charlie Gordon, age 32, has an IQ of 68 and works as a janitor and delivery boy at a bakery, which his uncle Herman had to secured for him so Charlie would not be sent to the Warren State Home, an institution for the mentally retarded. Charlie dreams about becoming a genius and attends adult school at the Beekman College Center for Retarded Adults. His teaching instructor's name is Alice Kinnian who is young, attractive and vibrant. Two researchers at Beekman, Professor Nemur and Dr. Strauss are looking to perform their new surgical technique, designed to boost the overall intelligence of any living being. They have only tested on animals, including a white lab mouse named Algernon. Algernon's intelligence has reached great heights because of the surgery he received. Strauss and Nemur decide to use Charlie for the experiment due to his will to learn and recommendations from Alice. The surgery dramatically changes Charlie in more ways then one.

I recommend it because this book is truly inspiring. It proves that even people with mental disorders are willing and able to reach great heights to become smart.

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#77

Posted 02 August 2011 - 09:43 PM Edited by mark-2007, 02 August 2011 - 09:55 PM.

I just finished reading The Death of Ivan Ilyich by Leo Tolstoy, the edition included The Devil too. Both were excellent. The former took up the majority of the book, but was still a short story at around 60 pages. As the name may suggest, it deals with Ivan Ilyich's death, beginning with a look at how those closest to him dealt with such news (a "rather him than me" attitude, despite being close friends) and then went on to tell of Ivan Ilyich's life before setting up his illness. The story focuses on Ilyich's fear of death and the meaning of life and death as a whole - whether he had lived a "good life" or not.

The Devil weighs in at little over 40 pages and deals with Evgeny Irtenev who, upon the death of his father, inherits the family estate (along with his late father's crippling debts). Moving to the estate and determined to turn his family's fortunes around, he begins to sell off parts of the land and create a profitable farm. However, he soon begins to miss the city life of St. Petersburg (read: a f*ck buddy) and begins a relationship with a peasant woman, Stepanida. Several months later, he meets another woman (Liza) and, breaking off relations with Stepanida, marries her. What entails is a happy, married life until almost a year later when he sees Stepanida again. The story from there revolves round Evgeny's mental torture between his wife and his former mistress, eventually leading to disaster.

I'm unsure about the rest of Tolstoy's work, but these two short stories are very critical of the Russian upper classes, the correct (or "comme il faut" as I think Tolstoy puts it) way of life they lead, and the hollowness of it.

I'd highly recommend them, and plan on delving into Tolstoy's longer work. Big novels always sort of put me off as I'm quite a slow reader, but I might pick up Anna Karenina soon.

I'm gonna start on The Popular Girl, which is bunched together with four other short stories, by F. Scott Fitzgerald. I loved The Great Gatsby and have been meaning to read more by him.

I also bought James Joyce's Ulysses. Couldn't find it in the library and always wanted to give it a go. It looks dauntingly long, probably will take a while for my eyes to get through.

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#78

Posted 03 August 2011 - 11:41 PM

QUOTE (StoneHead37 @ Wednesday, Jul 13 2011, 23:21)
Add this to the list.

TITLE: Flowers for Algernon
AUTHOR: Daniel Keyes
ISNB: 0-15-131510-8
RECOMMENDED BY: StoneHead37
DESCRIPTION: Charlie Gordon, age 32, has an IQ of 68 and works as a janitor and delivery boy at a bakery, which his uncle Herman had to secured for him so Charlie would not be sent to the Warren State Home, an institution for the mentally retarded. Charlie dreams about becoming a genius and attends adult school at the Beekman College Center for Retarded Adults. His teaching instructor's name is Alice Kinnian who is young, attractive and vibrant. Two researchers at Beekman, Professor Nemur and Dr. Strauss are looking to perform their new surgical technique, designed to boost the overall intelligence of any living being. They have only tested on animals, including a white lab mouse named Algernon. Algernon's intelligence has reached great heights because of the surgery he received. Strauss and Nemur decide to use Charlie for the experiment due to his will to learn and recommendations from Alice. The surgery dramatically changes Charlie in more ways then one.

I recommend it because this book is truly inspiring. It proves that even people with mental disorders are willing and able to reach great heights to become smart.

Kudos on making things easy for me

StoneHead's and Mark's suggestions are up smile.gif

Anyone read any of the books on there?

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#79

Posted 04 August 2011 - 07:39 AM

I've read a few, but I'm sorry to say most were mandatory reads through school and college. I did read The Call Of Cthulhu recently though and decided to download the audiobook version to stick on my iPod. I've been on a bit of non-fiction binge lately having just wrapped up Ben Collins' book (Man In The White Suit, which tells the story of how he came to be The Stig) and Stephen Fry's new autobiography. I intend to take advantage of my local Waterstones' 3 for 2 deal so I'll keep you posted.

I like Stone Head's layout. Maybe that should be the recommended guideline for suggesting a book?

Just to note, Flowers For Algernon is listed twice with a different description. Is it split for a reason or is it just a mild cock-up? smile.gif

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#80

Posted 04 August 2011 - 09:21 AM

QUOTE (RadioIsotope @ Friday, Jul 1 2011, 18:03)
Hmmm, I can't believe this one isn't on here yet!

user posted image

Brave New World by Aldous Huxley, such an excellent book that really does depict what modern day life is becoming. smile.gif

I'll just start listing some awesome titles now tounge.gif

The Iliad - Homer
The Odyssey - Homer
Tuesdays with Morrie - Mitch Albom
Of Mice and Men - John Steinbeck
In Cold Blood - Truman Capote (A truly, awesome read!)
The Things They Carried - Tim O' Brien

smile.gif

Brave New World is excellent, but you can't mention it without mentioning George Orwell's 1984.


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#81

Posted 04 August 2011 - 10:41 AM

QUOTE (Craig @ Thursday, Aug 4 2011, 07:39)
I've read a few, but I'm sorry to say most were mandatory reads through school and college. I did read The Call Of Cthulhu recently though and decided to download the audiobook version to stick on my iPod. I've been on a bit of non-fiction binge lately having just wrapped up Ben Collins' book (Man In The White Suit, which tells the story of how he came to be The Stig) and Stephen Fry's new autobiography. I intend to take advantage of my local Waterstones' 3 for 2 deal so I'll keep you posted.

I like Stone Head's layout. Maybe that should be the recommended guideline for suggesting a book?

Just to note, Flowers For Algernon is listed twice with a different description. Is it split for a reason or is it just a mild cock-up? smile.gif

That would indeed be a cock up tounge.gif

I agree that Stonehead's method should be the template - but I'm not gonna enforce that or anything. If people post a book, with an adequate description (other then "this is good" tounge.gif ) then I'll still post it.

As soon as i'm finished with Splinter Cell: Endgame, I'm gonna look through this list and read more of them!



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#82

Posted 04 August 2011 - 02:19 PM

No worries.

Also, if you want to add a guideline template, here's a code for it.

TITLE: Name
AUTHOR: Author
ISBN: 0-00-000-00
RECOMMENDED BY: Member
DESCRIPTION: Description


CODE
[b][u]TITLE:[/b][/u] Name
[b][u]AUTHOR:[/b][/u] Author
[b][u]ISBN:[/b][/u] 0-00-000-00
[b][u]RECOMMENDED BY:[/b][/u] Member
[b][u]DESCRIPTION:[/b][/u] Description

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#83

Posted 15 April 2012 - 05:01 AM

Big bump but I've always quite liked reading other peoples' suggestions, so, after being reminded of it in the Writers' Resources topic, I decided a bump isn't necessarily a bad thing in this case.

Just looked over my previous post here, perhaps, if it's not too much of a hassle, change The Devil's description so as to not give away the plot too much. Something more like: "This book centres around Evgeny Irtenev who has recently inherited his father's land (and debt) and sets about re-establishing the Irtenev name to it former respectable status. What entails is a story of redemption gone wrong, with Evgeny torn between love and lust, leading to a memorable and dramatic conclusion."

Late reads:

TITLE: Ham On Rye
AUTHOR: Charles Bukowski
ISBN: 0-87685-558-3
RECOMMENDED BY: mark-2007
DESCRIPTION: Ham On Rye is the semi-autobiographical account of Bukowski's upbringing. The central character, Henry Chinaski, is a tough loner, a true anti-hero. The book takes the reader from Chinaski's birth, through visits to his grandparents, to tales of domestic abuse at the hands of his violent father, encompassing Chinaski's troubles with girls in high school - not helped by a bad case of acne - and takes you up to news of Pearl Harbour, at which point Chinaski is going it alone as a part-time writer and full-time alcoholic. It's a coming-of-age tale different to others I've previously read. It's not a positive book, and Chinaski is often an unlikeable character, but Ham On Rye is one of my recent favourites.

TITLE: Tender Is The Night
AUTHOR: F. Scott Fitzgerald
ISBN: Don't know
RECOMMENDED BY: mark-2007
DESCRIPTION: This novel, Fitzgerald's final, completed one, revolves around the marriage of Dick Diver, a promising psychologist, to the beautiful Nicole. The Divers associate with a whole host of characters that gather around their Mediterranean retreat, including a Hollywood starlet, a professional soldier, and a talented musician plagued by alcoholism amongst others. The book begins with up-and-coming actress, Rosemary Hoyt, sunbathing on the beach and soon descends into her involvement in the inner circle of the Divers and, eventually, the marriage itself. Reflective of Fitzgerald's own marriage to Zelda Sayre, this is a romance, but not a particularly happy one. Great read.

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#84

Posted 15 April 2012 - 04:57 PM

TITLE: Carrie
AUTHOR: Stephen King
ISBN: 978-0-385-08695-0
RECOMMENDED BY: Ziggy455
DESCRIPTION: The book that launched King's career, Carrie is a the story of a bullied girl who lives with her manipulative and fundamentalist mother. Unknowing to all of her bullying peers, Carrie possesses the talent of TK or Telekinesis. The story builds up well and the last hundred pages are well worth the read. I thought it was a brilliant story.

I'll upload more once I've had a big read through. tounge2.gif

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#85

Posted 15 April 2012 - 05:28 PM

TITLE: Small Gods
AUTHOR: Terry Pratchett
ISBN: 0-552-13890-8
RECOMMENDED BY: Craig
DESCRIPTION: This novel is the 13th book in the "Discworld" series by Terry Pratchett. It tells the story of the great God Om who has returned to Discworld in the body of a tortoise, stripped of his powers, and desperate to spread the word about the coming of an eighth prophet. In the process, it satirises religious institutions, people, and practices, and the role of religion in political life. Memorable characters and a genuine charm in storytelling make this one of the most unique entries in the Discworld series, and you really see Pratchett as a godfather of fantasy.

By the way, if any of that description flew right over your head, I don't blame you. I haven't read much of Pratchett at all, so I can still read that blurb as an outsider and just think what nonsense it must seem. Even if you haven't read any of the Discworld series, it's easy to pick up and get into. It doesn't so much dwell on everything before things kick off (just to bring you up to speed) but you get a fair bit of introduction, what things look like, who people are and just what Discworld is with natural fluidity. It's like you've read a book of his before, even if you haven't.

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#86

Posted 15 April 2012 - 11:52 PM

they've been added and Mark, your change has been done.

Quite a little list developing there. If you're looking for things to read, then cookies to the first person to read all of that list!

I might request some GFX to advertise this in my sig...

AceRay
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#87

Posted 24 May 2012 - 09:18 AM

TITLE: The Kite Runner
AUTHOR: Khaled Hosseini
ISBN: 978-0747566533
RECOMMENDED BY: AceRay
DESCRIPTION: This amazing novel tells the story of two young boys in 1970s Afghanistan before one them commits the ultimate betrayal. The novel describes the fall of Afghanistan which is ravened by war for over 20 years, first by the Soviets, and then under the reign of the Taliban. Hosseini is a great story teller. The twist that Amir and Hassan are brothers is beautifully laid out.

TITLE: A Thousand Splendid Suns
AUTHOR: Khaled Hosseini
ISBN: 978-1594483851
RECOMMENDED BY: AceRay
DESCRIPTION: The other book Hosseini has written and, in my opinion, an even better read. It tells the tale of two women and their struggles under the sexist Afghanistan culture and traditions. One of the reasons its better is that it stays in Afghanistan the entire time, letting the reader see how the war completely destroys the country over a long and slow period of time, ending in the tragedy of the Taliban's reign of terror rather than it just suddenly being an awful place. Furthermore, I felt the antagonist was a lot more threatening, more menacing than The Kite Runner's ridiculous villain. Mariam's death scene at the end is an absolute tear jerker, as is when you realize Tariq is still alive. A fantastic book, I cannot recommend it more.

Mokrie Dela
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#88

Posted 24 May 2012 - 10:40 AM

Ace, the books have been added. Has anyone read any of the book on this list?

AceRay
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#89

Posted 24 May 2012 - 08:30 PM

QUOTE (Mokrie Dela @ Thursday, May 24 2012, 23:40)
Ace, the books have been added. Has anyone read any of the book on this list?

Eek! You've missed the spoiler tags!

I think I read Boy in the Striped Pyjamas a while back.

Mokrie Dela
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    Story/Poem of the Year 2011 "Justice in Flames"
    Story/Poem of the Year 2010 "City of Lies"

#90

Posted 24 May 2012 - 08:38 PM

QUOTE (AceRay @ Thursday, May 24 2012, 20:30)
QUOTE (Mokrie Dela @ Thursday, May 24 2012, 23:40)
Ace, the books have been added. Has anyone read any of the book on this list?

Eek! You've missed the spoiler tags!

I think I read Boy in the Striped Pyjamas a while back.

Fixed

I'm currently reading the Tom Clancy series, and when done I plan to read each and every book on this list. I got Alamut for Christmas and plan to buy A scanner Darkly. I really enjoyed that book. It was strange to get into it at first but was cool. Film was good too




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