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Last Movie You've Seen

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Mister Pink
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#2221

Posted 24 January 2013 - 06:40 PM Edited by ThePinkFloydSound, 24 January 2013 - 08:56 PM.

@GTA-King: I don't know if I'd recommend it. It's kind of drawn-out for the most part. It's pretty mental though. If you want a good film thats got plain weirdness but an amazing storyline with a bigger budget, I'd recommend Ichi The Killer. It\s by the same writer/director.

It's basically about a guy who brainwashes another poor guy to become a super killer and take out the Yakuza. Meanwhile Kakihare, a Yakuza man searches for his missing boss. He makes it his number one to find his boss as his boss beats him and he gets satisfaction from it and his boss is the best at doing it. Meanwhile Ichi The Killer is going after the Yakuza and the dado-maschochist Yakuza is looking for whoever knows about this boss. So it's like this killer and a guy who likes to get beat are out there and they may cross paths. I think I explained it OK. It's been a long time since I've watched it. It's one of the most violent films out there and I think it got banned in a few countries.

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Last film I watched was....
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It's based on a true story of the Snowtown murders in Australia. In the film a family where the father has left the home another man meets the mother. It turns out this man is a pedo. When another neighbour finds out he starts a mini-campaign to get the pedo to leave. We then discover that e's starting to groom one of the victims to assist him in his serial killing past times, usually under the guise that it's OK because they were a pedo or gay. They also murdered disabled people. The film is done like a realism film. The mother wasn't an actress before. She won an award for her role. She has a look about her like she was once beautiful but had a hard life. Highly recommended. Probably one of the best films I've seen in a while. It's quite disturbing though and its based on a real story.

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#2222

Posted 24 January 2013 - 07:03 PM

QUOTE (ThePinkFloydSound @ Thursday, Jan 24 2013, 18:40)
@GTA-King: I don't know if I'd recommend it. It's kind of drawn-out for the most part. It's pretty mental though. If you want a good film thats got plain weirdness but an amazing storyline with a bigger budget, I'd recommend Ichi The Killer. It's by the same writer/director.

I was planning on watching it baked, haha. But I'll give that other movie a try too! icon14.gif

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#2223

Posted 24 January 2013 - 08:56 PM

QUOTE (GTA-King @ Thursday, Jan 24 2013, 20:03)
QUOTE (ThePinkFloydSound @ Thursday, Jan 24 2013, 18:40)
@GTA-King: I don't know if I'd recommend it. It's kind of drawn-out for the most part. It's pretty mental though. If you want a good film thats got plain weirdness but an amazing storyline with a bigger budget, I'd recommend Ichi The Killer. It's by the same writer/director.

I was planning on watching it baked, haha. But I'll give that other movie a try too! icon14.gif

Nice one. What a head-f*ck that would be. I'm going to watch it probably tomorrow night. Please let me know your thoughts on it. It would be nice to chat with someone about it. It's ages since I've watched it but it just left such an impression on me.

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#2224

Posted 25 January 2013 - 05:35 AM

Well I saw two movies yesterday on my birthday so I'll talk about them. smile.gif

The first I saw was Django Unchained. I freaking loved it. From the very start it captured the atmosphere of Westerns perfectly, and had just the right amount of action, story telling and humour to keep the film going along at a nice pace. It does stumble towards the end though if I had to criticise, but that didn't mar my enjoyment of the film. I can easily recommend anyone go see this film ASAP if they haven't already done so.

The second I saw was The Guilt Trip. My mum decided to take me so I said why the hell not. Whilst it wasn't bad per se, it wasn't good. It was very medicore. There weren't that many moments where I found myself actually laughing, as opposed to just a minor chuckle. I actually laughed way harder at Django, so considering this is meant to be a comedy that is something very wrong with it. Even my mum and sister agreed that it wasn't that funny. It has a couple of sweet moments between Rogen and Streisand but they don't come close to making up for the films lack of humour. Also the product placement is god awful, there were many shots where most of the frame is taken up by a giant logo, and some shots that were completely irrelevant except for the logo of the company. It was very distracting and was another poiunt for me not enjoying the film all that much. I really can't recommend this to anyone as it is flat out not good.

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#2225

Posted 25 January 2013 - 06:56 AM

Good summary of Django, that's exactly how I felt about it. Even what you said about towards the end. Very enjoyable film.

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#2226

Posted 25 January 2013 - 11:03 PM Edited by I So Brink, 27 January 2013 - 01:33 AM.

Awards season is here and I am a massive pirate:

It's strange that there's been practically no discussion on the entire forum about such an acclaimed film:

Zero Dark Thirty (2012)

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Okay, so after watching Django I've decided I'm getting award season fever so I'm gonna blast through as many Best Picture nominations as I can (it's a travesty that Django wasn't in there) just so I can be properly outraged when something sh*t wins as it always does at the Oscars.

Anyway... Zero Dark Thirty (and its fantastic poster, above). A film about the hunt for and capture of Osama bin Laden could have gone two ways. It could have gone the "bang bang shoot our way through Afghanistan until we realise we should be looking in Pakistan then blast our way through there too" or it could have gone the way it did and be more of a Law and Order style police procedural with the "police" being the CIA. It's all the better for it really, especially considering an "Ooh-rah let's shoot us some terrists"flick would have been exactly the propaganda I was glad ZDT never really became.

With much more focus on drama and procedure, ZDT isn't the action film that you might think you're getting from the first trailer (not to mention the fact that you only see half of Jessica Chastain's face and the back of her head for a second in it, but sexism in marketing films is another discussion for another day). There is, obviously, a quite action packed set piece towards the end (you can probably guess what that involves if you've watched a news programme in the past two years) but it's not indicative of the rest of the film. The majority of screentime centres around Jessica Chastain's Maya and her obsessive ten year journey to be the one who is responsible for finding public enemy number one. Spanning ten years and two continents means that there isn't really much room for any of the rest of the cast to make much of an impression. This is pretty much the Jessica Chastain Show, and she runs it well. As you would hope, you get quite a lot of character development over a decade. Maya runs through a multitude of grey areas morally and emotionally through her career and they take their toll. From the tentative and wary person she is in her first "enhanced" interrogation to the very Carrie-from-Homeland type character she becomes. The mission consumes her and becomes her entire life, delivering a very poignant scene at the very end of the film.

The events at the beginning of the movie that mold her into a harder person have been pretty controversial themselves. Featuring depictions of detainees being waterboardied, put into stress positions, locked in boxes and beaten, the film's stance regarding torture has been varied. Some interpret it as a condemnation of the CIA and wider US Govt. treatment of detainees, and other see it as a message saying that torture is a necessary evil. I was very fearful of being fed some bullsh*t propaganda message about how the treatment was justified but I don't think I got that. the impression I took from it was that this was simply what happened, and we're left to make our own judgement about it. One criticism I'd level on that note though is how much of a point is made of the Obama administration's clamp down on torture/enhanced interrogation. The CIA staff make it sound as if his office actually made it all stop completely and immediately, when it's pretty clear that did not and has not happened.

I'm very glad that Kathryn Bigelow (director) didn't gloss over the details of the final raid on the compound to paint SEAL Team 6 as unfaultable American heroes*. The raid does mess up where it did in real life, there are casualties that could have been avoided and certain practices (e.g. shooting stationary bodies "just to make sure") that aren't exactly considered respectful happen but overall it seems like a fair and accurate representation. Something I might take issue with is that it's never said out loud that the raid isn't exactly legal for the US to be carrying out on Pakistani soil. It's alluded to, but never spoken in such words. That could've been made clearer.

Overall though, the film doesn't come off to me as political propaganda. There's been a lot of fuss made over how much access Bigelow and co. got to some classified files when doing the research, access that could have been given in return for good lighting, but personally I don't feel like I was campaigned at. That said, despite being a well paced film with an immensely tense finale and an engaging central character, I don't think a film like this should ever be given the award for Best Picture. I know, saying that art shouldn't be rewarded on merit because of its subject matter is borders on fascistic censorship**, but I just think that giving something with such potential to be propaganda such a prestigious award would set a bad precedent. That, and I just think it was a really good film, not a great film.

*Well, I mean I have nothing but respect for the soldiers themselves, they were just doing their jobs. I mean with regards to the mission and the nature of how it was orchestrated.

** I know, I know. I'm a prat.


And to follow that...

Django Unchained (2012)
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Tarantino's been banging on in the film press these past few months about how he thinks directors only get worse once they're "old". Well, consider yourself very much still middle aged Mr Quentin because Django Unchained is not to be missed.

His last film, Inglorious Basterds was often called a spaghetti western in every way but location and time. Having enjoyed that he's obviously taken that interest in spaghetti westerns a little further and given us Django, although of course it couldn't be that straightforward and we get was the director himself has dubbed a "southern". It's an important distinction though. With slavery at the heart of the film it had to be in the south and it had to be pre civil war, so it's markedly different from a lot of the classic westerns in that respect.

Don't get me wrong though, this is a film about slavery but it's not your standard middle-class white guilt fare like Dances with Wolves or something. This sh*t is Tarantino through and through, and that means it's about expressions of power rather than expressions of regret. Django is very much a revenge fantasy made manifest with everything that entails. Django (Jamie Foxx) is a slave who's been recruited and freed by a German bounty hunter, Dr King Schultz (Christoph Waltz), who's offered his freedom in return for his help hunting down some particular targets. Upon hearing of Django's forced separation from his wife, Schultz offers his help in tracking her down and rescuing her. That means rescuing from her newest master, the notoriously sadistic Calvin Candie (Leonardo DiCaprio).

It's these three that make the film. Foxx is perfect as the freed slave going from a defeated man who'd had the only good thing in his life stripped from him to an unstoppable force of nature. The man exudes confidence and power; when Django kicks a door open, you know sh*t's about to go down. Similarly, Waltz delivers yet again for Tarantino. Following his ridiculously good performance as Col. Hans Landa in Inglorious, he's much the same in that Schultz is a smooth wordsmith and charismatic talker, only this time he's not a sadistic nazi but one of the good guys. This time you won't feel a little uncomfortable for really liking him. As for DiCaprio, this is just another nail in the coffin that was my stupid opinion of him. Thanks to films like The Beach and Romeo + Juliet I was sure he was a poor actor, then I saw Catch Me if You Can and figured he got lucky, then I saw Inception, then I saw The Departed and now I've seen Django Unchained and now I think he's one of the best on the scene these days. One particular scene in Django is one for the portfolio, where in an energetic rant the actor actually slashed his hand open by accident but just went with it because it fit the scene perfectly. the guy literally mutilated himself on the job and incorporated it into the scene. The man is fantastic.

That trio does make the film the great piece of work it is, but they don't do it alone. It's by far Tarantino's most mature film yet, but not at the expense of his personal style. Most Tarantino films to date have been flashy, visually and musically exciting films with a bit of a pulpy core in terms of emotion. The trademark flash and shock are still there. Hell, there's so much of the signature bright scarlet blood that one gun fight ends with the walls almost entirely painted with the entrails of the unlucky whiteboys who encountered Django. The humour that goes off on tangents hasn't gone anywhere either. Not to spoil it too much but there's a near enough ten minute sequence devoted to pointing out just how much the local KKK chapter might as well have walked off the Blazing Saddles set. But the devotion and determination of Django to get his wife back runs deeper than most emotional threads in Tarantino films. You could argue about Kill Bill's revenge idea, but you'd be wrong, that's just more of the pulpy flash again.

And that's not even mentioning the amount of hatred and disgust that should rightfully be generated in anyone's heart for Samuel L Jackson's Steven.

A great cast and exciting script lend itself perfectly to Taratino's vision of a western southern. Django is an epic journey through revenge, hate, violence and love with an exciting finale that'll rival any blockbuster on the silver screen these past few years.

Les Misérables (2012)
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I still maintain that one of the places you can find true beauty is in that of honest sadness. I'm not talking "boo hoo I did sh*t on an exam" or "I can't afford all the things I want", I mean proper, balls-to-the-wall, unapologetic despair. Fortunately, as you'd probably guess from the title, Les Misérables has got me covered on my despair quota for this month.

To get this bit out of the way: yes, it's a musical. And yes, I espouse my hate for musicals at more opportunities than it is welcome. But this, this is different. For one, a major factor in why I hate musicals is because the singing always feels so soulless and detached from the rest of the film but this isn't an issue here. Taking the gutsy move to have all performances done live on set (most musicals have the tracks recorded in studios months before the actors even meet on set) director Tom Hooper grants the songs the emotional impact they deserve. Trusting actors to perform, well, while they're performing allows for a whole new dimension of freedom on set; they don;t just have to stick with the track they laid down months ago. Secondly, pretty much the entire film is done "in song". Taking that move eliminates the weird jarring sensation that annoys me so much when people go from spoken dialogue to singing in most musicals. If you're gonna sing, go total immersion and don't let up. It's so much better for it, and the lines that are simply spoken carry so much extra weight.

The standard of the singing is immense and a testament to this method of film-making. There's been a lot of buzz around Anne Hathaway's rendition of Fantine's 'I Dreamed a Dream', and it's completely deserved. Her angry and melancholic version encapsulates the film in a nutshell and will the defining moment of the production for a long time to come. Hathaway's passionate and emotionally driven performance blows out of the water whatever technical showboating rendition that mad Scottish woman could come out with.

Hathaway stands out, but that's no slight on the rest of the cast. Everyone involved, including the fantastic Hugh Jackman and Russel Crowe as Jean val Jean and Inspector Jalvert respectively, knocks it out of the park. Another standout moment that's received notably less press but really stuck with me was Samantha Barks' version of Éponine's 'On My Own'. f*ckin' brilliant.

You really do the gauntlet of sadness with this film. Off the top of my head you've got: throwing away your life to save your families', the shame of becoming a vagrant thief, shame of selling yourself out jsut to support your family, being dehumanised into a piece of meat, physical mutilation*, unrequited love, guilt over not owning up to your own mistakes even if it's to protect others, fear of discovery, discovering that the work you've devoted your life to was an amoral cause, misguided youth being snuffed out amid a just crusade and countless others. So yeah, pretty sad, but beautifully so.

I can't recommend it enough. Even if you're a miserable bastard like myself who thinks they hate musicals, it'll get ya. I find it hard to believe there's been an eye that paid attention through the whole thing that stayed dry.



*I'll always give massive respect to anyone whose willing to physically change their body a great deal for a role especially if it's actually on screen. Hathaway cutting her hair off is to be commended just as much as Natalie Portman having her hair completely shaved in V For Vendetta, a scene I hold up to justify my choice of favourite actress.



Life of Pi (2012)
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The movie of the book deemed "unfilmable" by many. Life of Pi tells the story of a young man, Pi, who becomes lost at sea after a shipwreck involving a shipment of zoo animals. His only companion, a ferocious Bengal tiger. It's a story about determination and finding both yourself and God.

In one sense it's a film that deals a lot with religion, but in a nuanced and sweeping touch. It's not about Christianity, or Islam or Hinduism. It's about a man's personal connection with his own version of a higher power. Pi and his less than friendly companion go through a lot and without each other or a connection to something bigger, they would most likely not come through it as one.

Life of Pi is very much a film you feel as well as watch, so it's hard to describe in exact terms. Even if you don't buy into the message of the film though, it is objective to say that the film is visually breathtaking. It's remarkable what director Ang Lee can manage to do with a small boat, a vast ocean and a smattering of wildlife. It takes him literally only those three things and he creates the most beautiful looking film I've seen probably since Enter the Void. Some of the shots of what pi encounters at night, and the shots of the sinking ship, will most definitely stick with me for a long time.

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#2227

Posted 29 January 2013 - 07:20 PM

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Tony (2009) was OK. If you like serial killer movies, it's definitely worth a watch. It doesn't offer any sort of reasons as you why he did the killings. It doesn't have much of a narrative either but it just shows an interesting look at someone who is complete social outcast. He's been unemployed for 20 years. He doesn't know how to interact socially. The good points of the film are it's short (which is perfect for this sort of film with not much narrative) and it's shot really well. The scenes with the junkies are realistic. It's short sort of realistically as well, on location the junkies seemed real even when they were smoking smack. Worth a look if you like creepy serial killer films.

I also watched Come Sleepwalk With Me. Wasn't bad. Nice story. Enjoyable film about a comedian dealing with his sleepwalking disorder, his long term relationship, commitment and trying to make it as a comedian.

Tonight, I'm watching Hard Boiled. biggrin.gif

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#2228

Posted 03 February 2013 - 12:45 AM

Argo
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My week continued with CIA Glorification Motion Picture Feature #2 (the first being Zero Dark Thirty, kinda) aka Argo. That's unfair really, I just liked the idea of the Oscars being some CIA propaganda machine.

As the poster above so helpfully mentions, Argo is Ben Affleck's directorial follow up to The Town, which is one of my favourite crime movies of recent years. I don't know what happened to Ben Affleck after Good Will Hunting (which he co-wrote) but apart from Dogma in '99 he was pretty much in sh*t films at worst and mediocre ones at best. Then someone had the bright idea of putting him behind the camera and, what do you know? He's great at it. Whoever told Affleck to go into acting rather than directing back in the mid nineties needs some sort of time-travel delivered slap in the face.

Argo is a spy thriller set during the Iranian revolution of 79-81. Iran's ruling Shah has been other-thrown and the US has taken him in. Naturally, this got on the nerves of the revolutionary Iranians and they storm the US embassy in Tehran taking everyone inside hostage. Unbeknownst to the hostage takers though, six staff escaped and managed to find sanctuary with the Canadian ambassador. To get them out, Ben Affleck's CIA character (he still insists on being in his films, ugh) hatches a plan revolving around a fake sci-fi movie all ready to shoot in Iran. He flies in, picks them up, pretends they're part of his space-opera-making team, flies out again. Simple. As describe by one character it is the "best bad idea we have. By far".

So it's a film about making a film only it's not. It sounds complicated and like it could be some meta-satire of the film making industry but it's not. It's a very straightforward, well crafted thriller full of appropriate tension. I can't put it down to Affleck having to stick to historical accuracy or if it's his deft hand learning when to ease off the gas, but the temptation to go all out with action sequences is resisted. There aren't any massive gun battles and most of the violence is psychological. Of the actual violence that you do see, it's all justified. Much like ZDT, Argo is quite a balanced take on a conflict. The opening titles give a fair assessment of why the Iranian people are justifiably angry. It would have been easy to make out them to just be scary foreigners, especially considering the modern US's stance on Iran. Adding to that, one of the people who protects the group would have been the one who fell into the category of untrustworthy native in an Argo made by a lot of people other than Affleck.

There are a couple of plot points that are signposted a little too heavy handedly (you will absolutely know in advance who causes one of the f*ck-ups in the escape) and there is the trademark irrelevant subplot. In The Town it was the romance with the bank clerk, without whom the film wouldn't lose anything, and in Argo its Ben Affleck's home life. It's got no relevance to the plot or any of the character's development really, but it's not so prominent that it takes anything away from the rest of the film at all.

I haven't yet seen Afflecks directorial début in Gone Baby Gone, but with Argo, The Town and Good Will Hunting it's clear that he was born to be behind the camera. Argo's probably the best so far and hopefully a sign that things will only get better for this actor-come-director.

The Hobbit: An Unexpected Journey
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I've always commended Peter Jackson for managing to trim down the three massive novels of The Lord of the Rings down into nine hours (twelve if you watch the proper versions) without skimping out too much on the lore and backstory of Middle Earth.

But then he went and decided that The Hobbit, a 300 page book largely aimed at children (and for reference, the shortest of the thee LotR book was over 400 pages), needed to be made into three full films itself. The entire premise of the book is Bilbo Baggins, hobbit bachelor-come-adventurer, goes on a quest with a motley band of dwarves to fight a dragon and claim his ill-gotten treasure. Well, not to spoil it, but by the end of this first film they've just caught their first glimpse of the dragon's lair. And it's literally a point on the horizon at this moment.

Now to be fair, Jackson isn't just doing a word-for-word depiction of the book, largely because there wouldn't be enough words in the book to fill a trilogy. There is a lot of scene setting and world building coming from the various appendices from other books and I think some stuff from The Silmarillion, so there is some extra stuff that you don't get in The Hobbit, the book. Fans of the series will be able to piece together a lot of the dark shadows forming behind the curtains, setting the stage for the return of Sauron with the next generation of Bagginses.

That itself is the biggest problem the film has though. The Hobbit is, pretty much, a children's book. that is not a bad thing and it doesn't mean you can't make a movie for both adults and children from it. What it does mean is you have to make a choice about tone. You can go with the slapstick approach to violence and combat, or you can go for visceral and bloody fighting but you can't have bits of both and expect your film to feel coherent. You can have the dark and brooding menace of lingering shadows on the horizon and tales of kingdoms that have been wronged for generations and you can have jokes about how the fat dwarves love to eat, but you've got to strike an appropriate balance. The comic relief of Legolas and Gimli worked in the LotR trilogy because it was just that: comic relief between all the heavy stuff. In TH:AUJ it's kind of laid on a little too much and a little too thick.

I do hope that Jackson slightly readdresses this balance in favour of one way or the other for The Desolation of Smaug (which, by the way should be pronounced Smorg and not Smowg as this illiterate adaptation calls him) but it shouldn't take much. It's not offensively bad at all. If anything I just can't wait to see Benedict Cumberbatch playing a dragon.


Contact
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I am a massive nerd. Especially over space and astronomy. As such, Carl Sagan is one of those people who I look to as an example of the best humanity had to offer. A brilliant scientist and a brilliant man, Sagan devoted his life to both learning and teaching about the cosmos and dedicated a notable amount of his work to the idea of humanity's first contact with other intelligent life. In that thread he wrote a novel about our first encounter, and based on that, we got Contact.

This is proper sci-fi. None of that Star trek or Star Wars bollocks where it's just soap-operas-in-space or Tolkien-in-space; but fiction grounded in science that's thought provoking and not just a succession of action sequences. Contact takes on a lot in terms of its message. It's a film about science and religion at heart, and thankfully it's not science vs religion for once. Go to any corner of the internet, no matter what the supposed topic of discussion is, and spend enough time there and you'll find people branding themselves as atheists and trying to tear the religious peoples a new one because they're "illogical". But science and faith aren't completely incompatible, and it takes a writer and a director as nuanced and empathetic as Carl Sagan and Robert Zemeckis respectively to get it right.

It's refreshing, as somewhat of an agnostic myself, to see something that gets to the heart of what both science and religion are about: finding and discovering truth. The message advocated here is that an unwavering extremist belief in either way on the existence of a god or higher power is ultimately damaging.

Jodie Foster kills it as the lead character; Dr Ellie Arroway is the determined but often cast into the background scientist who discovers the first radio message originating from life outside our solar system. As time goes on and she and her team decode the message it becomes clear that they are on the verge of making first real contact with what could be an intelligent alien species.

Many slated the film claiming it lacks payoff in the final act of its 2h30 runtime, but these people obviously miss the message and don't appreciate the beauty and significance of the scene they got instead of the one they wanted. With a visually stunning and emotionally moving closing act, I think Contact pays off in a way that many science fiction films can only achieve if they use a round of explosions and crazy monsters, but none are necessary here.

Safety Not Guaranteed
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A film based off a gag advert that only appeared to fill space in a magazine back in 1997. That ad on the poster? It was actually in a paper, and they made a movie about it.

See, now I know that sounds a bit sh*t, to extrapolate a movie out of 5 lines of text in a 15 year old newspaper, but it's really not.

This isn't a sci-fi or time travel film really. The premise is that Darius (Aubrey Plaza) and another intern working at a magazine are taken on an assignment by staff writer Jeff (Jake Johnson [Nick off of New Girl]) after he saw the ad in the paper. Their task is to find out just what kind of crazy this guy is and hopefully get an interesting article out of it. The trio set off to a seaside town and eventually track down Kenneth (Mark Duplass), who took out the ad. As they investigate, Darius becomes quite involved with Kenneth and his reasons for wanting to go back in time, and they start to doubt the extent of his insanity.

Make no mistake, Safety Not Guaranteed is your standard quirky comedy drama. It's a miracle that, with Jake Johnson already there, that Zooey Deschanel didn't come in and ruin the part of Darius, seeing as she's the postergirl for quirky indie-style films. Aubrey Plaza was a much better choice; she's got a subtle edge to her that makes Darius endearingly sweet while still capable of harsh wit. The sweetness works well in the developing relationship between her and the would-be time traveller and the wit bounces off Johnson's jaded older writer to create a hilarious back and forth dynamic between the two.

There's nothing incredibly deep about Safety Not Guaranteed, but it's a heartfelt comedy/drama with buckets of charm and great dialogue. I'd like to be able to say I didn't like how the ending went, if I'd written it the last five minutes would play out very differently, but I can't argue with the massive grin that I had spread across my face as the credits started to roll. If comparisons are worth anything, it's very similar to Seeking a Friend for the End of the World.

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#2229

Posted 04 February 2013 - 03:29 AM Edited by ThePinkFloydSound, 04 February 2013 - 06:59 PM.

I did Safety Not Garanteed on the last page. icon14.gif

Last couple of films I watched were Death Proof and Animal Kingdom. Death Proof was disappointing to me as my friend said it was his all time favourite film (he's not a buff but can appreciate a good film) and also someone here posted about it, think it was Indi. So I was looking forward to it on their recommendations. It's definitely Tarantinos worst, in my opinion. Apart from the nod to grind-house or retro films it does little to have a modern twist or give more substance than the novelty of it being a throwback film. The dialogues were boring. I didn't connect with any characters. I rarely found the characters likeable in any way other than the fact I'd bash most of them with my cock especially the cheerleader. The girl that looked like Scary Spice I suppose was a satire on the token black person. She kept saying cliched nigga-isms throughout. She was like a kid doing impressions of her dad or something only she wasn't a kid, she was a grown woman. The story or lacktherof was a little pants too. I didn't really want these chicks to succeed. Listening to them babble on made me want to murder them myself. You'd think if you want the victims to fail you might have some love for the attacker? No. Kurt Russell is cool but he doesn't have a personality in this. There wasn't anything to like about him.

I rarely don't like a film. Really. Well there's loads I wont/dont like and this film seems to have all the things I'd like in a film but I didn't like it. So, sorry if I offend people that did enjoy it. ph34r.gif

ANIMAL KINGDOM, 2010

A film I did enjoy was Animal Kingdom. It's got the surprisingly great score of 97% from critics on Rotten Tomatoes (don't see many with such a high critic rating) and it was rated about 146 times. I'm not going to say much about this film. I'd just highly recommend it. It has some of the themes of Snowtown - a family member getting sucked in to family 'business' against his will. As the title, it's an Animal Kingdom is this dysfunctional family and elders have to protect the young but if they can't protect the young, the young must fend for themselves. I don't know why I didn't see this film sooner. It was nominated for 5 Oscars.

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#2230

Posted 04 February 2013 - 05:44 AM

I just watched Babel, EXCELLENT movie, honestly the best movie I've ever seen.

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#2231

Posted 04 February 2013 - 01:16 PM

Yesterday I watched Boogie Nights for he first time.
It’s a very well made movie about the rise and fall of a young porn star in the late seventies/early eighties in the San Fernando Valley.
The story is very complex and intense. Decorated with a lot of likeable characters and a brilliant soundtrack, I think it is a very pleasant entertainment.
It furthermore broaches the issue the recurring conservatism and prudery in the early eighties US, the negative impact of drug consumption and the omnipresence of violence.

Also notable: Many songs from the soundtrack are featured in GTA: Vice City and San Andreas. smile.gif

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Johnny Playert
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#2232

Posted 05 February 2013 - 12:26 AM

You guys know what it's like, right...?
To have the pleasure of finally getting around to that epic movie everybody has seen 100 times but you just didn't have... until now.





What i'm talking about, is...

The Usual Suspects


Jesus-H-Christ what a great flick.
I know it won't be everybody's cup of tea but this one is brilliant. The whole atmosphere of it is just the best.
These pure-bred criminals and scheisters create a setting that's very similar to Heat but in a very different way. I won't be able to discuss it much but it all starts with 5 criminals put together in a jail cel on a bullsh*t investigation, but in the meantime decide to plan a bad-ass robbery. After that they get swallowed up in deeper sh*t they could ever imagine. Keyser Söze.

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So... if you've also never seen it, go do so right now. It's right up there with Pulp Fiction and Reservoir Dogs if you ask me.
Just make sure you pay proper attention. Things can go fast.

http://www.imdb.com/...4814/?ref_=sr_1

It even has a young 'Gus Fring' (Breaking Bad) in it lmao








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GTA-King
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#2233

Posted 05 February 2013 - 12:38 AM Edited by GTA-King, 05 February 2013 - 12:45 AM.

^ Dude, that is f*cking crazy. I was going to recommend that movie to you the other night when we was on PSN. mercie_blink.gif

Great movie though. I love the twist at the end. icon14.gif

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#2234

Posted 05 February 2013 - 12:44 AM

LMFAO that's insane biggrin.gif
I kept being reminded of this one and today i just decided to get it. Wanted to see the first 5 minutes to get the feel of it, but never stopped watching smile.gif It's f*cking great.

Yeah, nice twist. Just when you think you got it...

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#2235

Posted 06 February 2013 - 02:25 AM Edited by I So Brink, 06 February 2013 - 02:27 AM.

The search system on this forum is a bitch, so it was pretty difficult to find out if there had been any previous discussion about...

V/H/S
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V/H/S sounds like something that's becoming all the more common these days: a found-footage horror film. Yes, one-hundred percent of the film comes from tapes that were made by people who had something horrible happen to them. Yes, there is a lot of shaky cam, and yes it is presented as a bunch of people going through these tapes as the frame of the story. But V/H/S just uses the idea of some guys looking through tapes to give you an anthology of a number of different short horror films. It's less a film and more a collection of these short films. They're all created by different crews and different directors so it's a real assortment meaning there's bound to be at least one film that even the most cynical horror fan can at least appreciate.

The plot's built around the idea that a bunch of awful guys who make money by filming, frankly, things that are clearly minor sexual assaults on women and selling them as weird porn voyeuristic. They're then offered by an unseen partner an opportunity to make some "real money" by continuing their scumbaggery by breaking into the house of an old man. Their mission is to retrieve an old VHS tape, and they'll "know it when they see it". The only trouble being, when they arrive at the house the old guy is dead in his chair and there are mounds of unlabelled VHS tapes littering the house, so obviously they have to watch them to find what they're looking for and BAM! we have our movie.

The tapes that they manage to get through, before whatever killed the dead guy gets to work on them too, are:

Amateur Night
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Shot in a first-person, point-of-view style this is the story of three skeezy scumbags who conceal a hidden, yet somehow still HD, camera in a pair of glasses and go out on the town to pick up some girls. The aim is to take them back to their motel room and secretly film some amateur porn. Karma, and then some, comes around and bites the boys in the arse when one of the girls turns out to have a little more appetite than they anticipated.

If you don't mind bloody violence with sexual overtones (i.e. it's not "sexual-violence" but it is very violent and a lot of flesh on show), then this short should entertain. In keeping with the rest of the film the effects are slick while obviously low budget. Despite the main body of the short being done in am apparently seamless one take, the make up and effects are naturalisticly applied and it makes for a very visceral and genuinely frightening fate for these three scumbags.

Second Honeymoon
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More traditionally shot for the found footage genre, this is the record a couple make of their second honeymoon. Complete with shots in the mirror to establish that yes, the people in the action were the ones who recorded it, it's quite standard in that way. The couple's encounter with a strange, possibly high young woman looking for a ride to nowhere in particular sets the two on edge. The tension is built beautifully in this short; once the sun goes down on the first night things get creepy real fast. Through a masterful use of ambient sound the amount of tension had my heart going 1 hundred miles an hour despite the fact that nothing completely horrific occurred. Once the real action begins it goes crazy for a short burst and culminates in an ending that I personally did not see coming, although I might just be simple.

Tuesday The 17th
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Kids go on a camping trip in the woods, hoping to take drugs, have sex and film all these escapades. It's almost as if they want something to come and make them stars of a slasher flick, Cabin in the Woods style.

If you've ever watched the webseries Marble Hornets, this short makes use of a lot of the same techniques and style to create its suspense. Camera distortion caused by the villain plays a big part in crafting the "monster" of this short. Playing on the idea of only showing glimpses of the villain and never the full form, using the camera malfunctions allows it to be fully in frame but still largely unseen. Throw that up with the handheld camera and a lot of running through the woods and there's a general sense of unease about just what these kids are up against that only really works in short bouts of exposure, which is why it works so well here.

The Sick Thing That Happened To Emily When She Was Younger
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Paranormal Activity meets Skype. A woman and her long distance, doctor-in-training boyfriend have a series of recorded webchats that document her worries about her apartment being haunted. Some tense moments that aren't justly reward with real scares. The conclusion comes right out of left field. I don't mean that in the sense of "Wow! What a twist!" but more of an "Erm... okay?" sort of reaction.

The concept could have lead to something pretty great, but I'm pretty sure the director of this one thought he had to go with the off-the-wall and totally unsolicited twist just to differentiate it from something like Paranormal Activity. I'd say he was wrong to do so as well, some of the best results in film come from a new person echoing someone else's work and just doing a better job of it.

10/31/98
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The haunted house flick. A group of friends set off to a Halloween party at a house none of them have ever been to before. After arriving early to find nobody there, they go to have a look around and discover that maybe they've not gone to the right place after all.

Nowhere near as out there as the others, but well executed nonetheless. the amount of effort obviously poured into the effects especially shines through. The house is constantly shifting, if only slightly, and perceptions are messed with the minute the gang step across the threshold. The story continues past the boundaries of the normal haunted house fare and rounds the film off with an ending that, while not totally unexpected, wasn't the sort I thought I was going to get.

----

The weakest part of V/H/S is easily the framing story. The reason we get to see all these shorts doesn't really matter, and although it is it's own little horror story spread across the gaps between tapes, I found myself just not caring what happened in it at all, I just wanted the next tape. It night be down to the characters being complete arseholes, but even then I should have at least been entertained by their ultimate fate but I just wasn't. This could've worked just as effectively if it was, say, some kids at a sleepover who found this really old box of tapes in the loft or something.

But regardless, the rest of the movie is fantastic. There really is something for everyone here. Each film fits into a "type" of horror movie, but that's not to say they're just paint-by-numbers pieces where you know exactly what's going to happen. One thing that seems to run through all the films is a refreshing take on who gets "punished" by the horror genre. Particularly in reference to women: in traditional horror films, the girl who is stereotyped as promiscuous, or "the slut", is killed just for being that, a fact that betrays the misogyny hidden in a lot of (particularly older) horror films. But here, women aren't punished for being sexualised or for being chaste. In fact it's usually (although there's a notable exception) those who try to exploit women sexually who get punished. Hell, in one film unwanted sexual contact prompts the victim to turn into a blood thirsty beast. That particular point may not be the best example, but on a whole the collection seems to have much more healthy attitudes to what is deserving of punishment by horror film staples (again, with that one notable exception) than most films in the genre.

Surprisingly too, the films all feel very coherent. They're all made by different directors, tackling different sub-genres but they all fit together in an eclectic sort of way. Whoever was running the whole show (the credits list is quite difficult to decipher, with so many names) must have been very careful to let the directors have free reign over what it was they were making, but to keep it consistent with the whole feel of the production.

V/H/S is a great compilation piece. Although the found-footage genre of horror films is definitely starting to wear thin these days, the short bursts and different approaches to it make the film feel fresh throughout. Compilation movies can tend to go either way and either be very impressive or complete failures, much like Movie 43 is being tried as at the moment. V/H/S is certainly the former, and something any fan of horror should check out. If they have the stomach for a lot of gore. It's not excessive or gratuitous, but there is a lot of blood and guts.

Mister Pink
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#2236

Posted 06 February 2013 - 12:13 PM

Great to see so much activity in this topic. Keep them coming guys.

Yeah I think I wrote a few lines on V/H/S a page or 2 back. I hate that genre normally but I found it genuinely spooky and different to the rest. I'm a sucker for handheld crappy footage in films, I always find the things more realistic when shot like that most of the time. Like that film The Idiots.

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#2237

Posted 06 February 2013 - 03:45 PM

Yeah, it certainly ahd its share of creepy and scary moments. V/H/S was the first horror film since Martyrs (which I watched a good few years ago now) to actually give me trouble sleeping. The Succubus demon in the first short really put the sh*ts up me for some reason. That was easily my favourite one: great use of effects, the actress was brilliantly cast with those huge eyes and her voice when repeating "I like you" really worked well even before all the stuff that required serious SFX work came into play. The bit where she repeats it when he's hurt his leg and she has him cornered in the stairwell really sent shivers through me. I swear I heard someone whisper that line just as I got into bed and didn't sleep for another half hour.

The rest of them don't eaxctly live up to the way it kicked off with that, but the second and last ones come close. The scene in the second one where the mystery girl has broken in and is using the camera was ridiculously tense, and having the "monster" of that story take control of the camera gave it a real sense of uneasy violation. Not to mention how brutal the events of the second night are. That stabbing really shook me up, especially as there's little build up and it just starts at a crazy pace and doesn't let up 'til it's done. It was nice to have something that wasn't supernatural at one point too, personally I would've put that entry later on in the film just because of that, but it's not exactly a major thing.

The last one was the "notable exception" I was banging on about. When it got to the meat of its plot (rescuing the girl they thought was about to be sacrificed) I thought we were going to be rewarded for going through the 1hr45m of watching bastards getting what they deserve, with innocents sacrificed along the way, by seeing some decent people being rewarded for doing the right thing. But nope, what we got was a train wreck killing the only "good" protagonists in the entire plot. I mean, I like having my expectations played with, but that left a bit of a bitter taste in my mouth.

69_black_69
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#2238

Posted 06 February 2013 - 05:41 PM

Just watched Silent Hill Revelation.

Well, it's not as bad as i thought it would be. Looking good actually, even if there's so much differences from the game. One thing that bother me is how the villain is easily killed. So here's how it goes, a villain appeared, and one minute later, he/she died.
I mean, WTF! there's nothing memorable about the story in this movie. It needs more action, and more monster.

It's still enjoyable, especially Adelaide Clemens ( she's looking hot).
I give it a 6.5/10.

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#2239

Posted 08 February 2013 - 11:08 PM Edited by Valenta, 03 June 2013 - 03:42 PM.

The last film I have seen fully is:

user posted image

user posted image

Until now, you've never really seen the world you live in.
Koyaanisqatsi

I remember first seeing this for the first time around 2 years ago and my god, it didn't half blow me away. When the first notes of music rang out from my headphones, I was completely entranced by them, unable to move or speak. The visuals were, for lack of a better word, mind-blowing, the shot above in particular sending shivers up my spine upon seeing the film a second time. My favourite segment by far is the one known as "The Grid". The editing, the music, the expert use of time-lapse photography all come together for one of the greatest sequences ever made (in my humble opinion).

You really need to see it for yourself (If you haven't already). I can't tell how much this movie has changed me and my music preference.

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#2240

Posted 08 February 2013 - 11:17 PM Edited by Gareth Croke, 08 February 2013 - 11:51 PM.

I'm guessing by the HUGE picture and description (which don't mention the film) you mean Koyaanisqatsi, which yes it is marvel and is the best of the trilogy. I still await the remastering of the film into HD.

ED: You have now, you sneaky so'n'so.

Wolf of Badenoch
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#2241

Posted 08 February 2013 - 11:39 PM

QUOTE
I still await the remastering of the film into HD


I think it has been already, courtesy of The Criterion Collection:

http://www.criterion...4-koyaanisqatsi

Granted, I've yet to see it in any stores in Glasgow.

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#2242

Posted 08 February 2013 - 11:48 PM

Ahh, so they've finally released it, granted I've not looked for a few months and that seems to be December just gone, I'll have to consider this one now. I'll also have to consider a blu-ray player as well confused.gif

69_black_69
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#2243

Posted 09 February 2013 - 05:50 PM

Umm just saying thank you here for the review of Safety Not Guaranteed.
I've watched it and it was awesome. icon14.gif

Brobinski
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#2244

Posted 09 February 2013 - 08:51 PM

QUOTE (69_black_69 @ Saturday, Feb 9 2013, 17:50)
Umm just saying thank you here for the review of Safety Not Guaranteed.
I've watched it and it was awesome. icon14.gif

That's good to hear. I really enjoyed it too. I'd not seen Aubrey Plaza in anything before, but I hear she plays a similar character in Parks and Recreation (a sitcom), so I might have to check that out soon 'cos she was great in SNG.

Anyway, I watched Kill List the other day and I'm not quite sure how I feel about it...

Kill List
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Just going to be honest and throw my hands up: I'm not sure I "got" Kill List.

It's very much an arthouse horror/thriller film. Jay is a former soldier, as are his wife and best friend-come-business-partner, and he's been out of work for nearly a year after something went horribly wrong on his last job in Kiev. His last job as a contract killer, that is.

Thrust back into the world of hired murder by money worries, his wife's nagging and his friend's encouragement to "get back on the horse", things start to get a little strange as the pair make their way through the list of targets. And don't you worry, you see every second of them making their way through the targets. Kill List is a violent film. It's few and relatively far between, but when the time for violence comes it comes with no apologies. There's one particular scene that hammers it home; we've been so conditioned by tv and film to expect a cutaway at certain moments of violence in film, to sanitise the experience and spare the viewer the real horror of it, that it comes as a real shock when the camera just keeps rolling. You'll definitely know which scene I mean when you see it.

Kill List doesn't answer a lot of the questions it sets up. Not exactly at least. There's a lot of puzzle pieces that you start to put together once you've stopped reeling from the strange turn of events in the closing act. The pieces don't form a complete picture but it's massively open to interpretation and that's a wonderful thing.

But regardless of whether I "got it" or not (I think I might do now that I've stewed over it for an hour or so), Kill List does a great job with atmosphere. Long exposition scenes at the start build up a brilliantly tangible sense of the secret lives of the new middle class as Jay's occupation and past is gradually revealed. A creeping sense of unease builds gradually through the film, from one or two "What the f*ck was that about?" moments at the start to a succession of occult and strange happenings towards the end. The soundtrack and these moments of unease work seamlessly together to build a brooding sense of increasing darkness as we venture down the rabbit hole of both Jay's messed up psyche and the seedy underworld of killing for unknown figures with unknown motivations, where the killers can be simple pawns or even bigger players than they realise.

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#2245

Posted 10 February 2013 - 06:03 AM

First time heard about Aubrey Plaza is from Scott Pilgrim ( I love everyone in this movie! Best movie of all time IMO ). Yeah she's damn good at SNG, and by checkng her imdb profile, she's will be playing as main actress again in To Do List. I'm sure going to check this one out.

I don't know, there's something good about Safety Not Guaranteed, that makes me sucked into the story. And that's cool! For me it's 8/10.
Totally recommended. icon14.gif

Though that most people at my country seems didn't like this kind of movie ( i'm discussing this movie at a local forum). They said it has a boring acting and dialog, and there's nothing sci-fi about this movie.
I was like WTF? People in my country are mostly dumb! They like Twilight series, but not this? because i'm pretty sure that this movie is 100% better love story than Twilight.

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#2246

Posted 12 February 2013 - 01:34 AM

Silver Linings Playbook
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It's probably an affront to my manhood how much I enjoyed Silver Linings Playbook, and that's coming from someone whose list of favourite films includes Eternal Sunshine, Garden State and Lost in Translation. I'm in pretty good company though, seeing as it's currently sat at 92% on RottenTomatoes.com (82% among top critics) and has eight Academy Awards nominations, one of which it could easily be in for.

The bulk of the film is standard rom-com fare, but it's done very, very well. The edge comes from director and screenwriter David O. Russell's willingness to play with touchy subjects like mental illness, family troubles and death to produce comedy. The film doesn't make light of those things, but accepts that funny things can happen in those situations, much like how 50/50 masterfully wove comedy into the touching story of a battle with cancer. The story revolves around two messed up people, who are surrounded by people who are just as messed up but in more socially acceptable ways.

Pat (Bradley Cooper) has recently been released after an 8 month stint in a psychiatric hospital following an incident involving his wife that resulted in a restraining order and the stay in the hospital. He is recovering and trying to "fix" himself for his wife when he meets Tiffany (Jennifer Lawrence), who herself has recently lost her husband, who he thinks can help him get his wife back.

Praise needs to go to the supporting cast, including Robert DeNiro as Pat's compassionate yet OCD riddled father, John Ortiz as Pat's friend who struggles through every day of his marriage and Chris Tucker as Pat's lovable but manic friend Danny, who he met in the hospital. But the real praise needs to be reserved for the two leads. Bradley Cooper does an outstanding job of giving life to Pat and portraying both sides of his bipolar disorder with tact and authenticity. The enthusiastic rambling and lack of a verbal filter in his ups and the anger and restlessness in his downs are equally as touching and given their due attentions without defining the Pat simply as his illness. It's his passion for his new "silver linings" outlook and his determination to do right by the people he loves are what defines him. If there's anything that tops Bradley Cooper in this film, it's Jennifer Lawrence. Tiffany is for once, a more complex character for a rom-com. She's really messed up, thanks in no small part to how she lost her husband and her lack of support in dealing with it, but seems okay with this and accepts it as who she is. It's the confidence that comes from the self-awareness, with only a few lapses into vulnerability, that endears Tiffany to the audience. Jennifer Lawrence gives a frankly amazing performance in Silver Linings; with brilliant comedic timing, an ear for the perfect voice for the character and pure acting talent, Jennifer Lawrence seizes the title of best young actress in Hollywood with this film, for me at least. Personally, it's a two horse race between Lawrence and Chastain for Best Actress this year, but what do I know?

It might not be bouncing off or subverting all the usual tropes of the Rom Com genre, but Silver Linings, with its polished script, shining performances and sterling devotion to telling a genuine love story, delivers on all fronts.

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#2247

Posted 12 February 2013 - 06:32 PM

Sounds good! ^

I watched another bunch of films. More notable ones were We Need To Talk About Kevin, The Life Aquatic and The Squid And The Whale.

I had seen The Life Aquatic when it came out originally but upon my second watching, I enjoyed it a little more. I'd only complain that it's a little long for the type of film it is. Anderson did such a fine job with this film. I love the colour palette, the reds the blues and the beige sort of colours throughout. The set made for the boat is just fantastic and the humour can be good. There are a couple of great scenes that go from one room to the next on the boat and there are some awesome all-in-one-shot scenes.

The Squid and The Whale was decent too. I kept meaning to see it for a long time. If you like comedy-dramas or however you like to label them you might like this. I enjoy films that explore relationships in families especially how we learn from our parents and our surroundings and adapt.

The film that still has me thinking is...

We Need To Talk About Kevin
.

It's a very disturbing film. The timeline isn't linear like most films but it's not a head-f*ck. It's more for contrast. It's more like it's showing you a person at a crossroads or even a place in their life and then they show you how someone would get there. The film is about a mother raising a child that has serious sociopathic traits growing up. The mother is almost incapable of loving the child. But the child seems to only display these sociopathic signs in the mothers presence and not the father. Almost like the kid is playing games with the mother to f*ck with her head. It's one of those films that made me feel a little guilty for being a little sh*t as a kid. There's nowhere for the parents to turn to. I'm not going to give any more storyline away. I'm always terrible at expressing myself in words about a film I've watched.. reasons I chased photography in life! tounge.gif All I can say is the film has superb acting, it's shot really nicely and is quite disturbing. It sort of crosses genres between Drama and Horror. Definitely a film to watch. Visually it's amazing and the use of audio in the film is frightening.

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#2248

Posted 15 February 2013 - 02:37 AM

QUOTE (ThePinkFloydSound @ Tuesday, Feb 12 2013, 14:32)
Silver Linings Playbook

Sounds good! ^

It is good. I am biased since I'm a Philadelphia born and bread Eagles fan. Unless you live it, it may be hard to explain. tounge2.gif
Honestly though, my wife and I don't do romcom or any real sap. We were concerned going into this movie and willing to ditch it quick if it was 'too much' for us. Local bias aside, I think they did a great job on the film.


















Last Night:
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Great Hughes movie. One of the funniest of that genera if you ask me. The one thing I often like to point out about these 80's movies is the fact that the party sequences are not really that exaggerated.

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#2249

Posted 15 February 2013 - 11:58 PM

Haven't seen that many Hughes movies, but was Molly Ringwald in, like, all of them? Haha. They all seem to be very much products of their era, so I kind of think you might have to have been around at the time to properly "get" it. That said, I'm a child of the 90s ('92 representin') and Ferris Bueller's Day Off is one of the best films I've watched in the past year or so.

Anyways...

I was put on to this by our very own Tyler:
Seven Psychopaths
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(I actually like this poster better as a work of art, but it's actually a terrible advert for the film)


As Martin McDonagh's follow-up to In Bruges, Seven Psychopaths hits a lot of the same black-comedy style notes and takes a similar number of darkly emotional turns along the way.

It's a bit of a filmmaker's film. There's a lot of playing off crime and action movie clichés and the plot is literally about a Marty (Colin Farrell), a screenwriter who's struggling to write a script titled "Seven Psychopaths". They are literally writing the movie in the movie. The meat of it though lies in that, while struggling with the script, Marty inadvertently ends up involved in a friend's (Sam Rockwell) business venture. And when I say "business venture", I mean the business of kidnapping dogs in LA and returning them when a reward is offered. Of course, these dognapping psychopaths eventually run afoul of another psychopath when they steal the beloved shihtzu of a mafia boss (Woody Harrelson) and he ain't paying to get it back.

Packed with bloody punchlines and genuinely messed up people (who may or may not be psychopaths) the film finds a lot of its wit in the darker realms of comedy. It gets a little goofy at times but the performances really sell it: Sam Rockwell and Colin Farrell make a wonderful odd couple, with the former playing the manic go-getter and the latter filling the cynical, Irish writer who (stereotypically) has a drinking problem. With Christopher Walken by their side and a host side characters who only occasionally clock how crazy the main cast are, the ensemble works to hit every black beat at the heart of the film.

A tight script that ends with some emotional moments to back up the laughs, Seven Psychopaths doesn't quite feel as tight and neat as Mcdonagh's last foray onto the big screen but it most certainly works. In Bruges was a very tight story involving some three very well written characters. But Seven Psychopaths is more of a smorgasbord of interesting characters with a slightly less coherent reason for them all to run into each other, but it works well enough, especially in the context of the satirical points the movie makes about movie plots anyway.

You don't have to be a movie nerd to appreciate the hilarity of Psychopaths, but those who are will enjoy it that little bit more.

Trick 'R Treat
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It may be because I'm not as well versed in horror film history as many people seem to be, but I just don't get all the hype that this film received. Rotten Tomatoes averages out its critics' review at 85% (a really good score) and horror speciality websites across the internet gave it 5s and 10s. Often hailed as a tribute to classic horror films, it just comes across as cliched to me.

Like I said, it might be because I haven't invested myself in horror classics of the late 70s to the early 90s, but this feels less like a tribute and more just a succession of cliches, complete with predictable "twists", if they can even be called that at this stage.

Something that's less traditional about TrT is the way it's presented. It's not exactly one film, but an anthology of sorts. It's Halloween in Ohio and one town that really gets into the spirit of the holiday seems to attract spirits all its own in the holiday. The four interwoven stories that fill the hour and a half of TrT have some promising moments. If you can take anything from some of my previous reviews, especially the horror ones, it's that the way female characters are treated and written is something that interests me. Frankly, the only really interesting story in TrT is the one that deals with a group of young women all on the hunt for a date for a party they're headed to. The way this story plays with expectations was the only time that the film presented something actually original, and even this is something that's been done very similarly many times before.

If you're into classic horror films (say Nightmare on Elm Street, the original Friday the 13th, that sort of stuff) then you might enjoy Trick 'R Treat, but chances are if you've enjoyed anything that's been brought to the genre in the last ten years or so (V/H/S, Cabin in the Woods, Scream, Saw, American Psycho) you might just find Trick 'R Treat a little bit archaic.

Mister Pink
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#2250

Posted 16 February 2013 - 02:21 AM

QUOTE (I So Brink @ Saturday, Feb 16 2013, 00:58)
Anyways...

As Martin McDonagh's follow-up to In Bruges, Seven Psychopaths ..........


I made a topic about Martin McDonagh (probably not deserved of an individual topic) and I included this film. It's a McDonagh short with Brendan Gleeson. I'm not sure where you are from but I hope you understand the accent. I love this film. It's pure McDonagh.





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