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The New Guitar Topic

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mr quick
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#1921

Posted 24 September 2016 - 09:38 PM

Eh, seems like a perfectly mediocre gimmick for the perfectly mediocre afterparty player who doesn't mind the loss of resonance that comes with gluing a hideous midi controller on their flat top :p 

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El Diablo
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#1922

Posted 25 September 2016 - 06:51 PM

that was my initial impression, too.

but what if you were someone who plays like Andy McKee? and this is already your style?

 

Spoiler

 

I can imagine that - in the right hands - it could produce some pretty intriguing soundscapes.

yeah? no?

 

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mr quick
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#1923

Posted 25 September 2016 - 07:27 PM Edited by Marwin, 25 September 2016 - 07:27 PM.

Yeah, you make a fair point. I'm not entirely sold on it because of how it might limit the sonic possibilities of a good guitar, but in the right hands it might be interesting. But then,  the guitar might not be as focal... I'd rather be a duo  :lol:

 

 

e: a word.


El Diablo
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#1924

Posted 25 September 2016 - 07:35 PM

yeah the only real problem I have with it is that it empowers the 'one-man band' concept, which is what everyone is trying to do nowadays with their loop pedals and cross mixing their own playing / vocals on different instruments. which is fine and all. but I'm too old fashioned for that. I want to see multiple people coming together and playing live; working off of each other and creating something in the moment.

 

I want to play with a separate drum and bassist, not just tap my own drum and bass midi notes.

like I think the ACPAD is pretty cool if you just don't have anyone to play with and you're dicking around on your own arrangements at least.

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evh5150vanhalen
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#1925

Posted 05 October 2016 - 09:22 PM

3A527780-809B-41ED-AE61-948037279B9D.jpg

Finally got these put on.
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The_Shape_
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#1926

Posted 06 October 2016 - 08:20 PM

My favorite guitar player is Jimi Hendrix. I also like SRV, Robin Trower, Mick Ronson, Jimmy Page, Eric Clapton, David Gilmour, Mike McCready, George Harrison, John Lennon, and many others.

Guitars: Gibson SG Standard, Epiphone G400 1966 Reissue, Japanese Fender Stratocaster, Jimi Hendrix Voodoo Stratocaster, Lefty Fender Strat converted for right hand playing, Samick acoustic.

Amps: Marshall YJM100, Marshall TSL60, Peavey Vypyr 15.

Cabs: Marshall 1960ahw, Carvin Valvemaster cab.

Gear I want: I've been looking at getting a Vox AC30 head.

bloatedsack
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#1927

Posted 05 November 2016 - 02:39 AM

QSNAaCg.jpg

 

Goodbye, Muff; hello Carcosa. Been watching for a Pharaoh or Team Awesome, but I couldn't pass up 20% off and free shipping plus it's the darling of the Internet, this week.

 

Now, the chaos of trying to figure where to put a single pedal into a stereo input chain. Currently one pup goes to a DOD250 and then wah, other goes to a Holy Fire OD, then muff, then everything gets summed together and sent to amp.

 

I think this replaces both HF and Muff, but I need to see what stacking does.

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El Diablo
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#1928

Posted 12 November 2016 - 09:38 PM

bought a used Strat.

I think this is stringed instrument #9 in the collection; guitar #4.

 

ifKJX5P.jpg?1

 

tsX8x1F.jpg

 

d4vStNz.jpg

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mr quick
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#1929

Posted 12 November 2016 - 09:55 PM

Very nice, man! Cool with the pearloid pickguard :) What version is this? How does it play/how's the neck? GIVE ME INFORMATION

 

Been having some really ugly trouble with overtones lately as I discovered during a practice session(exerpt, the moment at which I realized it): 

https://soundcloud.c...-overtone-issue

 

I've attached some foam(using steel wire) between the TP and bridge, but haven't gotten to try it amped yet. 

I took the guitar to the store where I bought it(which is also my workplace now hehe) and the technician who himself had planned to buy it remarked that it sounded "unfocused" compared to when it was new. The only real change of course has been the 011 flats, but the issue is most present in the unwound strings, which aren't all that different from the 010's with which it shipped. I'm not sure how to fix this without drastically changing the sound of the guitar :/

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bloatedsack
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#1930

Posted 13 November 2016 - 12:56 AM

It's what flatwounds do. I don't know why people would choose flats for a sixer, but it's your taste, not mine.

 

I assume the metal content for an "unwound flat" must be somewhat different than a "unwound round," which is how you manage to pull that dead sound into winky little guitar strings.

 

My only other suggestion is the nonsensical response of witness the strings, push down hard on either side where they cross the nut and whatever bridge or saddles or tailpeice you'e got on the other end. I, personally, think it's BS but lots of people I've spoken with swear by it.

 

OTOH, I run, uhm, 45s? Well, technically 65s since I don't use the G.


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#1931

Posted 15 November 2016 - 08:20 AM Edited by El Diablo, 15 November 2016 - 08:23 AM.

Very nice, man! Cool with the pearloid pickguard :) What version is this? How does it play/how's the neck? GIVE ME INFORMATION

I believe it's one of the Mexican made Strats from the 80s.

neck feels silky smooth and the fret plays easy. it's not quite as super-buttery smooth as the PRS, but the fret and the strings definitely play as well. very solid. takes a blues beating, then still plays metal in tune, or kicks into a clean funk without twanging or buzzing. PRS is still king at the moment. maybe I'll try to record a short clip of it this week. I'm really enjoying it.

 

but now that I bought this thing I'm about to commence a short shopping spree.

I'm itching to update the amp. bored with the Yamaha. looking at some vintage Vox ACs. warm tubes. having the Strat makes me want to go and get a Telecaster soon next.


mr quick
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#1932

Posted 23 November 2016 - 09:30 PM Edited by Marwin, 23 November 2016 - 09:33 PM.

It's what flatwounds do. I don't know why people would choose flats for a sixer, but it's your taste, not mine.

 

I assume the metal content for an "unwound flat" must be somewhat different than a "unwound round," which is how you manage to pull that dead sound into winky little guitar strings.

 

 

 

That's what was so strange about it, the high E was an Elixir 011. 

(Unrelated re: string choice: I dig the feel of flats and the lack of string noise.) 

 

...so I took my amp downstairs to side-by-side it with my father's identical amp. Plugged in my favorite pedal (Wampler Ecstasy Overdrive). There was no problem. Tried the SY-300 for multi-effects. No problem. 

 

Turns out that there must be something whack about where I'd placed the amp. Not sure what, though. Guess I'll try putting it somewhere else :p

 

 

 

Very nice, man! Cool with the pearloid pickguard :) What version is this? How does it play/how's the neck? GIVE ME INFORMATION

I believe it's one of the Mexican made Strats from the 80s.

neck feels silky smooth and the fret plays easy. it's not quite as super-buttery smooth as the PRS, but the fret and the strings definitely play as well. very solid. takes a blues beating, then still plays metal in tune, or kicks into a clean funk without twanging or buzzing. PRS is still king at the moment. maybe I'll try to record a short clip of it this week. I'm really enjoying it.

 

but now that I bought this thing I'm about to commence a short shopping spree.

I'm itching to update the amp. bored with the Yamaha. looking at some vintage Vox ACs. warm tubes. having the Strat makes me want to go and get a Telecaster soon next.

 

 

The Vox AC combos seems to be very popular among the blues crowd, at least here. John Scofield swears by the vintage ones. 

If vintage ones are hard to come by, I've got a new amp I'd really like to recommend:

BassB15C-large.jpg?375ebaa680

 

Fender Bassbreaker 15 Combo. You won't believe me until you try it. I'll take one over a Hot Rod, even. Honest to god, if I end up wanting a new tube amplifier, I'm ordering a Bassbreaker 15. 

2262000000_amp_ctrlpnldtl_001_nr.jpg

The "structure" switch is great fun. I personally prefer it on "mid" to get that dirty breakup without muddying up the sound. Since Fender are breaking away from their usual form with this one, the bass control actually DOES SOMETHING, and the "built-in" distortion is great!  :miranda: It's got an effects loop as well. 

I absolutely adore the Bassbreaker. It's such a solid amplifier. You should really try one if you get a chance to! 

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mr quick
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#1933

Posted 10 January 2017 - 10:23 AM

Cool new series from Ibanez for 2017: "Contemporary Archtop"

AFC151_SRR_12_01_CU_Body_Top.jpg

 

Ebony fretboard & bridge, floating "magic touch-mini" pickup, and a lovely aesthetic. It looks like a mix of an L5 Studio, a Victor Baker, and a D'Aquisto imo. Can't wait to find out more about it, although I hope it's not so wallet-friendly that I end up ordering one. :p 

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Night Machine
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#1934

Posted 12 January 2017 - 04:56 PM Edited by Night Machine, 12 January 2017 - 05:01 PM.

My top inspirations. :cool:

 

Robbin "King" Crosby (Ratt)

Warren DeMartini (Ratt)

Wolf Hoffmann (Accept)

Jorg Fischer (Accept)

Dave Meniketti (Y&T)

George Lynch (Dokken)

Phil Collen (Def Leppard)

Steve Clark (Def Leppard)

Glen Tipton (Judas Priest)

K.K. Downing (Judas Priest)

Dave Murray (Iron Maiden)

Adrian Smith (Iron Maiden)

Mick Mars (Motley Crue)

David Gilmore (Pink Floyd)

Ritchie Blackmore (Deep Purple)

George Thorogood 

Billy Gibbons (ZZ Top)

Joe Perry (Aerosmith) 

Steve Stevens (Billy Idol)

Tom Keifer (Cinderella)

Richie Sambora (Bon Jovi)

Eddie Van Halen

Angus Young (AC/DC) 

Malcolm Young (AC/DC)

Randy Rhoads (Quiet Riot, Ozzy)

Blackie Lawless (Wasp)

Chris Holmes (Wasp)

Slash (Guns N' Roses)

Steve Vai (David Lee Roth)


El Diablo
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#1935

Posted 22 January 2017 - 09:43 PM

merry xmas round 2.

new pedal board with multiple loops. new tube amp with multiple watt outputs to accompany the old Yamaha.

 

bHAbgPI.jpg

 

WZp7KCw.jpg

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Night Machine
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#1936

Posted 27 January 2017 - 02:17 PM

2 of my 3 guitars. :)

 

Gary Kramer Custom - All original

8DVX7UN.jpgfu6e1kU.jpgSchecter Damien Special FR - w/GFS VEH pups

9fTS1BO.jpgMJPM7tt.jpg

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mr quick
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#1937

Posted 4 weeks ago Edited by Marwin, 4 weeks ago.

Word around the block is Larry Coryell just died. From Julian Coryell's Facebook:
 

NEW YORK – Legendary guitarist Larry Coryell died on Sunday, February 19 in New York City. Coryell, 73, passed away in his sleep at his hotel from natural causes. He’d performed his last two shows on Friday and Saturday, February 17 and 18, at the Iridium in New York City.
 

As one of the pioneers of jazz-rock -- perhaps the pioneer in the ears of some (he’s known to many as the Godfather of Fusion) -- Larry Coryell deserves a special place in the history books. He brought what amounted to a nearly alien sensibility to jazz electric guitar playing in the 1960s, a hard-edged, cutting tone, phrasing and note-bending that owed as much to blues, rock and even country as it did to earlier, smoother bop influences.

Yet as a true eclectic, armed with a brilliant technique, he was comfortable in almost every style, covering almost every base from the most decibel-heavy, distortion-laden electric work to the most delicate, soothing, intricate lines on acoustic guitar.

Born in Galveston, Texas on April 2, 1943 Coryell grew up in the Seattle, Washington area where his mother introduced him to the piano at the age of 4. He switched to guitar and played rock music while in his teens. He didn't consider himself good enough to pursue a music career and studied journalism at The University of Washington while simultaneously taking private guitar lessons.

By 1965 he had relocated to New York City and began taking classical guitar lessons which would figure prominently in the later stages of his career. Although citing Chet Atkins and Chuck Berry as early influences he also took cues from jazzmen such as John Coltrane and Wes Montgomery. He was also inspired by the popular music of the day by The Beatles, The Byrds and Bob Dylan and worked diligently to meld both rock and jazz stylings into his technique. This was reflected on his debut recording performance on drummer Chico Hamilton's album The Dealer where he sounded like Chuck Berry at times with his almost distorted "fat" tone.

In 1966 he formed a psychedelic band called The Free Spirits on which he also sang vocals, played the sitar and did most of the composing. Although conceptually the band's music conformed to the psychedelic formula with titles like "Bad News Cat" and" I'm Gonna Be Free" it foreshadowed jazz-rock fusion with more complex soloing by Coryell and sax/flute player Jim Pepper.
However, it wasn't until three years later after apprenticing on albums by vibraphonist Gary Burton and flutist Herbie Mann and gigging with the likes of Jack Bruce and others that Coryell established his multifarious musical voice, releasing two solo albums (Lady Coryell and Coryell) which mixed jazz, classical and rock ingredients.

In late 1969 he recorded Spaces, the album for which he is most noted. It was a guitar blow-out which also included John McLaughlin who was also sitting on the fence between rock and jazz at the time and the cogitative result formed what many aficionados consider to be the embryo from which the fusion jazz movement of the 1970s emerged. It contained insane tempos and fiery guitar exchanges which were often beyond category not to mention some innovating acoustic bass work by Miroslav Vitous and power drumming by Billy Cobham, both of whom were to make contributions to jazz-rock throughout the 70s.

His career as a significant guitar force in the era of late 60s and early 70s music continued to take flight in a time when guitarists such as Eric Clapton, Jeff Beck, Carlos Santana and many other iconic names also blossomed. His varied musical expression took him on a diverse journey, and though he did not receive the level of commercial fame some of his guitarist contemporaries enjoyed, he was still able to make his timeless mark in music through his highly acclaimed solo work (he released well over 60 solo albums), his performances with powerhouse fusion band The Eleventh House and numerous collaborations with a host of jazz greats including of Miles Davis, Gary Burton, Alphonse Mouzon, Ron Carter, Chet Baker and many other noteworthy artists of all styles.

Larry still toured the world right up until his passing and had planned an extensive 2017 summer tour with a reformed The Eleventh House.
His most recent releases are Barefoot Man: Sanpaku, released on October 14, 2016 on Cleopatra Records and an upcoming Eleventh House release, entitled Seven Secrets, which will be released on the Savoy Jazz label on June 2.

His final original works included operas based on Leo Tolstoy's War and Peace, Anna Karenina and James Joyce's Ulysses.

He is survived by his wife, Tracey, his daughter Annie, his sons Murali and Julian, and his daughter Allegra, as well as six grandchildren.

A memorial service is being planned Friday February 24th at the S.G.I-USA Buddhist center at 7 east 15th St. at 7 p.m.





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