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HD DVD Formats and Windows Vista

7 replies to this topic
reticulatingsplines
  • reticulatingsplines

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#1

Posted 05 October 2005 - 06:33 AM

And just when you thought the ongoing format wars over the next generation of High Def video was funny, just wait until you read this little tidbit:

QUOTE
If you dropped a bundle on a high-end computer display or HDTV, you could be in for an unpleasant surprise when you slip your new high-definition DVD of Star Wars: Episode III into your Windows Vista PC. Vista, the next version of Windows that's slated to appear in about a year, will feature a new systemwide content protection scheme called PVP-OPM (see box below). If your monitor doesn't work with PVP-OPM, all you'll likely see is either a fuzzy rendition of your high-def flick or Hollywood's version of the Blue Screen of Death--a message warning you that the display has been 'revoked'.


Source: http://pcworld.com/n...d,122738,00.asp

So, essentially, not only will you be forced into purchasing both drive formats to view video from all the studios, but you'll also have to buy a new monitor to watch the f*cking things. For those of us with HTPC's, upgrades in future will have to take all of this into account.

Not to mention 99% of people seem totally fine with DVD's as they are. I have no desire to repurchase my entire collection. Remember DVD Audio? Neither does anybody else.

Anybody else want to toll this bell for next-generation video? I can do it if you like...

the_travis_s
  • the_travis_s

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#2

Posted 05 October 2005 - 06:54 AM

No, this isn't directly related to the media type (though I can see how you'd think that).

It's talking about high definition video in general, regardless of the source. Downloaded video, off a DVD, whatever.

Yeah, pretty awesome huh? Vista's looking to be a real winner, way to go Microsoft!

SIP YEK NOD
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#3

Posted 05 October 2005 - 07:06 AM Edited by SIP YEK NOD, 05 October 2005 - 07:13 AM.

f*ck that noise. so we have to spring for not only new monitors, but also buy windows vista just to watch the next format of movies?



so almost every HDTV made so far is going to be rendered obsolete to stop people from recording off HD-DVDs/Blue ray disks/possibly even HDTV Broadcasts, even though the people who want to record off these devices have already found work-arounds? how convenient confused.gif



QUOTE (gateway computers)
What happens if I lose signal to the TV while watching a movie on a HDCP equipped component?

The component, such as a DVD player, must be restarted to establish renegotiation.

Example: While watching a movie on a HDCP enabled DVD player, you change the "receiver" (DTV, monitor, projector) input to watch broadcast TV, and then change the input back to watch the DVD movie. However, you are unable to watch the movie. This is because when the input was changed, the receiver lost the HDCP signal. Restart the HDCP enabled DVD player to allow renegotiation.



how f*cking convenient

Cran.
  • Cran.

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#4

Posted 05 October 2005 - 07:31 AM Edited by Cran., 05 October 2005 - 08:27 AM.

That's an assrape for us all. Some people will complain it's like San An PC being only on DVD, but this is entirely different. We have to buy a new monitor, two new drives, and a f*cking new OS for it. Like i'm going to get Windows Vista on any of my current systems confused.gif What the f*ck is wrong with DVD's anyway?

Dear lord, what the f*ck has happend?

And wtf happends to laptop owners...

QUOTE
PVP-OPM employs HDCP technology to determine whether graphics boards and displays are allowed to output and display high-def video. If HDCP sees a blocked display (such as a video capture device) or one that does not support HDCP (including any HDTV with only analog connectors), it prevents output or reduces the video resolution until the offending display or protected content is removed from the system.


So what, it'll reduce the quailty to normal DVD?!??!?! wow.gif sad.gif

SIP YEK NOD
  • SIP YEK NOD

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#5

Posted 05 October 2005 - 05:21 PM

QUOTE (Cran. @ Oct 5 2005, 01:31)
QUOTE
PVP-OPM employs HDCP technology to determine whether graphics boards and displays are allowed to output and display high-def video. If HDCP sees a blocked display (such as a video capture device) or one that does not support HDCP (including any HDTV with only analog connectors), it prevents output or reduces the video resolution until the offending display or protected content is removed from the system.


So what, it'll reduce the quailty to normal DVD?!??!?! wow.gif sad.gif

to vhs*

Rocketkiller
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#6

Posted 05 October 2005 - 09:08 PM

That's what happens when a small software company vecomes a monopoly. mad.gif

_-playero-_
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#7

Posted 09 October 2005 - 03:52 AM

Of course, later we will need to buy Microsoft Screens only...

SIP YEK NOD
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#8

Posted 09 October 2005 - 04:43 AM

you guys seem to be missing the big picture here.its not only computer monitors being affected. if you have a blue ray player for that newest movie, and a high def TV without HDCP protection. you don't get high def video. and they are trying to do the same with High-def tv broadcasts.

this isnt a good swift ass-raping by microsoft. this is a massively massive long painful peehole raping by the entertainment industry.




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