Quantcast

Jump to content

» «
Photo

Anyone here bought the Marketing Ploy?

5 replies to this topic
jersiq
  • jersiq

    Division By Zero

  • Members
  • Joined: 11 Feb 2005

#1

Posted 20 April 2005 - 01:09 AM

Gigabit Ethernet's uselessness to the home user

Just kind of curious if anyone here has any HOME experience with a Giga network, and if they saw the speed potential fall flat on it's face?

Premise is that although the network is theoretically fast, it will only go as fast as it's weakest link (servers, etc.)
In other words, the speed is actually bogged down by the HDD, and RAM of the server or peer you are connecting to.

I use Giga at work, on our Catalyst 6500 switches (2) we have a 16 port Giga card (yes 16 individual Gigabit Ethernet ports), and even as a cell phone ISP we don't come close to the bandwidth utilization on these ports even during peaks. We are using only 5 of the ports for all of our HA traffic. But I want to hear what people have to say if they implemented it on their home networks.

Purple Phatness
  • Purple Phatness

    Big Perm Reparsent

  • BUSTED!
  • Joined: 20 Apr 2005

#2

Posted 21 April 2005 - 04:13 AM

I'd hardly call it a "marketing ploy". The cards don't cost any more than regular NICs and most motherboards come integrated with Gigabit ethernet (hell, some even come with two). When I used my box as a non-NAT router to allow other PCs access to the internet, using two Gigabit ports to link the computers (20 ft. Cat6) seemed to cut down a lot of the negative factors about running ICS on a Windows box.

Harddrive capacity... now there's a marketing ploy.

Edwards
  • Edwards

    sysnode netadmin

  • Andolini Mafia Family
  • Joined: 31 Dec 2001

#3

Posted 21 April 2005 - 11:55 PM Edited by Edwards, 22 April 2005 - 07:58 PM.

Ye gods, that is a horribly written and rather misinformed page.

-Gigabit ethernet does not have anything to do with a clock speed (1000MHz as they say), it's a peak transfer at full duplex of 1000Mb/s
-A 1000% percent improvement isn't 10x, it's 11x (1000% plus the original 100% being improved upon). Same with 400% and others.
-Why does it matter that almost all broadband connections use an MTU of 1500, and gigabit ethernet allegedly needs 9000+? This is ethernet, not broadband.

edit: typo

jersiq
  • jersiq

    Division By Zero

  • Members
  • Joined: 11 Feb 2005

#4

Posted 22 April 2005 - 04:16 PM

QUOTE
Gigabit ethernet does not have anything to do with a clock speed (1000MHz as they say), it's a peak transfer at full duplex of 2000Mb/s


Are you sure about that: This is from a company that knows quite a bit about networking: CISCO

QUOTE
Gigabit Ethernet builds on top of the Ethernet protocol, but increases speed tenfold over Fast Ethernet to 1000 Mbps, or 1 gigabit per second (Gbps). This protocol, which was standardized in June 1998

Cisco Tech brief on Gigabit ethernet
They had to use some signaling strategies as well as full duplex in order to achieve 1000 Mbps.
I guess my point was more for implementation of Giga than anything (switches cabling etc). Although Cat-5 is specified for GIGA, some loss ratios, and FEXT (far end cross talk) and NEXT (near end cross talk) specs by some cable manufacturers can limit long runs of cable, requiring the purchase of a higher grade CAT5
QUOTE
Why does it matter that almost all broadband connections use an MTU of 1500, and gigabit ethernet allegedly needs 9000+? This is ethernet, not broadband.

On your backhaul system to your ISP is the MTU of 1500. So only within your home LAN environment will you use jumbo frames. Some people believe that a GIGA switch will alloe them to achieve higher ISP speeds.

Wheelman
  • Wheelman

    n00b patrol

  • Members
  • Joined: 07 Jun 2002

#5

Posted 22 April 2005 - 05:44 PM

QUOTE (jersiq @ Apr 22 2005, 17:16)
QUOTE
Gigabit ethernet does not have anything to do with a clock speed (1000MHz as they say), it's a peak transfer at full duplex of 2000Mb/s


Are you sure about that: This is from a company that knows quite a bit about networking: CISCO

Where does it say it's from Cisco? dontgetit.gif

QUOTE (jersiq @ Apr 22 2005, 17:16)
QUOTE
Gigabit Ethernet builds on top of the Ethernet protocol, but increases speed tenfold over Fast Ethernet to 1000 Mbps, or 1 gigabit per second (Gbps). This protocol, which was standardized in June 1998

Cisco Tech brief on Gigabit ethernet
They had to use some signaling strategies as well as full duplex in order to achieve 1000 Mbps.

I've never witnessed a 100megabit network actually achieve 100mbps, either. It's only logical assume that with a gigabit network, the same applies.

QUOTE (jersiq @ Apr 22 2005, 17:16)
QUOTE
Why does it matter that almost all broadband connections use an MTU of 1500, and gigabit ethernet allegedly needs 9000+? This is ethernet, not broadband.

On your backhaul system to your ISP is the MTU of 1500. So only within your home LAN environment will you use jumbo frames. Some people believe that a GIGA switch will alloe them to achieve higher ISP speeds.

I've never once seen gigabit ethernet advertised as boosting your net connection speed. I suspect that most people would be inclined to think this, probably wouldn't even know what gigabit ethernet was.

Edwards
  • Edwards

    sysnode netadmin

  • Andolini Mafia Family
  • Joined: 31 Dec 2001

#6

Posted 22 April 2005 - 07:58 PM

QUOTE (jersiq @ Apr 22 2005, 11:16)
QUOTE
Gigabit ethernet does not have anything to do with a clock speed (1000MHz as they say), it's a peak transfer at full duplex of 2000Mb/s


Are you sure about that: This is from a company that knows quite a bit about networking: CISCO

QUOTE
Gigabit Ethernet builds on top of the Ethernet protocol, but increases speed tenfold over Fast Ethernet to 1000 Mbps, or 1 gigabit per second (Gbps). This protocol, which was standardized in June 1998

Cisco Tech brief on Gigabit ethernet
They had to use some signaling strategies as well as full duplex in order to achieve 1000 Mbps.
I guess my point was more for implementation of Giga than anything (switches cabling etc). Although Cat-5 is specified for GIGA, some loss ratios, and FEXT (far end cross talk) and NEXT (near end cross talk) specs by some cable manufacturers can limit long runs of cable, requiring the purchase of a higher grade CAT5
QUOTE
Why does it matter that almost all broadband connections use an MTU of 1500, and gigabit ethernet allegedly needs 9000+? This is ethernet, not broadband.

On your backhaul system to your ISP is the MTU of 1500. So only within your home LAN environment will you use jumbo frames. Some people believe that a GIGA switch will alloe them to achieve higher ISP speeds.

1) Whoops, I meant to say 1000Mb/s. 500Mb/s each way (which is what full duplex is, in both directions).

2) Cat 5 cables can't carry gigabit properly. That's what 5e is for. Don't expect Cat 3 to be able to carry 100Mb/s either.

3) Some people believe in Santa Claus, too.




1 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 1 guests, 0 anonymous users